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Search results for CD burning with a 2.6 kernel (IDE)

Linux Linux 2.6: Compiling and Installing
Post date: April 15, 2005, 18:04 Category: System Views: 55
Tutorial quote: We'll look at the process of compiling and installing a new kernel safely, without overwriting the existing kernel.

You can install as many kernels as you like on a Linux system, and select the one you want to run at boot time. This makes it easy to test different kernels, and different kernel configurations, with particular sets of hardware or applications. The wise network admin always tests new kernels before running them on production machines.
RedHat Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4
Post date: July 18, 2005, 18:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 176
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.
Ubuntu Essential house keeping in Ubuntu
Post date: December 8, 2005, 06:12 Category: System Views: 184
Tutorial quote: I started using Ubuntu Breezy ver 5.10 a month back on my machine. Prior to that I was exclusively into Fedora. What drew me to Ubuntu was the huge number of packages in its repositories including softwares which I find useful on a day-to-day basis like Tomboy which I had to compile from source in Fedora. But the Ubuntu CD comes with the base packages which support only open file formats. So if you want support for proprietary file formats like mp3 and quicktime support as well as install softwares not included on the CD, then you have to do some work.

I call it essential housekeeping because it is not exactly a problem, but only a matter of finding out how to get the necessary support. Here I share my experiences in putting the Ubuntu house in order on my machine.
Linux Building a GameCube Linux Kernel
Post date: January 23, 2006, 10:01 Category: System Views: 38
Tutorial quote: This guide explains briefly the necessary steps to produce a Linux kernel suitable for the GameCube, using a Linux PC.
Gentoo Logitech quickcam on 2.6.x kernel
Post date: April 25, 2005, 19:04 Category: Hardware Views: 82
Tutorial quote: This short tutorial explains how to get your Logitech Quickcam to work under 2.6.x kernel.
RedHat Compile 2.6 kernel for RedHat 9 and 8.0 and get Fedora Updates
Post date: April 12, 2005, 20:04 Category: System Views: 96
Tutorial quote: This tutorial walks you through compiling 2.6 kernel for RedHat 9 and 8.0 and getting Fedora Updates.
FreeBSD How to move FreeBSD from your old hard drive to a new larger drive
Post date: May 2, 2005, 08:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 104
Tutorial quote: This article will explain how you can move your FreeBSD installation from one hard disk drive to another. I have done this many times using the dump/restore utility. Before you begin, be sure you have read this document carefully.

Let's assume that our FreeBSD installation is on a 4 gigabyte drive (ide master ad0) and we would like to move it to a new 20 gig drive. .
Linux Linux stateful firewall design
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 40
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows you how to use netfilter to set up a powerful Linux stateful firewall. All you need is an existing Linux system that's currently using a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel. A laptop, workstation, router or server with at a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel will do. You should be reasonably familiar with standard network terminology like IP addresses, source and destination port numbers, TCP, UDP and ICMP, etc. By the end of the tutorial, you'll understand how Linux stateful firewalls are put together and you'll have several example configurations to use in your own projects.
OpenBSD Using OpenBSD
Post date: April 26, 2006, 10:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 23
Tutorial quote: Many people responded to the call for OpenBSD and OpenSSH donations by purchasing an OpenBSD CD set. Those CDs are beginning to arrive in the mail, and when they do, how are you going to use them? If you're a software enthusiast who has never used OpenBSD before, you might enjoy installing it by yourself and figuring it out as you go. If, however, you're looking for a more practical approach to using OpenBSD as a desktop or server operating system, here's a guide to get you started.
Linux Monitoring and Managing Linux Software RAID
Post date: April 15, 2005, 19:04 Category: System Views: 56
Tutorial quote: Systems administrators managing a data center face numerous challenges to achieve required availability and uptime. Two of the main challenges are shrinking budgets (for hardware, software, and staffing) and short deadlines in which to deliver solutions. The Linux community has developed kernel support for software RAID (Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks) to help meet those challenges. Software RAID, properly implemented, can eliminate system downtime caused by disk drive errors. The source code to the Linux kernel, the RAID modules, and the raidtools package are available at minimal cost under the GNU Public License. The interface is well documented and comprehensible to a moderately experienced Linux systems administrator.

In this article, I'll provide an overview of the software RAID implementation in the Linux 2.4.X kernel. I will describe the creation and activation of software RAID devices as well as the management of active RAID devices. Finally, I will discuss some procedures for recovering from a failed disk unit.