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Ubuntu SAMBA (Domaincontroller) Server For Small Workgroups With Ubuntu 5.10 "Breezy Badger"
Post date: December 14, 2005, 14:12 Category: Network Views: 148
Tutorial quote: This is a detailed description about the steps to set up a Ubuntu based server (Ubuntu 5.10 - Breezy Badger) to act as file- and print server for Windows (tm) workstations in small workgroups. This howto uses the tdb backend for SAMBA to store passwords and account information. This is suitable for workgroups for up to 250 users and is easier to setup than an LDAP backend. A second howto covering the installation of LDAP + SAMBA will be published soon.
Unix+clones Introduction to Free Pascal 2.0
Post date: May 16, 2005, 19:05 Category: Programming Views: 73
Tutorial quote: After five years of development, Free Pascal 2.0 is ready. With the new compiler, its authors believe they are ready to become a larger open source development platform. In the MS-DOS world, Pascal was one of the major programming languages and is by means of Borland Delphi an important programming language in the Windows world. In the open source world, Free Pascal is the leading Pascal compiler and while open source is a bit biased using the C language, the Pascal language has a lot to offer to open source programmers.
Unix+clones Good-looking fonts in X Windows
Post date: April 23, 2005, 05:04 Category: Desktop Views: 98
Tutorial quote: What makes the difference betweek "ugly" and "beautiful" fonts? Several things.

One of them is anti-aliasing (or AA in short). It's the technique which adds gray pixels in various shades around the edges of black text and thus blurs the jagged and pixelated edges. It works with other colors, too.

Another thing is having good quality fonts to start with. Font which are ugly by nature or don't scale well to various sizes are not much nicer when anti-aliased. See what kinds of fonts are out there by browsing through the Font HOWTO (not the same as the FDU HOWTO above).

Finally, there's the issue of readability which applies to you directly. How well does the end-product look anyhow? Do you really need anti-aliasing for an 8 pixel text? And other similar questions, which you'll learn how to answer according to your own preferences.
Unix+clones Using the GNU Privacy Guard
Post date: April 15, 2005, 20:04 Category: Software Views: 38
Tutorial quote: Tonight we will investigate the gnupg utility (version 1.07). I will be running it on an OpenBSD 3.2 system but, as usual, any unix-like system should not display any significant differences. I will assume that GPG is already installed.

The GNU Privacy Guard can be regarded as a complete replacement for the popular PGP (Pretty Good Privacy) software. The difference between the two is that GnuPG does not have any licensing restrictions and it also runs on more platforms. They are both open source products. Although owned by a commercial entity, a freeware version of PGP is available (although only for Windows and Macintosh).

In a nutshell, what all this software does is allow two parties to communicate securely. This implies the following:
- the message has arrived at its destination unaltered
- the message can only be read by its intended recipient
- the authenticity of the sender has been verified by the recipient
Gentoo Tunneling the hard way: using slirp, pppd and socat
Post date: January 29, 2006, 08:01 Category: Network Views: 50
Tutorial quote: Every now and then you might come across a "bad" ISP. The one I have at home for example is dropping UDP packets ever so often when I try to play online games -- and it tends to drop random packets while I try to log onto a gameserver too which makes a certain game I like to play crash during the loading phase so it can't recover. I also heard of other ISPs blocking certain ports on external servers -- universities for example seem to like blocking p2p network ports and the school i was attending till last august blocked everything but port 80 for http -- including ftp which made even on-topic "research" a pita at times.
Usually there's three ways of working around this problem if "giving up" is not an option to you: a) change your ISP, b) use ssh to redirect ports, c) connect to an external VPN to route for you. a) can be tricky -- it's impossible if you're sharing the link with your parents and they insist on their email addresses or in the university/workplace/school scenario. b) will only work with single port/host combinations and for c) you will need a full-fledged rootbox idling around on the internet -- which tend to be expensive and "virtual servers" might not work because those often don't include tun/tap devices and/or kernel-level ppp support if you rent them and in case you rented them you probably can't fiddle around with its kernel to enable it (that was my problem at least). If any of this rings a bell to you, read on and discover method d)
FreeBSD Lightweight Web Serving with thttpd
Post date: November 30, 2005, 19:11 Category: Software Views: 79
Tutorial quote: The Apache HTTP Server is the most popular web server due to its functionality, stability, and maturity. However, this does not make it suitable for all uses: slow machines and embedded systems may have serious problems running it because of its size. Here is where lightweight HTTP servers come into play, as their low-memory footprints deliver decent results without having to swap data back to disk.

Similarly, these small HTTP servers are suitable to serve static content efficiently so as to allow Apache, mod_perl, mod_python, or even servlet containers to handle dynamic requests without tying up memory-hungry children to serve small images. In other words, these applications can serve as a complement to your existing full-featured web server, not as a replacement.

One of these servers is thttpd, a simple, small, portable, fast, and secure HTTP server. Among its features are support for the HTTP/1.1 standard, CGIs, virtual hosts, and IPv6. This article shows how to install and configure this software under NetBSD. I chose NetBSD not only because it is my preferred OS, but also because it has the ability to run on the most disparate old hardware, where thttpd shows its strengths. I had a Macintosh Performa 630 (a 68LC040 chip at 33MHz) running NetBSD/mac68k 2.0 with thttpd on top of it, serving pages to my home network nicely.
Linux Linux stateful firewall design
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 40
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows you how to use netfilter to set up a powerful Linux stateful firewall. All you need is an existing Linux system that's currently using a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel. A laptop, workstation, router or server with at a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel will do. You should be reasonably familiar with standard network terminology like IP addresses, source and destination port numbers, TCP, UDP and ICMP, etc. By the end of the tutorial, you'll understand how Linux stateful firewalls are put together and you'll have several example configurations to use in your own projects.
RedHat My First Linux Server, Part 1
Post date: April 14, 2005, 18:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 100
Tutorial quote: Many small businesses are turning to Linux as way to swim against the tide of rising software costs. Are you thinking about diving into Linux for your small business? From the outside, Linux can appear to be a deep ocean of strange jargon in unchartered waters. Who has the time to wade through all that to save a few clams? With Linux, it's not a sink or swim proposition.

Linux is now a lot simpler than you may think. We can provide you with the easiest, simplest, no-problem process for installing Linux on a PC. After going through this simple installation process, you will have a basic machine that you can configure into any kind of server, workstation, or office desktop. Future articles in this My First Linux Server series will help you build productive, Linux-based servers and small office workstations.

The best choices for your first Linux machine are probably the popular Red Hat Linux or SUSE Linux, primarily because both are easy to install and configure. Additionally, these companies are sound choices for the home office or small business. Both vendors have specialized in Linux for many years and offer full corporate product lines supporting your expansion.
RedHat Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4
Post date: July 18, 2005, 18:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 176
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.
Linux Optimizing Linux filesystems
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 118
Tutorial quote: Last time we introduced a few common Linux filesystems and examined their features. If you've already installed Linux, your partitions are already set up and configured with particular filesystems, but you may decide you want to modify this configuration. What's the best way to begin?