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Search results for Configuring Apache - Don't Succumb To The "Slashdot Effect"

Unix+clones Configuring Apache - Don't Succumb To The "Slashdot Effect"
Post date: January 30, 2006, 22:01 Category: Optimizing Views: 28
Tutorial quote: Like many techno-geeks I host my LAMP website on a cheap ($150) computer and my broadband connection. I have also wondered what would happen if my site was linked on Slashdot or Digg. Specifically, would my setup be able to survive the "Slashdot Effect?" A Pentium 100mhz can easily saturate a T1's worth of bandwidth and my upload speed is capped (supposedly) at 384kbps, so the server should easily be able to handle that. My bandwidth will be saturated before the server is incapacitated, at least that's the idea.
Solaris Configuring Apache
Post date: April 13, 2005, 01:04 Category: Network Views: 81
Tutorial quote: Apache can respond to browser requests from machines on your local network (i.e. an "Intranet" Web server) or from the Internet. The installation of the Solaris OS installed and set up most of the necessary Apache files. As a result, if you want to use your system as a Web server you only need to modify one file.
Unix+clones Configuring Apache for Maximum Performance
Post date: February 12, 2006, 04:02 Category: Optimizing Views: 37
Tutorial quote: Apache is an open-source HTTP server implementation. It is the most popular web server on the Internet; the December 2005 Web Server Survey conducted by Netcraft [1] shows that about 70% of the web sites on Internet are using Apache.

Apache server performance can be improved by adding additional hardware resources such as RAM, faster CPU, etc. But most of the time, the same result can be achieved by custom configuration of the server. This article looks into getting maximum performance out of Apache with the existing hardware resources, specifically on Linux systems. Of course, it is assumed that there is enough hardware resources - especially enough RAM that the server isn't swapping frequently. First two sections look into various Compile-Time and Run-Time configuration options. The Run-Time section assumes that Apache is compiled with prefork MPM. HTTP compression and caching is discussed next. Finally, using separate servers for serving static and dynamic contents is covered. Basic knowledge of compiling and configuring Apache and Linux are assumed.
Linux Configuring Apache for Maximum Performance
Post date: March 31, 2006, 22:03 Category: Optimizing Views: 14
Tutorial quote: Apache server performance can be improved by adding additional hardware resources such as RAM, faster CPU etc. But, most of the time, the same result can be achieved by custom configuration of the server. This article looks into getting maximum performance out of Apache with the existing hardware resources, specifically on the Linux systems.
Unix+clones Apache Maintenance Basics
Post date: April 12, 2005, 21:04 Category: Software Views: 40
Tutorial quote: You've downloaded and configured your Apache server and are ready to move on to the next project. Can it really be left to fend for itself in a darkened room?

Yes. To some degree, anyway. With the exception of configuration testing, once Apache is up, you likely need never think about how the Web server is running.

On the other hand, completely ignoring your Apache installation would be foolhardy. Doing some regular checks and maintenance on your Apache installation helps identify any issues usually before they even become issues and helps you stay up date with the latest security and performance patches. This article covers some of the major steps and maintenance tasks that should be regularly undertaken while the Apache system is running.
Gentoo Quick Streaming Music without icecast
Post date: April 12, 2005, 01:04 Category: Network Views: 51
Tutorial quote: I've been looking for a quick solution to streaming my music from home without all of the messy and complicated configuration of icecast. Today I stumbled upon edna , which allows you to quickly stream your music to any other networked computer. You don't need to run apache, you don't need to spend lots of time configuring it, it does almost all of the work for you.

The install takes about 30 seconds
OpenBSD Apache - Serving up the Web
Post date: April 11, 2006, 18:04 Category: Network Views: 19
Tutorial quote: The Apache Web Server is installed as part of the OpenBSD base system. This guide will help you configure the web server: (Apache 1.3.12 is released with OpenBSD 2.7 and 1.3.9 with OpenBSD 2.6)

To see how configurable the Apache/OpenBSD combination is we also look at allowing administrators to remotely review the server's status, we setup the system so we allow users on our system to have their own personal web-space. Of course, for the security counscious you probably want to turn some of these things off after you get things up and running.
Debian How To Set Up A Loadbalanced High-Availability Apache Cluster
Post date: April 28, 2006, 02:04 Category: Network Views: 25
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up a two-node Apache web server cluster that provides high-availability. In front of the Apache cluster we create a load balancer that splits up incoming requests between the two Apache nodes. Because we do not want the load balancer to become another "Single Point Of Failure", we must provide high-availability for the load balancer, too. Therefore our load balancer will in fact consist out of two load balancer nodes that monitor each other using heartbeat, and if one load balancer fails, the other takes over silently.
RedHat RH 9.0 Apache 2.0.47 + Tomcat 4.1.27 HOWTO
Post date: April 9, 2006, 10:04 Category: Software Views: 15
Tutorial quote: Building an Apache HTTP + Tomcat environment is five major steps.
Debian Running Apache2 With PHP5 And PHP4 At The Same Time
Post date: February 27, 2006, 19:02 Category: Network Views: 65
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to install and configure Apache2 with PHP5 and PHP4 enabled at the same time. Because it is not possible to run both PHP5 and PHP4 as Apache modules, we must run one of them as CGI, the other one as Apache module. In this document I will use PHP5 as Apache module and PHP4 as CGI, and I will describe the setup for the Linux distributions Debian Sarge (3.1) and Ubuntu 5.10 (Breezy Badger).