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Unix+clones A Tutorial Introduction to The arch Revision Control System
Post date: November 27, 2005, 17:11 Category: Software Views: 47
Tutorial quote: arch is a revision control, source code management, and configuration management tool.

This manual is an arch tutorial: its purpose is to help you get started using arch for the first time, and then learn some of the more advanced features of arch.
Unix+clones Keeping Your Life in Subversion
Post date: October 2, 2005, 12:10 Category: Software Views: 119
Tutorial quote: I keep my life in a Subversion repository. For the past five years, I've checked every file I've created and worked on, every email I've sent or received, and every config file I've tweaked into revision control. Five years ago, when I started doing this using CVS, people thought I was nuts to use revision control in this way. Today it's still not a common practice, but thanks to my earlier article "CVS homedir" (Linux Journal, issue 101), I know I'm not alone. In this article I will describe how my new home directory setup is working now that I've switched from CVS to Subversion.

Subversion is a revision-control system. Like the earlier and much cruftier CVS, its purpose is to manage chunks of code, such as free software programs with multiple developers, or in-house software projects involving several employees. Unlike CVS, Subversion handles directories and file renaming reasonably, which is more than sufficient reason to switch to it if you're already using CVS. It also fixes most of CVS's other misfeatures. Subversion still has its warts, though, such as an inability to store symbolic links and some file permissions, and its need for twice as much disk space as you'd expect thanks to the copies of everything in those .svn directories. These problems can be quite annoying when you're keeping your whole home directory in svn. Why bother?
Linux Introduction to Linux files
Post date: April 12, 2005, 12:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 33
Tutorial quote: This newbie-level Linux tutorial is an introduction to handling files from the Linux command line. It will cover finding files, determining their type, renaming, copying, examining their attributes, reading their contents, and, in the case of binary files, how to get clues to learn something more about them. Further reading will be suggested for editing files since that topic is beyond the scope of this article.
Linux The Linux /proc Filesystem as a Programmers' Tool
Post date: June 22, 2005, 05:06 Category: Programming Views: 137
Tutorial quote: My entry into systems programming was guided by my desire to understand further the operating systems I was working with daily as a contract UNIX and, later, Linux system administrator. The result of this was ifchk, a packet sniffer detector I wrote in C and released in June of 2003. ifchk initially was written under IRIX and then ported to Linux, mostly under the 2.4 kernel. The current ifchk revision, beta 4, recently was released and beta 5 is on the way.

My work on ifchk has allowed me to examine programmatically several areas of operating system functionality. Examples include the Linux netlink(7) and rtnetlink(7) facilities, device control--that is, network interfaces--via ioctl(2), signals and proc, the process filesystem. Proc and its ability to display a wide array of data concerning the runtime state of a system are the focus of our discussion here.
Arch XOrg Font Configuration
Post date: April 13, 2005, 21:04 Category: Desktop Views: 122
Tutorial quote: Learn how to add/remove and configure your fonts on Arch.
Unix+clones Version Control with Subversion (Online book)
Post date: April 27, 2005, 23:04 Category: Software Views: 53
Tutorial quote: This is the online home of Version Control with Subversion, a free book about Subversion, a new version control system designed to supplant CVS. As you may have guessed from the layout of this page, this book is published by O'Reilly Media.
Debian Installing SVN with apache on debian
Post date: March 20, 2006, 15:03 Category: Software Views: 36
Tutorial quote: Today I started to set up a SVN repository for our final year project. I tried to setup a SVN server using Apache2 so that the SVN repository is available to the client through the WebDAV/DeltaV protocol. Read on for a trial-and-error introduction.

The Version Control with Subversion book (by Ben Collins-Sussman, Brian W. Fitzpatrick & C. Michael Pilato) was very useful to me when I struggled with SVN. The e-version of the book also available for free.
OSX VNC control of a Mac under OS X 10.4
Post date: December 10, 2005, 03:12 Category: Network Views: 60
Tutorial quote: VNC support is built right into Tiger. This means you can remote control you mac from an another mac a PC or even you Palm or Blackberry.

However the functionality is a bit hidden. Here are the simple steps to set it up. Remember this is TIGER not Panther.
Debian ACL(Access Control List) Configuration
Post date: April 4, 2006, 16:04 Category: Installing Views: 21
Tutorial quote: Access Control Lists (ACLs) provide a much more flexible way of specifying permissions on a file or other object than the standard Unix user/group/owner system. Windows NT and above, when running on an NTFS partition, use ACLs to specify permissions on files and directories. This document attempts to show how you can enable ACL support on your Linux box and use Samba to provide an SMB file server for use by machines in a Windows 2000 domain.

ACLs are best stored in the actual file system itself. To that end, there are patches available for ext2 and ext3 that enable ACL support using Extended Attributes (EAs). SGI's XFS also has ACL support built in, but XFS is not currently covered in this document.
FreeBSD Using FreeBSD's ACLs
Post date: September 29, 2005, 13:09 Category: Security Views: 152
Tutorial quote: Five years ago (gee, has it really been that long?), I wrote a series of articles on understanding Unix permissions. Since then, FreeBSD has implemented something known as ACLs (Access Control Lists).

ACLs came to BSD as part of the TrustedBSD project. As the name suggests, they give a user finer access control over permissions.