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Search results for Compile 2.6 kernel for RedHat 9 and 8.0 and get Fedora Updates

Linux Linux 2.6: Compiling and Installing
Post date: April 15, 2005, 18:04 Category: System Views: 55
Tutorial quote: We'll look at the process of compiling and installing a new kernel safely, without overwriting the existing kernel.

You can install as many kernels as you like on a Linux system, and select the one you want to run at boot time. This makes it easy to test different kernels, and different kernel configurations, with particular sets of hardware or applications. The wise network admin always tests new kernels before running them on production machines.
RedHat Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4
Post date: July 18, 2005, 18:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 176
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.
Linux Compiling Your Own Kernel
Post date: May 1, 2005, 13:05 Category: System Views: 50
Tutorial quote: Once I decided to take the plunge and go for it, I realised it's not too hard at all. As long as you have a bootable floppy or CD to boot from if your new kernel doesn't work, you'll be OK.

For this simple guide, I'll assume that you use LILO as your boot manager.
Linux Building a GameCube Linux Kernel
Post date: January 23, 2006, 10:01 Category: System Views: 38
Tutorial quote: This guide explains briefly the necessary steps to produce a Linux kernel suitable for the GameCube, using a Linux PC.
Gentoo Logitech quickcam on 2.6.x kernel
Post date: April 25, 2005, 19:04 Category: Hardware Views: 82
Tutorial quote: This short tutorial explains how to get your Logitech Quickcam to work under 2.6.x kernel.
Unix+clones How to Block Ads With Adzap
Post date: April 15, 2005, 17:04 Category: Network Views: 27
Tutorial quote: For some time at my workplace we've been running an ad-zapping service on our web proxy. This page documents how it works, how to use it yourself, how to join the mailing list for updates of the pattern file, and the weirdnesses of our local setup (which you need not duplicate yourself).
Fedora+Core Keeping Fedora Up to Date with Yum
Post date: April 12, 2005, 21:04 Category: System Views: 112
Tutorial quote: Yum is an automatic updater and package management tool for rpm based systems. Yum automatically computes dependencies and figures out what steps need to occur in order to install packages. It makes it much easier to maintain groups of machines without having to manually update each one using rpm.
Linux Linux stateful firewall design
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 40
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows you how to use netfilter to set up a powerful Linux stateful firewall. All you need is an existing Linux system that's currently using a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel. A laptop, workstation, router or server with at a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel will do. You should be reasonably familiar with standard network terminology like IP addresses, source and destination port numbers, TCP, UDP and ICMP, etc. By the end of the tutorial, you'll understand how Linux stateful firewalls are put together and you'll have several example configurations to use in your own projects.
Unix+clones Performance Tuning with GCC, Part 1
Post date: November 25, 2005, 20:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 46
Tutorial quote: This article provides an overview of the different flags controlling optimization in GCC and some hints on how to use them to get the most performance out of your application. In particular, it discusses some of the new optimization features of the GCC 4.x series included in Fedora™ Core 4 and the upcoming Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® versions.
Gentoo GCC extension for protecting from stack-smashing attacks
Post date: April 20, 2005, 06:04 Category: Security Views: 80
Tutorial quote: The Stack-Smashing Protector (SSP, formerly ProPolice) is perhaps one of the most sophisticated yet simplistic protective compiler technologies to date which makes use of canary values by rearranging local variables and function pointers. When (ssp) is enabled it can prevent many forms of the common return-to-libc attack. It is implemented as a patch to GCC which will automatically insert protection code into your programs at compile time. It is developed by Hiroaki Etoh at IBM.