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Debian Firebird database Configuration
Post date: May 5, 2006, 13:05 Category: Installing Views: 4
Tutorial quote: Firebird is a relational database offering many ANSI SQL-99 features that runs on Linux, Windows, and a variety of Unix platforms. Firebird offers excellent concurrency, high performance, and powerful language support for stored procedures and triggers. It has been used in production systems, under a variety of names since 1981.

Firebird is a commercially independent project of C and C++ programmers, technical advisors and supporters developing and enhancing a multi-platform relational database management system based on the source code released by Inprise Corp (now known as Borland Software Corp) under the InterBase Public License v.1.0 on 25 July, 2000.
Debian Creating a Wiki with kwiki
Post date: December 17, 2005, 17:12 Category: Software Views: 52
Tutorial quote: Wikis are simple interactive websites which are extremely easy to use for storing easily updated text content. Using a Wiki you can easily create a lot of content with hyperlinks between them. Debian has packaged several different Wiki systems and here we'll look at installing just one of them: KWiki.

Wikis have become familiar to many people thanks to the popularity of large sites such as Wikipedia and can be very useful for creating collaborative websites.

Whilst there are many Wiki packages included in the Debian GNU/Linux distribution I've always had a soft spot for KWiki due to its simplicity, Perl nature, and low requirements.

Installing the software under Debian is very simple and we will show how to setup a new installation using the Debian Apache2 webserver package.
Linux LCD displays easy to use and easy to build
Post date: May 24, 2005, 14:05 Category: Hardware Views: 113
Tutorial quote: This article presents now the "basic" model: LCD display and 2 buttons; simple and easy to build for everybody.

Lcdproc used to be at the very beginning a program to display some statistics (cpu load, uptime, time, ...) on an external LCD display. Over time it has however evolved into a much more generic solution. Today the lcdproc package contains LCDd, a generic server and LCD driver, plus many clients. One of those clients is still the actual executable called lcdproc which still shows server statistics however there are also others. This client server architecture has the big advantage that you do not need to write your client in a specific language. You just need to use the simple ascii protocol between client and server.
Unix+clones Using MySQL to benchmark OS performance
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 93
Tutorial quote: It seems to be an exciting time for *nix operating systems, with a number of them recently releasing new versions that bring the addition of expanded features and claims of improved performance. If you're using GNU/Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD, or Solaris as a database server, you've probably recently considered an upgrade or switch to another OS in that list due to marketing hype and hearsay. This article will show you how to benchmark operating system performance using MySQL on these OSes so you can find out for yourself if you're missing out. While this may not necessarily be indicative of overall system performance or overall database application performance, it will tell you specifically how well MySQL performs on your platform.

The following operating systems were used for the comparison testing:
- FreeBSD 4.11
- FreeBSD 5.3
- NetBSD 2.0
- Linux 2.6
- Linux 2.4
- Solaris 10 x86 (build 69)
- OpenBSD 3.6
Linux Building an LDAP Server on Linux, Part 2
Post date: April 15, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 51
Tutorial quote: Welcome back! In Part 1 we learned basic concepts of LDAP and the uses for an LDAP server. Today we'll install and configure an OpenLDAP directory.

A quick note before we get started: this is LDAP 101. We are not installing any kind of encryption or strong authentication; we'll get to that in part 3. In my experience, learning LDAP in small chunks works best. (Then again, perhaps I'm just a bit dim.) So sit back, strap in, and keep your fingers away from the training wheels.

"The wise sysadmin will consult the documentation for their distro; it's quite possible that OpenLDAP will be packaged and ready to go in a pleasing manner (or ready to go in an odd manner--you never know). I'm all for easy--if your particular distribution provides an easy way, use it. RPMs can also be obtained from rpmfind.net, which thoughtfully lists all the required additional packages.

"Debian of course goes its own merry way. apt-get does the job just fine; the tricky bit is finding out the package names. Debian users want ldap-utils; slapd, which is OpenLDAP; and libdb4.1, to get the Sleepycat DB. These three components are enough to get you up and running. apt-get will walk you through a minimal configuration and will automatically start up slapd, the LDAP server daemon.
Linux Linux Web Filtering in 7 steps
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Network Views: 423
Tutorial quote: How to install a transparent Squid proxy server with real-time HTTP virus scanning on Mandrake 10.0 using DansGuardian and ClamAV?

People quickly and easily access volumes of research on the Internet and correspond with a mouse click. For more and more companies, content filtering is part of the large battle to combat all kinds of online threats, including hackers, worms and viruses. Linux content filtering allows administrators to configure and manage Internet access across the entire network and to block unwanted Web content like pornography, shopping Web sites, games and gambling.

This guide contains all the necessary information for installing and understanding the architectural layout of the implementation. It was written with the assumption that you understand how to install programs and have a basic understanding of Linux Mandrake. This includes installing Linux Mandrake and RPM packages, editing files, making directories, compiling software and understanding general UNIX commands. This guide doesn’t explain how to use or configure Squid, DansGuardian and ClamAV but information on where to obtain this information can be found in the “Additional information” section.