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Search results for Application optimization with compilers for Linux on POWER

Linux Application optimization with compilers for Linux on POWER
Post date: May 23, 2005, 12:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 56
Tutorial quote: The Linux on POWER platform offers more than one option to produce binary C/C++ code. In addition to supporting both 32- and 64-bit runtime environments simultaneously, Linux on POWER has two compiler collections. The GNU Compiler Collection, or GCC, is consistent with other Linux implementations with specific exceptions for the POWER architecture. GCC is the leading compiler for portability but also features a number of performance enhancements for optimizing code. The IBM XL C/C++ compiler for Linux on POWER is derived from the high performance compiler for AIX but uses the GNU linker and assembler to create ELF objects that are fully compatible with objects produced by GCC. This document provides side-by-side comparisons of how these two compilers are controlled, overviews of what the compilers are capable of, in terms of optimization, and tips for writing code that is more easily optimized with either of these compilers.
Unix+clones Performance Tuning with GCC, Part 1
Post date: November 25, 2005, 20:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 46
Tutorial quote: This article provides an overview of the different flags controlling optimization in GCC and some hints on how to use them to get the most performance out of your application. In particular, it discusses some of the new optimization features of the GCC 4.x series included in Fedora™ Core 4 and the upcoming Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® versions.
Unix+clones Writing Shell Scripts
Post date: April 12, 2005, 22:04 Category: Programming Views: 41
Tutorial quote: With the thousands of commands available for the command line user, how can you remember them all? The answer is, you don't. The real power of the computer is its ability to do the work for you. To get it to do that, we use the power of the shell to automate things. We write scripts.
Linux Automating Builds on Linux
Post date: April 12, 2005, 20:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 41
Tutorial quote: An automated nightly build is a process for building an application every night using an infrastructure that automatically executes the required steps at the scheduled time, without any human intervention. A well-planned build process not only builds your application, but also provides you and your team with early detection of incompatible changes in the application components and early detection of errors introduced by newly integrated code. When configured and used properly, automated builds are a critical component for ensuring that the application satisfies quality requirements and continues to run as expected.
Fedora+Core Building a Linux cluster on a budget
Post date: November 18, 2005, 14:11 Category: Network Views: 140
Tutorial quote: So you need a lot of computing power but don't want to spend tens of thousands of dollars on a commercial cluster? Or maybe you just have a lot of machines sitting idle that you would like to put to good use? You can build a powerful and scalable Linux cluster using only free software and off-the-shelf components. Here's how.
Unix+clones Optimizing C/C++ programs using the GProf profiler
Post date: May 24, 2005, 14:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 69
Tutorial quote: One of the most important things to keep in mind while optimizing an application is: optimize where it counts. It is no use to spend hours optimizing a piece of code that usually runs for only 0.04 seconds anyway.

GProf provides a surprisingly easy way to profile your C/C++ application and spot the interesting pieces right away. A small case study shows how GProf was used to reduce the running time of a real-world application from over 3 minutes to under 5 seconds, by identifying 2 data structures as important and optimizing those.

Historically, the program goes back as far as 1982, when it was introduced on the the SIGPLAN Symposium on Compiler Construction. It is now a standard tool available on virtually all flavors of UNIX.
Unix+clones DNS name serving through NSD
Post date: July 5, 2005, 02:07 Category: Network Views: 80
Tutorial quote: Given the sheer importance of name servers in providing Domain Name System (DNS) resolution -- a process used by every Web-facing application to translate domain names into IP addresses and vice versa -- not many people put much thought into the available software alternatives for pulling off this feat. One compelling application is NSD, an alternative to the widely deployed BIND name server.
Linux DOS Emulation Under Linux
Post date: May 1, 2005, 13:05 Category: Emulation Views: 71
Tutorial quote: Whether you need to run some legacy corporate application, or just want to play some of those old classic DOS games, it's easy to get going.

I've done this on a Slackware 9.1 Linux system with a 2.4.22 kernel, running KDE 3.1.4. The process should be very similar for most reasonably recent Linux distros.
Yellow+Dog Installing Linux on the Mac mini
Post date: May 11, 2005, 08:05 Category: Installing Views: 112
Tutorial quote: The Mac mini is an ideal low-cost, high-performance PowerPC development platform for numerous applications. Learn how to install and configure Linux on the mini. Future articles will add the software required to make it into a stand-alone multimedia appliance.

This short series of articles shows you how to take a conveniently inexpensive, high-end PowerPC® platform (specifically, an Apple Mac mini) and build it into a home multimedia appliance using Linux™. At the end of the series, you'll have a stand-alone device that can play slide shows of images, audio, and movies, and that is controlled and administered from another machine using a standard Web browser.

The PowerPC platform is very well-suited to this type of multimedia application, and the G4 with AltiVec used in the Mac mini is an exceptionally powerful and flexible choice. This first article introduces you to the hardware's capabilities and walks you through installing and configuring Yellow Dog Linux so you can delve into some application code in the next article.
Linux How to play DVDs on any x86 GNU/Linux distro
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 76
Tutorial quote: My folks recently bought and sent me two DVDs, but the only DVD player I have is in my Linux-based computer. Using the free software application MPlayer, I was able to watch my videos. I'll walk you through the easy steps required.