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Search results for A Fresh Approach - SUSE 10.1 package management

Linux Traffic shaping and bandwidth management
Post date: April 17, 2005, 06:04 Category: Network Views: 64
Tutorial quote: This article is from the perspective of a small network, possibly a couple of people sharing one connection. It will explain traffic shaping and bandwidth management in general and with linx. It (sort of) walks through building a traffic shaping router.
Unix+clones A Tutorial Introduction to The arch Revision Control System
Post date: November 27, 2005, 17:11 Category: Software Views: 47
Tutorial quote: arch is a revision control, source code management, and configuration management tool.

This manual is an arch tutorial: its purpose is to help you get started using arch for the first time, and then learn some of the more advanced features of arch.
Debian How To Set Up A Load-Balanced MySQL Cluster
Post date: March 31, 2006, 14:03 Category: Software Views: 13
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to configure a MySQL 5 cluster with three nodes: two storage nodes and one management node. This cluster is load-balanced by a high-availability load balancer that in fact has two nodes that use the Ultra Monkey package which provides heartbeat (for checking if the other node is still alive) and ldirectord (to split up the requests to the nodes of the MySQL cluster).

In this document I use Debian Sarge for all nodes. Therefore the setup might differ a bit for other distributions. The MySQL version I use in this setup is 5.0.19. If you do not want to use MySQL 5, you can use MySQL 4.1 as well, although I haven't tested it.

This howto is meant as a practical guide; it does not cover the theoretical backgrounds. They are treated in a lot of other documents in the web.
Unix+clones Comparing MySQL performance
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 57
Tutorial quote: With the introduction of the 2.6 Linux kernel, FreeBSD-5-STABLE, Solaris 10, and now NetBSD 2.0, you might be wondering which of them offers superior database performance. In my previous article, I discussed the tools I chose to test these venerable operating systems and the methodology by which they were tested. The result is this MySQL performance comparison between OpenBSD 3.6; NetBSD 2.0; FreeBSD 5.3 and 4.10; Solaris Express (build 69); and Linux 2.4 and 2.6 (Gentoo-based). Read on for the results.
Debian Easy SugarCRM Configuration Steps
Post date: April 20, 2006, 15:04 Category: Installing Views: 12
Tutorial quote: SugarCRM includes a sales, marketing, and service suite of CRM applications. Sugar.Sales includes account and contact management, opportunity management, activity tracking, charting, reporting, and email integration with MS Outlook. SugarCRM is easy to install and supports custom user interface templates that are optimized for speed.
Debian Setting up a local web server in Debian Linux
Post date: January 21, 2006, 01:01 Category: Network Views: 41
Tutorial quote: Any web developer, designer, or webmaster can benefit from having a local web server. Even if that developer has no interest in securing and maintaining the server his or her websites live on, a local server can act as a convenient mirror for testing updates, trying new designs, and other general sand-boxing activities.

Web developers whose hosts utilize the popular LAMP platform (Linux + Apache + MySQL + PHP) are frequently hit with a dilemma. Since understanding Linux is not a prerequisite for website administrators, many of them lack the knowledge necessary for setting up a LAMP server from scratch (or at least they may think so). But thanks to the improved package management on Linux distributions like Debian, installing a functional web server is not nearly the chore it was just a couple years ago.
OpenBSD Rebuilding the OpenBSD kernel
Post date: April 24, 2005, 16:04 Category: System Views: 93
Tutorial quote: Users who want their OpenBSD machine to perform specific functions or need additional device drivers might want to customize their kernel. In other OS's, like some types of Linux, it is very popular to rebuild the kernel because the default is so bloated. For most users, the default OpenBSD kernel is sufficient; however, you should still apply kernel patches, which will require rebuilding and installing a fresh kernel.
Ubuntu SAMBA (Domaincontroller) Server For Small Workgroups With Ubuntu 5.10 "Breezy Badger"
Post date: December 14, 2005, 14:12 Category: Network Views: 147
Tutorial quote: This is a detailed description about the steps to set up a Ubuntu based server (Ubuntu 5.10 - Breezy Badger) to act as file- and print server for Windows (tm) workstations in small workgroups. This howto uses the tdb backend for SAMBA to store passwords and account information. This is suitable for workgroups for up to 250 users and is easier to setup than an LDAP backend. A second howto covering the installation of LDAP + SAMBA will be published soon.
OpenBSD Using OpenBSD
Post date: April 26, 2006, 10:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 23
Tutorial quote: Many people responded to the call for OpenBSD and OpenSSH donations by purchasing an OpenBSD CD set. Those CDs are beginning to arrive in the mail, and when they do, how are you going to use them? If you're a software enthusiast who has never used OpenBSD before, you might enjoy installing it by yourself and figuring it out as you go. If, however, you're looking for a more practical approach to using OpenBSD as a desktop or server operating system, here's a guide to get you started.
Linux Monitoring and Managing Linux Software RAID
Post date: April 15, 2005, 19:04 Category: System Views: 56
Tutorial quote: Systems administrators managing a data center face numerous challenges to achieve required availability and uptime. Two of the main challenges are shrinking budgets (for hardware, software, and staffing) and short deadlines in which to deliver solutions. The Linux community has developed kernel support for software RAID (Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks) to help meet those challenges. Software RAID, properly implemented, can eliminate system downtime caused by disk drive errors. The source code to the Linux kernel, the RAID modules, and the raidtools package are available at minimal cost under the GNU Public License. The interface is well documented and comprehensible to a moderately experienced Linux systems administrator.

In this article, I'll provide an overview of the software RAID implementation in the Linux 2.4.X kernel. I will describe the creation and activation of software RAID devices as well as the management of active RAID devices. Finally, I will discuss some procedures for recovering from a failed disk unit.