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Search results for Automating new Debian installations with preseeding

Ubuntu Windows to Ubuntu Transition Guide
Post date: April 8, 2006, 11:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 84
Tutorial quote: Alright, so you have successfully installed Ubuntu Linux, but now what do you do with it? You are in the right place. I am going to get you started with a guide on how to use your new Ubuntu system. This transition guide is targeted at existing Windows users and will show you how to do program installations, a little system configuration, but primarily highlight some Windows "replacement" programs for common applications you can't live without. This guide's intent is to introduce you to equivalent programs to what you are accustomed to and, hopefully, to cover a good amount of what you might want in a new install. I am basing the content on what I have personally experienced, email feedback from my installation article, questions from the PC Mech Forums, and common topics from the Ubuntu Forums. Hopefully this will answer a lot of questions you may have before you ever have them.
Debian Using Samba on Debian Linux
Post date: February 2, 2006, 20:02 Category: Network Views: 58
Tutorial quote: This article will show you how to install Samba 3.X on Debian Linux 3.1 (Sarge) and make it authenticate against a Windows server running Active Directory. It is not intended on replacing the actual official Samba 3 manual - which is a quite good read anyway.
Debian Debian Kernel Compile Howto (Kernel 2.6)
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: System Views: 93
Tutorial quote: In some cases you might want to compile your own kernel that suits your needs better than the standard kernel that comes with your distribution. I will describe how to do this on a Debian machine. Please note that this tutorial is for kernel 2.6 only!
Debian Creating .deb-Packages With Checkinstall
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 48
Tutorial quote: Checkinstall is a nice tool to create simple .deb-packages that you can use in your local network (e.g. if you have to install the same piece of software on multiple computers running Debian). It lets you compile and install software from the sources like before, but with the difference that you end up with a simple Debian package which also means that you can easily uninstall the software you just compiled by running dpkg -r!

I will demonstrate the use of checkinstall by compiling and installing the anti-virus software ClamAV on a Debian system.

This howto is meant as a practical guide; it does not cover the theoretical backgrounds. They are treated in a lot of other documents in the web.
Fedora+Core Enhancing Apache with mod_security
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Security Views: 93
Tutorial quote: Like probably quite a few of you, I run and admin some websites (some for fun, some for work), and as many of you surely do, some of these websites are mounted on a CMS. CMS are not the 8th wonder of the world, however some of them are pretty good, and they save you a lot of time by automating tons of tasks... however, as in every piece of code there exists, all of them are insecure and buggy (in fact, every piece of software is insecure and buggy to a degree)

So, searching for tools and ways to prevent people from breaking into my site without authorization, I began my search and found a great piece of software: mod_security for Apache.
Linux Automating Builds on Linux
Post date: April 12, 2005, 20:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 41
Tutorial quote: An automated nightly build is a process for building an application every night using an infrastructure that automatically executes the required steps at the scheduled time, without any human intervention. A well-planned build process not only builds your application, but also provides you and your team with early detection of incompatible changes in the application components and early detection of errors introduced by newly integrated code. When configured and used properly, automated builds are a critical component for ensuring that the application satisfies quality requirements and continues to run as expected.
Debian Samba ADS integration without Kerberos
Post date: May 7, 2006, 02:05 Category: Network Views: 6
Tutorial quote: Aim: Allow Debian Sarge box to join ADS domain without using Kerberos and create user accounts on the fly. The resulting Debian system should work for NT Domain users for most or all services being offered, with the same username and password without having to type the domain in each time.
Debian Ruby on Rails on Debian
Post date: January 10, 2006, 12:01 Category: Network Views: 65
Tutorial quote: Most of you have probably heard of Ruby on Rails and may be wondering what exactly it does and how you can try it for yourself. Put simply, Rails is a web application framework that uses the model-view-controller software design pattern to allow for rapid development of web applications. This article will cover how to install Rails on Debian and how to configure it to work with Apache and a relational database of your choice.
Mepis Mepis + apt = Working On Easy Street
Post date: April 13, 2005, 15:04 Category: System Views: 103
Tutorial quote: My reasoning for combining the traditional Debian apt command with Mepis was speed and efficiency. Also, in the fine tradition of open source, I could choose to use the command line instead of the Kpackage or Mepis System Center package management screen. This is a good way to learn about Debian systems that builds confidence for new users right off the bat.

Let's see how apt works with Mepis.
Linux Automating the Login Script
Post date: April 17, 2005, 06:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 52
Tutorial quote: In a perfect world, you could spend a few weeks creating a system and the result would be a system that never required manual maintenance or modifications. Whether this ideal will ever be achieved is debatable, but it definitely won't happen in the near future. In the meantime, we still have to do things manually, even if only once in a while. When I must do things manually, I'm not usually happy about it. In fact, it usually means that there has been an emergency, so other people aren't happy about it either. In times like this, it is nice to have a consistent and efficient user interface on every machine. The information and examples presented in this article assume that you are using the bash shell. However, you can modify all of the scripts so that they work in other shells. In some cases, they might even work unmodified (like in the standard Bourne Shell [sh]). Other shells will also work, but they might have different methods for changing the prompt and creating command aliases. The principles in this article should be relatively easy to adapt to the shell of your choice.