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Search results for Benchmarking Filesystems Part II

Unix+clones File Transfer Protocol
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Network Views: 31
Tutorial quote: Wake up, you goodness-to-GUI slacksters! It's time to get up and get out of that hammock and put your feet on the ground and your hands on the CLI. This week we're going to talk about data in motion. Taking a file from one place on the network. Putting it someplace else. Most often today some form of FTP, the File Transfer Protocol, is used to do those things. It's been part of the Internet since there was an Internet.
FreeBSD FreeBSD Networking Basics
Post date: April 12, 2005, 20:04 Category: Network Views: 69
Tutorial quote: Beginners to Unix-like operating systems such as FreeBSD are often stymied by their network settings. Sure, the install process may have set up your NIC for you, but where do you go to view these settings, and how do you proceed if your NIC stops working? Since networking is such an integral part of computing, this article will demonstrate how to verify, configure, and optimize your network settings.
Unix+clones OpenOffice Tips: Writer, Calc and Impress
Post date: April 14, 2005, 09:04 Category: Software Views: 34
Tutorial quote: Making the switch from Microsoft Office to OpenOffice can save you a lot of money on licensing fees, and it isn't difficult--most people get used to the changes quickly. But if you've been using MS Office for the best part of a decade and learned a few of its tricks along the way, you may find yourself baffled about how to do certain tasks in OpenOffice. Here are a few tips on using Writer, Calc and Impress.
Unix+clones Introduction to Python
Post date: April 17, 2005, 05:04 Category: Programming Views: 53
Tutorial quote: Ok, first part is going to be fairly boring, but put up with it. Im just going to go through a few reasons why you should choose Python as a language to learn. First off it free!, there is no cost involved in gettin Python, although there is a license, but this is just a standard license that goes with all free and open source software. Python is an open source language, as is the interpreter (Python is written in C).
Linux Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 1
Post date: April 13, 2005, 15:04 Category: Hardware Views: 114
Tutorial quote: Wireless hardware for Linux is a moving target. The wireless network adapter that worked fine with Linux yesterday may be released with an unsupported radio chipset today, and with no indication of the change. So buyer beware--always confirm the chipset before you buy. The good news is a lot of wireless adapters have native Linux support, and for those that don't, the NdisWrapper utility lets you use the Windows drivers on your Linux box.
Debian PostgreSQL Database Server Configuration in Debian
Post date: March 24, 2006, 12:03 Category: Software Views: 16
Tutorial quote: PostgreSQL is a fully featured object-relational database management system. It supports a large part of the SQL standard and is designed to be extensible by users in many aspects. Some of the features are: ACID transactions, foreign keys, views, sequences, subqueries, triggers, user-defined types and functions, outer joins, multiversion concurrency control. Graphical user interfaces and bindings for many programming languages are available as well.
Linux Building a Linux Cluster, Part 3: How To Get Started
Post date: April 25, 2005, 10:04 Category: Network Views: 74
Tutorial quote: In the previous two articles in this series, we examined some of the whys and whats of building Linux clusters. This article concludes our series by concentrating on the hows of cluster building. We've seen that a clustered approach to certain computing solutions can save lots of money in hardware and support costs. Now our job is to produce a method of building clusters that's repeatable and predictable—we don't want to give back our hard-won savings in project cost overruns.
OpenBSD Apache - Serving up the Web
Post date: April 11, 2006, 18:04 Category: Network Views: 19
Tutorial quote: The Apache Web Server is installed as part of the OpenBSD base system. This guide will help you configure the web server: (Apache 1.3.12 is released with OpenBSD 2.7 and 1.3.9 with OpenBSD 2.6)

To see how configurable the Apache/OpenBSD combination is we also look at allowing administrators to remotely review the server's status, we setup the system so we allow users on our system to have their own personal web-space. Of course, for the security counscious you probably want to turn some of these things off after you get things up and running.
Linux WiFi PDA Meets Linux--Part 3
Post date: May 28, 2005, 18:05 Category: Software Views: 74
Tutorial quote: Did you know that your new WiFi-equipped iPAQ can be used as a VoIP communicator? How about your Linux notebook? The program that makes it possible is called Skype and it lets you call other Skype users over the Internet for free. You can also call regular phone numbers for very competitive per-minute rates. As it turns out, Skype is available for both platforms and Windows, too. Although it's not an Open Source solution, it is freely available and fits nicely into our WiFi-PDA-meets-Linux bag of tools.

Join me now to discover how you can use the program on the iPAQ and a Linux notebook.
Linux Building an LDAP Server on Linux, Part 1
Post date: April 15, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 48
Tutorial quote: Your network is growing in size and complexity. It's taking on a life of its own, spreading and growing and absorbing everything in its path. You're tearing your hair out trying to keep track, and your users have somehow discovered your secret phone number and are pestering you with endless questions and demands--where do I find this; I don't want to keep track of a dozen different passwords; nothing works like it should.

Of several possible solutions, consider two: 1) find a new hiding place, or 2) implement an LDAP server. While finding a new hiding place might sound ideal, it's an option we're going to have to save for a future article. This series will instead explain what LDAP is good for, detail how to build an LDAP server, and cover what you can do with it.