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Unix+clones Using Public Key Authentication with SSH
Post date: June 26, 2008, 05:06 Category: Network Views: 1292 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: The current leading SSH server, OpenSSH, offers two main methods of authentication: interactive password and public key authentication. While interactive password authentication is the default, there are several reasons for using public key authentication. After reading some background information about public key cryptography, you should have a firm understanding of what public key cryptography is and how it works. You're welcome to skip straight to generating keys for use with SSH. Setting up public key authentication will require a few minutes, but the results are worthwhile.
Mepis Upgrading to Linux from Windows 98
Post date: April 18, 2005, 02:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2084 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: In this tutorial-style article, Michael C. Barnes outlines a strategy to avoid costly upgrades from Windows 98 to Windows XP -- in terms of both hardware and software -- by upgrading to Linux, instead. Barnes reviews the typical requirements of computers used for relatively generic purposes, and shows how to give a new lease on life to aging laptops and PCs by replacing obsolete OSes such as Windows 98 with a combination of Linux, free open source applications, and inexpensive commercial software.
Windows How to install KDE4 applications on Windows
Post date: August 28, 2008, 12:08 Category: Software Views: 1299 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial describes how to install and run KDE4 applications natively on Windows. Windows 2000, XP, and Vista are supported. KOffice, Kopete, Amarok, Ktorrent, Konquerror, KDevelop, K3b, Kmail, Dolphin are only some of them.
Windows Three Ways To Access Linux Partitions (ext2/ext3) From Windows On Dual-Boot Systems
Post date: January 20, 2008, 06:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2233 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: If you have a dual-boot Windows/Linux system, you probably know this problem: you can access files from your Windows installation while you are in Linux, but not the other way round. This tutorial shows three ways how you can access your Linux partitions (with ext2 or ext3 filesystem) from within Windows: Explore2fs, DiskInternals Linux Reader, and the Ext2 Installable File System For Windows. While the first two provide read-only access, the Ext2 Installable File System For Windows can be used for read and write operations.
Debian How to Install Latest Wine in debian Etch
Post date: December 22, 2008, 01:12 Category: Software Views: 784 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Wine makes it possible to run Windows programs alongside any Unix-like operating system,particularly Linux. At its heart, Wine is an implementation of the Windows Application
Programing Interface (API) library, acting as a bridge between the Windows program and Linux.Think of Wine as a compatibility layer, when a Windows program tries to perform a function that Linux doesn’t normally understand, Wine will translate that program’s instruction into one supported by the system. For example, if a program asks the system to create a Windows pushbutton or text-edit field, Wine will convert that instruction into its Linux equivalent in the form of a command to the window manager using the standard X11 protocol.
Ubuntu Installing Ubuntu From A Windows System With Wubi
Post date: September 11, 2007, 17:09 Category: Installing Views: 1360 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Wubi is an Ubuntu installer for Windows that lets you install and uninstall Ubuntu from a Windows desktop. Wubi adds an entry to the Windows boot menu which allows you to run Linux. Ubuntu is installed within a file in the Windows file system (a loopmounted partition), this file is seen by Ubuntu as a real hard disk. That way the hard drive does not have to be repartitioned before the Ubuntu installation. The resulting Ubuntu installation is a "real" Linux system, not just a virtual machine. Wubi makes it easy for Linux newbies to play around with Ubuntu.
Linux How to install Linux on Windows using VirtualBox
Post date: August 12, 2008, 09:08 Category: Installing Views: 1051 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to install Linux and specifically Ubuntu Linux on Windows XP using SUN's VirtualBox. VirtualBox creates a virtual hard drive in which you can install another guest Operating System (Ubuntu Linux) which you can run along with your host Operating System (Windows XP). This way you can try Linux without being afraid of losing your Windows files.
Ubuntu Dual-Booting Windows XP/Vista And Ubuntu 7.04
Post date: July 20, 2007, 19:07 Category: Desktop Views: 2412 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: In this tutorial I will teach you how to dual-boot between Windows XP/Vista and Ubuntu. This tutorial will be split up into two parts: Part one for people who have no operating system installed. Part two for people who have Windows XP/Vista installed and do not want to re-install Windows.
Unix+clones X Window Manager Benchmarks (E17 on Top)
Post date: June 9, 2005, 09:06 Category: Benchmarks Views: 1456 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: I've been focusing on some stability issues of late in E17, but more importantly - speed. I've been doing a little profiling and shaving off cycles where I can find readily optimizable code. I have E17 starting in 0.52 seconds (from execute to usable desktop). Considering that involves loading and rendering and scaling a complex multi-leayered desktop background, loading multiple useful modules (pager, ibar, start, dropshadow, cpufreq handler, clock, etc.), then that's not too bad.

Now I'm a numbers man. I like numbers. I don't like vague "it's faster than X" or "that's slower than this" statements without numbers to back it up. I also like to play fair. Also given there are no "performance suites" i know of that measure window manager performance, I wrote a quick and dirty one.
Fedora+Core The Perfect Desktop - Part 1: Fedora Core 6
Post date: February 22, 2007, 13:02 Category: Desktop Views: 2379 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: With the release of Microsoft's new Windows operating system (Vista), more and more people are looking for alternatives to Windows for various reasons. This tutorial is the first of a series of articles where I will show people who are willing to switch to Linux how they can set up a Linux desktop (Fedora Core 6 in this article) that fully replaces their Windows desktop, i.e. that has all software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge.