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Gentoo HOWTO Linux Virtual Hosting Server
Post date: April 9, 2006, 10:04 Category: Software Views: 53
Tutorial quote: This document will explain how to install and configure a mail server capable of handling hundreds of domains and users. This how-to uses Postfix, Courier-imap, Mysql, and Apache as the core of this virtual system. If these packages don't appeal to you, Gentoo has a number of how-to's built around other MTA's or databases.
FreeBSD Lightweight Web Serving with thttpd
Post date: November 30, 2005, 19:11 Category: Software Views: 79
Tutorial quote: The Apache HTTP Server is the most popular web server due to its functionality, stability, and maturity. However, this does not make it suitable for all uses: slow machines and embedded systems may have serious problems running it because of its size. Here is where lightweight HTTP servers come into play, as their low-memory footprints deliver decent results without having to swap data back to disk.

Similarly, these small HTTP servers are suitable to serve static content efficiently so as to allow Apache, mod_perl, mod_python, or even servlet containers to handle dynamic requests without tying up memory-hungry children to serve small images. In other words, these applications can serve as a complement to your existing full-featured web server, not as a replacement.

One of these servers is thttpd, a simple, small, portable, fast, and secure HTTP server. Among its features are support for the HTTP/1.1 standard, CGIs, virtual hosts, and IPv6. This article shows how to install and configure this software under NetBSD. I chose NetBSD not only because it is my preferred OS, but also because it has the ability to run on the most disparate old hardware, where thttpd shows its strengths. I had a Macintosh Performa 630 (a 68LC040 chip at 33MHz) running NetBSD/mac68k 2.0 with thttpd on top of it, serving pages to my home network nicely.
Unix+clones Tunneling SSH over HTTP(S)
Post date: March 12, 2006, 04:03 Category: Network Views: 54
Tutorial quote: This document explains how to set up an Apache server and SSH client to allow tunneling SSH over HTTP(S). This can be useful on restricted networks that either firewall everything except HTTP traffic (tcp/80) or require users to use a local (HTTP) proxy.
Debian Speedup DNS requests with a local cache
Post date: April 26, 2006, 05:04 Category: Network Views: 12
Tutorial quote: One common server bottleneck is DNS lookups. Many common server tasks such as from looking up hostnames to write Apache logfiles and processing incoming mail require the use of DNS queries. If you're running a high-traffic system it might be useful to cache previous lookups.
Debian Ruby on Rails on Debian
Post date: January 10, 2006, 12:01 Category: Network Views: 65
Tutorial quote: Most of you have probably heard of Ruby on Rails and may be wondering what exactly it does and how you can try it for yourself. Put simply, Rails is a web application framework that uses the model-view-controller software design pattern to allow for rapid development of web applications. This article will cover how to install Rails on Debian and how to configure it to work with Apache and a relational database of your choice.
FreeBSD Configuring virtual domains with Cyrus+Postfix in FreeBSD 5.4
Post date: November 30, 2005, 22:11 Category: Software Views: 153
Tutorial quote: Cyrus IMAP is an efficient IMAP server capable of handling a large number of accounts. Its biggest drawback is getting it installed and configured. This tutorial is a step-by-step guide on how to use Cyrus with the Postfix mail transfer agent (MTA). I tested these instructions with FreeBSD 5.4.

Postfix is a replacement for sendmail, the stock MTA that comes in FreeBSD. It is easier to configure and manage than sendmail. If you depend on sendmail, you can still look at the article for the Cyrus part, but you'll need to look elsewhere for the MTA configuration.

Unless otherwise instructed, perform all operations in this tutorial as root. You will need to use the port system. If you are new to it, check Chapter 4 of the FreeBSD Handbook.
Debian Installing SVN with apache on debian
Post date: March 20, 2006, 15:03 Category: Software Views: 36
Tutorial quote: Today I started to set up a SVN repository for our final year project. I tried to setup a SVN server using Apache2 so that the SVN repository is available to the client through the WebDAV/DeltaV protocol. Read on for a trial-and-error introduction.

The Version Control with Subversion book (by Ben Collins-Sussman, Brian W. Fitzpatrick & C. Michael Pilato) was very useful to me when I struggled with SVN. The e-version of the book also available for free.
Linux NFS over CIPE-VPN tunnels
Post date: May 23, 2005, 12:05 Category: Network Views: 60
Tutorial quote: The Network File System (NFS) is a standard protocol for sharing file services with Linux and Unix computers. It is a distributed file system that enables local access to remote disks and file systems and is based on the client\server architecture. Although easy to configure, it is typically used only to transfer data over an intranet or LAN because of its transparency and security potholes when exposed to the risks of the Internet. However, it still can be employed -- without compromising security -- to share files over the Internet by configuring it to run on a Virtual Private Network (VPN) connection. This article will show you how to set up NFS to run over a CIPE-VPN connection between two Linux systems.
Linux How to configure a low-cost load-balanced LAMP cluster
Post date: April 25, 2006, 07:04 Category: Network Views: 23
Tutorial quote: The ubiquitous Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP/Perl/Python (LAMP) combination powers many interactive Web sites and projects. It's not at all unusual for demand to exceed the capacity of a single LAMP-powered server over time. You can take load off by moving your database to a second server, but when demand exceeds a two-server solution, it's time to think cluster.
Unix+clones A web server in a shell script
Post date: March 14, 2006, 03:03 Category: Programming Views: 30
Tutorial quote: Suppose you want to experiment a little with web pages and CGI's, but you don't want the hassle of installing the full Apache package. This quick and dirty shell script could just be what you need.

Put simply, a web server is an application that sends local text files over the network to the clients that request them. If you let another program (for example inetd) deal with the network part, the web server could be reduced to a mere cat "$filename" to stdout. Of course, the difficult part would be to extract that filename out of the HTTP request string: nothing that a Bash script cannot easily do!