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Search results for ALSA sound mixer aka dmix

Gentoo ALSA sound mixer aka dmix
Post date: April 12, 2005, 01:04 Category: Hardware Views: 43
Tutorial quote: PCM plugins extend the functionality of PCM devices allowing low-level sample conversions and copying between channels, files and soundcard devices. The dmix plugin provides for direct mixing of multiple streams. This is great for people whose sound card only supports 1 channel (no hardware mixing).
Gentoo Painless sound mixing using ALSA
Post date: May 13, 2005, 01:05 Category: Multimedia Views: 93
Tutorial quote: This Doc is only meant to supplement the preexisting ALSA guide offered by the Gentoo folks.

Just thought I might want to add to the existing information about sound mixing using alsa. Here's what you need to do in order to use sound mixing in ALSA.
Gentoo Ripping cds using FLAC
Post date: June 22, 2005, 09:06 Category: Multimedia Views: 151
Tutorial quote: I'm a fan of sound quality, and since I have some disc space free, I decided to rip some CDs to the free lossless audio codec (FLAC) instead of ogg vorbis which I was using before. The compression rate is for now about 50%, depending on the content of the audio file. Also I found that FLAC encodes VERY fast (~60-140x on my Athlon XP 2400+).
Linux Building an LDAP Server on Linux, Part 1
Post date: April 15, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 48
Tutorial quote: Your network is growing in size and complexity. It's taking on a life of its own, spreading and growing and absorbing everything in its path. You're tearing your hair out trying to keep track, and your users have somehow discovered your secret phone number and are pestering you with endless questions and demands--where do I find this; I don't want to keep track of a dozen different passwords; nothing works like it should.

Of several possible solutions, consider two: 1) find a new hiding place, or 2) implement an LDAP server. While finding a new hiding place might sound ideal, it's an option we're going to have to save for a future article. This series will instead explain what LDAP is good for, detail how to build an LDAP server, and cover what you can do with it.
Unix+clones Streaming music with SlimServer
Post date: June 15, 2005, 12:06 Category: Network Views: 72
Tutorial quote: Converting your CD collection into MP3 or another digital file format gives you the ability to enjoy the music on your computer and stream it all over the house and the Internet. To do the latter, however, you have to install and configure a streaming server on your computer. That might sound like a daunting task, but there is a streaming server application that makes the whole process pretty painless. SlimServer from Slim Devices is a cross-platform streaming server that runs on Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X and supports a wide range of formats, including AAC, AIFF, FLAC, Ogg Vorbis, MP3, WAV, and WMA. Although it was developed to stream music files to Slim Devices' Squeezebox2 hardware player, it works perfectly with any software MP3 player capable of working with network streams.
RedHat My First Linux Server, Part 1
Post date: April 14, 2005, 18:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 100
Tutorial quote: Many small businesses are turning to Linux as way to swim against the tide of rising software costs. Are you thinking about diving into Linux for your small business? From the outside, Linux can appear to be a deep ocean of strange jargon in unchartered waters. Who has the time to wade through all that to save a few clams? With Linux, it's not a sink or swim proposition.

Linux is now a lot simpler than you may think. We can provide you with the easiest, simplest, no-problem process for installing Linux on a PC. After going through this simple installation process, you will have a basic machine that you can configure into any kind of server, workstation, or office desktop. Future articles in this My First Linux Server series will help you build productive, Linux-based servers and small office workstations.

The best choices for your first Linux machine are probably the popular Red Hat Linux or SUSE Linux, primarily because both are easy to install and configure. Additionally, these companies are sound choices for the home office or small business. Both vendors have specialized in Linux for many years and offer full corporate product lines supporting your expansion.