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Search results for Application optimization with compilers for Linux on POWER

Unix+clones Comparing MySQL performance
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 57
Tutorial quote: With the introduction of the 2.6 Linux kernel, FreeBSD-5-STABLE, Solaris 10, and now NetBSD 2.0, you might be wondering which of them offers superior database performance. In my previous article, I discussed the tools I chose to test these venerable operating systems and the methodology by which they were tested. The result is this MySQL performance comparison between OpenBSD 3.6; NetBSD 2.0; FreeBSD 5.3 and 4.10; Solaris Express (build 69); and Linux 2.4 and 2.6 (Gentoo-based). Read on for the results.
Linux Linux Web Filtering in 7 steps
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Network Views: 423
Tutorial quote: How to install a transparent Squid proxy server with real-time HTTP virus scanning on Mandrake 10.0 using DansGuardian and ClamAV?

People quickly and easily access volumes of research on the Internet and correspond with a mouse click. For more and more companies, content filtering is part of the large battle to combat all kinds of online threats, including hackers, worms and viruses. Linux content filtering allows administrators to configure and manage Internet access across the entire network and to block unwanted Web content like pornography, shopping Web sites, games and gambling.

This guide contains all the necessary information for installing and understanding the architectural layout of the implementation. It was written with the assumption that you understand how to install programs and have a basic understanding of Linux Mandrake. This includes installing Linux Mandrake and RPM packages, editing files, making directories, compiling software and understanding general UNIX commands. This guide doesn’t explain how to use or configure Squid, DansGuardian and ClamAV but information on where to obtain this information can be found in the “Additional information” section.
Unix+clones Xen Disk I/O benchmarking: NetBSD dom0 vs Linux dom0
Post date: April 21, 2005, 06:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 107
Tutorial quote: Xen is a relatively new technology to enable several virtual machines (domU) to run on one computer. The purpose of this article is to determine what operating system (NetBSD or Linux) should be selected as domain 0 (dom0) operating system to get the best performance when running several CPU and disk intensive virtual machines at the same time.
OpenSUSE Hacking OpenSUSE
Post date: December 3, 2005, 12:12 Category: System Views: 133
Tutorial quote: There's more to SUSE Linux than simply installing it and going to work. To get the most from the operating system, you'll probably want to do some post-install fine tuning. This article by Jem Matzan explains how to: add download sources to YaST; install the Mozilla Thunderbird email client; add support for Java, Flash, Acrobat, Windows Media, MP3s, and RealMedia; play DVDs -- and more. It serves as a useful supplement to Steven J. Rosen's excellent how-to, "Installing SUSE Linux 10 on a Laptop," recently published here on DesktopLinux.com. Enjoy . . . !
Unix+clones Encrypted NFS with OpenSSH
Post date: May 21, 2005, 15:05 Category: Network Views: 44
Tutorial quote: NFS is a widely deployed, mature, and understood protocol that allows computers to share files over a network. The main problems with NFS are that it relies on the inherently insecure UDP protocol, transactions are not encrypted, hosts and users cannot be easily authenticated, and its difficulty in firewalling. This article provides a solution to most of these problems for Linux clients and servers. These principles may also be applied to any UNIX server with ssh installed. This article assumes basic knowledge of NFS and firewalling for Linux.
SuSe Working with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9
Post date: June 22, 2005, 05:06 Category: System Views: 130
Tutorial quote: Working with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) requires an understanding of the login process, including local account files, system accounts, and managing identities.

Using a console shell or the graphical environment are two possible methods of working on a SLES machine.

Finding your way around a SLES installation requires an in-depth knowledge of the filesystem layout. Essential filesystem components are documented and explained in this chapter. Basic filesystem permissions are also described.
Linux Grub From the Ground Up
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Software Views: 39
Tutorial quote: Grub is a world-class boot loader with insufficient documentation. In many ways it blows the doors of LILO. For instance, it's MUCH easier to use Knoppix to rebuild a grub boot loader than to rebuild a LILO boot loader. However, until you're comfortable with grub, it might seem just the opposite. All too often grub dumps you at a grub> prompt with no hint of what you should do. You might have heard that a successful reboot is just three commands away, but which commands? The state of grub's documentation is such that you can't figure it out unless you already know grub.

That catch 22 is the very purpose of this document. This document will to give you enough grub expertise that you can create a grub boot floppy on a working machine with grub installed (not necessarily as the bootloader, just installed), and use that floppy to bust back into a Linux machine with a blown bootloader, and then use that floppy to actually install grub as the bootloader.

This document does not discuss using grub to boot or dual boot Windows, mach, BSD, or other non-Linux operating systems. I might write on that subject later. But in the meantime, once you're familiar with the principles and practices of grub, given some study of existing documentation you'll probably be able to use grub to boot non-Linux operating systems.
Linux Creating Really Teensy ELF Executables for Linux
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 34
Tutorial quote: If you're a programmer who's become fed up with software bloat, then may you find herein the perfect antidote.

This document explores methods for squeezing excess bytes out of simple programs. (Of course, the more practical purpose of this document is to describe a few of the inner workings of the ELF file format and the Linux operating system. But hopefully you can also learn something about how to make really teensy ELF executables in the process.)

Please note that the information and examples given here are, for the most part, specific to ELF executables on a Linux platform running under an Intel-386 architecture. I imagine that a good bit of the information is applicable to other ELF-based Unices, but my experiences with such are too limited for me to say with certainty.

The assembly code that appears in this document is written for use with Nasm. (Besides being more appropriate for our needs, Nasm's syntax beats the hell out of AT&T syntax for anyone who learned x86 assembly language before learning to use Gas.) Nasm is freely available and extremely portable; see http://nasm.sourceforge.net/.

Please also note that if you aren't a little bit familiar with assembly code, you may find parts of this document sort of hard to follow.
Debian dmcrypt
Post date: January 25, 2006, 17:01 Category: Security Views: 85
Tutorial quote: Device-mapper is a new infrastructure in the Linux 2.6 kernel that provides a generic way to create virtual layers of block devices that can do different things on top of real block devices like striping, concatenation, mirroring, snapshotting, etc... The device-mapper is used by the LVM2 and EVMS 2.x tools. dm-crypt is such a device-mapper target that provides transparent encryption of block devices using the new Linux 2.6 cryptoapi. Writes to this device will be encrypted and reads decrypted. You can mount your filesystem on it as usual. But without the key you can't access your data. It does basically the same as cryptoloop only that it's a much cleaner code and better suits the need of a block device and has a more flexible configuration interface. The on-disk format is also compatible.
Debian Building A Virtual Server (VPS) With Debian 3.1 (Sarge) And OpenVZ
Post date: March 20, 2006, 15:03 Category: System Views: 36
Tutorial quote: In this HowTo I will describe the steps to be taken to prepare a server for OpenVZ virtual machines on Debian 3.1 (Sarge) 32Bit Linux. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project. OpenVZ is the open-source branch of Virtuozzo, a commercial virtualization solution used by many providers that offer virtual servers. The OpenVZ kernal patch is licensed under the GPL license, and the user-level tools are under the QPL license.