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Search results for Automating new Debian installations with preseeding

Debian Linux virtual server on Debian Sarge
Post date: November 29, 2005, 16:11 Category: System Views: 163
Tutorial quote: Linux-VServer allows you to create virtual private servers and security contexts which operate like a normal Linux server, but allow many independent servers to be run simultaneously in one box at full speed. All services, such as ssh, mail, Web, and databases, can be started on such a VPS, without modification, just like on any real server. Each virtual server has its own user account database and root password and doesn't interfere with other virtual servers.
Debian Running Apache2 With PHP5 And PHP4 At The Same Time
Post date: February 27, 2006, 19:02 Category: Network Views: 65
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to install and configure Apache2 with PHP5 and PHP4 enabled at the same time. Because it is not possible to run both PHP5 and PHP4 as Apache modules, we must run one of them as CGI, the other one as Apache module. In this document I will use PHP5 as Apache module and PHP4 as CGI, and I will describe the setup for the Linux distributions Debian Sarge (3.1) and Ubuntu 5.10 (Breezy Badger).
Debian Installing and Configuring Exim4
Post date: February 25, 2006, 07:02 Category: Network Views: 88
Tutorial quote: Installion of Exim4 from the latest Debian GNU/Linux packages is easy. The installation is now based around debconf. If you are upgrading from a simple Exim3 configuration, you can use exim_convert4r4 to convert your configuration file to the new format. If you used the previous version of this guide, which covered Exim3, the conversion should succeed without incident. I intend to discuss configuration via debconf, including setting up local delivery to Maildir format, handling local domain email, and configuring smarthosting for outbound email.
Debian How To Set Up A Load-Balanced MySQL Cluster
Post date: March 31, 2006, 14:03 Category: Software Views: 13
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to configure a MySQL 5 cluster with three nodes: two storage nodes and one management node. This cluster is load-balanced by a high-availability load balancer that in fact has two nodes that use the Ultra Monkey package which provides heartbeat (for checking if the other node is still alive) and ldirectord (to split up the requests to the nodes of the MySQL cluster).

In this document I use Debian Sarge for all nodes. Therefore the setup might differ a bit for other distributions. The MySQL version I use in this setup is 5.0.19. If you do not want to use MySQL 5, you can use MySQL 4.1 as well, although I haven't tested it.

This howto is meant as a practical guide; it does not cover the theoretical backgrounds. They are treated in a lot of other documents in the web.
Unix+clones How To Set Up Database Replication In MySQL
Post date: December 14, 2005, 14:12 Category: Software Views: 81
Tutorial quote: This tutorial describes how to set up database replication in MySQL. MySQL replication allows you to have an exact copy of a database from a master server on another server (slave), and all updates to the database on the master server are immediately replicated to the database on the slave server so that both databases are in sync. This is not a backup policy because an accidentally issued DELETE command will also be carried out on the slave; but replication can help protect against hardware failures though.

In this tutorial I will show how to replicate the database exampledb from the master with the IP address 192.168.0.100 to a slave. Both systems (master and slave) are running Debian Sarge; however, the configuration should apply to almost all distributions with little or no modification.
Debian Using the 'snort' Intrusion Detection System
Post date: December 27, 2005, 10:12 Category: Security Views: 71
Tutorial quote: Snort is the leading open source Network Intrusion Detection System and is a valuable addition to the security framework at any site. Even if you are employing lots of preventative measures, such as firewalling, patching, etc., a detection system can give you an assurance that your defences truly are effective, or if not, will give you valuable information about what you need to improve.

Fortunately, there is a good set of snort packages for Debian which takes a lot of the tedious work out of building a useful Network Intrusion Detection System. Before we start on installation, we should review a few details about the networking satack that you're going to need to make sense of the alerts snort will generate. Impatient readers and those who are familiar with the TCP/IP suite of protocols may do now skip to the bit that says Stand alone snort.
Debian Install Oracle Database XE on Debian Sarge
Post date: May 2, 2006, 11:05 Category: Installing Views: 19
Tutorial quote: Oracle Database 10g Express Edition (Oracle Database XE) is an entry-level, small-footprint database based on the Oracle Database 10g Release 2 code base that’s free to develop, deploy, and distribute; fast to download; and simple to administer. Oracle Database XE is a great starter database for

Developers working on PHP, Java, .NET, and Open Source applications

DBAs who need a free, starter database for training and deployment

Independent Software Vendors (ISVs) and hardware vendors who want a starter database to distribute free of charge

Educational institutions and students who need a free database for their curriculum

Unix+clones SpamAssassin, ClamAV and Procmail Howto
Post date: April 15, 2005, 20:04 Category: Network Views: 44
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install SpamAssassin (for filtering SPAM) and ClamAV (for filtering viruses, trojans, worms, etc.) and how to invoke them by using procmail recipes. It is suitable for scenarios where Sendmail or Postfix deliver emails to local users. It should work (maybe with slight changes concerning paths etc.) on all *nix operating systems. I tested it on Debian Woody so far.

In the end you will have a system where Sendmail or Postfix deliver emails to a local user; the emails are passed to procmail which invokes SpamAssassin and ClamAV in order to filter the emails before they arrive in the user's inbox. However, the installation of Sendmail and Postfix are not covered in this document.

This howto is meant as a practical guide.
Debian An apt-get primer
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: System Views: 90
Tutorial quote: If any single program defines the Debian Linux project, that program is apt-get. apt-get is Debian's main tool for installing and removing software. Working with the .deb package format, apt-get offers sophisticated package management that few Red Hat Package Manager RPM-based distributions can match.

Besides the convenience, an advantage of apt-get is that it reduces the chances of falling into dependency hell, that limbo where software installation fails for lack of another piece of software, whose installation fails for lack of another piece of software, and so on. If you know how Debian's archive system works, and how to choose the sources that apt-get uses, and use a few precautions in your upgrades, then the chances are that dependency problems will never bedevil you. Should you descend into dependency hell anyway, apt-get offers useful tools for climbing out of it.
Linux Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 2
Post date: April 13, 2005, 15:04 Category: Hardware Views: 104
Tutorial quote: In Part 1 we reviewed hardware options, which wireless utilities should be present, how to use Windows drivers, and how to be open to connect to any available wireless access point. Today we'll cover configurations on Red Hat- and Debian-type systems, basic security, and hardware discovery.

Wireless connectivity can be rather overly friendly, allowing connections from anyone. This howto assumes you have a wireless access point on a LAN, which can be all wireless or mixed wired and wireless. You don't want it wide open to just any random person with a desire to snoop on your network or "borrow" your bandwidth, but you want some access controls and security. Your access point should have a unique SSID (service set identifier), WEP (wireless equivalent privacy) or WPA/WPA2 (Wi-fi protected access) set up and working, and either a DHCP server or a pool of assigned IP addresses for clients.