Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for Benchmarking BSD and Linux

Linux Keep an Eye on Your Linux Systems with Netstat
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 39
Tutorial quote: Two of the fundamental aspects of Linux system security and troubleshooting are knowing what services are running, and what connections and services are available. We're all familiar with ps for viewing active services. netstat goes a couple of steps further, and displays all available connections, services, and their status.
Debian Creating an initrd image
Post date: April 15, 2005, 19:04 Category: System Views: 75
Tutorial quote: When I started booting a box with multiple SCSI adapters, I wanted to keep the device ordering sane. I find it’s best when the boot ordering matches the order in which Linux initializes the drivers for each controller. One effective way to handle this under Debian GNU/Linux with one of the stock kernels is to create a custom initrd image.
Linux HOWTO backup your linux system using bash, tar and netcat
Post date: April 2, 2006, 18:04 Category: System Views: 28
Tutorial quote: I recently ran into the problem of not having enough hard drive space on my slackware linux laptop, but was lucky enough to have a much bigger drive sitting around from before and wanted a way to perform a hassle free seamless upgrade. i had this idea and it worked pretty well so i thought i would share it since i think it's pretty cool and only requires the use of two tools that should be included with all distributions.
Linux Bandwidth monitoring with iptables
Post date: December 27, 2005, 10:12 Category: Network Views: 63
Tutorial quote: Linux has a number of useful bandwidth monitoring and management programs. A quick search on Freshmeat.net for bandwidth returns a number of applications. However, if all you need is a basic overview of your total bandwidth usage, iptables is all you really need -- and it's already installed if you're using a Linux distribution based on the 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernels.
Fedora+Core The IPv6 Internet: Connect Today with Linux
Post date: April 12, 2005, 23:04 Category: Network Views: 86
Tutorial quote: IPv6 is a key technology and a long-term solution to build scalable, reliable, manageable, secure, and high-performance IP networks. In this article, I demonstrated how to configure a Linux machine running Fedora Core 1 to support IPv6 and connect it to the IPv6 Internet using the Freenet6 service.
Linux The Beginners Linux Guide
Post date: November 24, 2005, 18:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 74
Tutorial quote: A work in progress "The Beginners Linux Guide".
Linux Internet Sharing using a Linux box
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 43
Tutorial quote: This small how-to will walk you through sharing your internet connection using Linux box.
Linux Linux 2.6: Compiling and Installing
Post date: April 15, 2005, 18:04 Category: System Views: 55
Tutorial quote: We'll look at the process of compiling and installing a new kernel safely, without overwriting the existing kernel.

You can install as many kernels as you like on a Linux system, and select the one you want to run at boot time. This makes it easy to test different kernels, and different kernel configurations, with particular sets of hardware or applications. The wise network admin always tests new kernels before running them on production machines.
Linux Xen Virtualization and Linux Clustering, Part 1
Post date: January 21, 2006, 01:01 Category: System Views: 101
Tutorial quote: Have you heard about Xen virtualization and want to get some hands-on experience? Do you want to experiment with Linux clustering but only have a single computer to devote to the cause? If you answered yes to either of these questions, keep reading.

In this article, I briefly introduce the concepts of Xen virtualization and Linux clustering. From there, I show you how to set up multiple operating systems on a single computer using Xen and how to configure them for use with clustering. I should point out that a cluster implemented in this manner does not provide the computational power of multiple physical computers. It does, however, offer a way to prototype a cluster as well as provide a cost-effective development environment for cluster-based software. Even if you're not interested in clustering, this article gives you hands-on experience using Xen virtualization.
Yellow+Dog Installing Linux on the Mac mini
Post date: May 11, 2005, 08:05 Category: Installing Views: 112
Tutorial quote: The Mac mini is an ideal low-cost, high-performance PowerPC development platform for numerous applications. Learn how to install and configure Linux on the mini. Future articles will add the software required to make it into a stand-alone multimedia appliance.

This short series of articles shows you how to take a conveniently inexpensive, high-end PowerPC® platform (specifically, an Apple Mac mini) and build it into a home multimedia appliance using Linux™. At the end of the series, you'll have a stand-alone device that can play slide shows of images, audio, and movies, and that is controlled and administered from another machine using a standard Web browser.

The PowerPC platform is very well-suited to this type of multimedia application, and the G4 with AltiVec used in the Mac mini is an exceptionally powerful and flexible choice. This first article introduces you to the hardware's capabilities and walks you through installing and configuring Yellow Dog Linux so you can delve into some application code in the next article.