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Fedora+Core VNC (Virtual Network Computing) 101
Post date: April 15, 2005, 20:04 Category: Network Views: 121
Tutorial quote: VNC stands for Virtual Network Computing. It is remote control software which allows you to view and interact with one computer (the "server") using a simple program (the "viewer") on another computer anywhere on the Internet. The two computers don't even have to be the same type, so for example you can use VNC to view an office Linux machine on your Windows PC at home. VNC is freely and publicly available and is in widespread active use by millions throughout industry, academia and privately.
Unix+clones Squeeze Your Gigabit NIC for Top Performance
Post date: June 24, 2005, 21:06 Category: Optimizing Views: 135
Tutorial quote: Many new workstations and servers are coming with integrated gigabit network cards, but quite a few people soon discover that they can't transfer data much faster than they did with 100 Mb/s network cards. Multiple factors can affect your ability to transfer at higher speeds, and most of them revolve around operating system settings. In this article we will discuss the necessary steps to make your new gigabit-enabled server obtain close to gigabit speeds in Linux, FreeBSD, and Windows.
Gentoo Bandwidth limiting howto
Post date: June 12, 2005, 22:06 Category: Network Views: 120
Tutorial quote: Linux has a very powerful mechanism for controlling network bandwidth usage. As being powerful inevitably implies being complex, this feature is documented in lengthy and exhaustive documents in great details. These documents however can prove to be excessive in their length and language to users who are looking for simple solutions for simple questions. This guide aims to give a short and practical introduction on how to solve some common issues that users tend to experience on an everyday basis.
OpenSUSE Hacking OpenSUSE
Post date: December 3, 2005, 12:12 Category: System Views: 133
Tutorial quote: There's more to SUSE Linux than simply installing it and going to work. To get the most from the operating system, you'll probably want to do some post-install fine tuning. This article by Jem Matzan explains how to: add download sources to YaST; install the Mozilla Thunderbird email client; add support for Java, Flash, Acrobat, Windows Media, MP3s, and RealMedia; play DVDs -- and more. It serves as a useful supplement to Steven J. Rosen's excellent how-to, "Installing SUSE Linux 10 on a Laptop," recently published here on DesktopLinux.com. Enjoy . . . !
Unix+clones Command your network with Kaboodle
Post date: June 28, 2005, 05:06 Category: Network Views: 91
Tutorial quote: Quite often setting up a local network is much easier than managing it. Even technically challenged users can figure out how to connect a couple of computers and a printer. However, tasks like maintenance, troubleshooting, and remote secure connections require more than just "which-cable-goes-where" knowledge. You need something like Kaboodle, a nifty tool that can help you to manage your local network like a pro.

Kaboodle allows you to visualize your local network, control computers on it via VNC, and connect to other Kaboodle-enabled networks. Kaboodle was developed for Windows, but according to its Web site, it will happily run under Wine on Linux and FreeBSD.
Debian Complete Debian Linux Server Setup Guide
Post date: March 14, 2006, 19:03 Category: Installing Views: 39
Tutorial quote: This tutorial includes debian Installation,FTP Server Setup,Webserver Setup,Samba Server Setup,Database Server Setup,time clock sync server,
Mail Server Configuration,VNC Server setup,Proxy Server Setup,SSH Server Setup,tftp Server Setup,DHCP Server Setup,
IPtables Configuration,DNS Server Setup,Firewalls configuration,Backup configuration
Debian Installing and Configuring Exim4
Post date: February 25, 2006, 07:02 Category: Network Views: 88
Tutorial quote: Installion of Exim4 from the latest Debian GNU/Linux packages is easy. The installation is now based around debconf. If you are upgrading from a simple Exim3 configuration, you can use exim_convert4r4 to convert your configuration file to the new format. If you used the previous version of this guide, which covered Exim3, the conversion should succeed without incident. I intend to discuss configuration via debconf, including setting up local delivery to Maildir format, handling local domain email, and configuring smarthosting for outbound email.
Unix+clones CLI Magic: OpenSSH + Bash
Post date: January 25, 2006, 15:01 Category: Network Views: 30
Tutorial quote: As a system administrator, I have used OpenSSH's piping abilities more times than I can remember. The typical ssh call gets me access to systems for administration with a proven identity, but ssh is capable of so much more. In combination with bash's subshell invocation, OpenSSH can distribute the heavy work, reduce trace interference on a system under test, and make other "impossible" tasks possible. I've even used it to make Microsoft Windows remote administration easier.

In the examples below, I have tried to avoid GNU-specific idioms for tools which have non-GNU counterparts. This practice improves portability of shell scripts in heterogeneous environments.
Linux WiFi PDA Meets Linux--Part 3
Post date: May 28, 2005, 18:05 Category: Software Views: 74
Tutorial quote: Did you know that your new WiFi-equipped iPAQ can be used as a VoIP communicator? How about your Linux notebook? The program that makes it possible is called Skype and it lets you call other Skype users over the Internet for free. You can also call regular phone numbers for very competitive per-minute rates. As it turns out, Skype is available for both platforms and Windows, too. Although it's not an Open Source solution, it is freely available and fits nicely into our WiFi-PDA-meets-Linux bag of tools.

Join me now to discover how you can use the program on the iPAQ and a Linux notebook.
Unix+clones Apple's G5 versus x86, Mac OS X versus Linux
Post date: June 3, 2005, 23:06 Category: Benchmarks Views: 117
Tutorial quote: This article is written solely from the frustration that I could not get a clear picture on what the G5 and Mac OS X are capable of. So, be warned; this is not an all-round review. It is definitely the worst buyer’s guide that you can imagine. This article cares about speed, performance, and nothing else! No comments on how well designed the internals are, no elaborate discussions about user friendliness, out-of-the-box experience and other subjective subjects. But we think that you should have a decent insight to where the G5/Mac OS X combination positions itself when compared to the Intel & AMD world at the end of this article.