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Search results for Configuring Apache for Maximum Performance

Linux Performance Tools for Optimizing Linux: Process-Specific CPU
Post date: June 1, 2005, 03:06 Category: Optimizing Views: 140
Tutorial quote: The tools to analyze the performance of applications are varied and have existed in one form or another since the early days of UNIX. It is critical to understand how an application is interacting with the operating system, CPU, and memory system to understand its performance. This chapter will help you understand where the bottleneck in your system is occuring, and how to fix it.
Debian Running Apache2 With PHP5 And PHP4 At The Same Time
Post date: February 27, 2006, 19:02 Category: Network Views: 65
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to install and configure Apache2 with PHP5 and PHP4 enabled at the same time. Because it is not possible to run both PHP5 and PHP4 as Apache modules, we must run one of them as CGI, the other one as Apache module. In this document I will use PHP5 as Apache module and PHP4 as CGI, and I will describe the setup for the Linux distributions Debian Sarge (3.1) and Ubuntu 5.10 (Breezy Badger).
Unix+clones Get More Out of Your Pipe with Apache and mod_gzip
Post date: April 14, 2005, 09:04 Category: Network Views: 41
Tutorial quote: Some Web sites seem like they are designed to annoy and alienate visitors. Teeny tiny fixed fonts, weirdo fixed page widths, ad servers on Mars, and the content won't load until the ads do, and all kinds of dynamic jiggery-pokery that does everything but quickly deliver a nice, readable page.

Webmasters who are serious about running high-performance Web servers, and who want pleased and delighted visitors, have a great tool in Apache 1.3's mod_gzip. mod_gzip compresses pages on the fly, reducing their size considerably. Depending on the types of files served, you'll see size reductions ranging from 20%- 80%, and a nice increase in server efficiency. Nothing is needed on the client side, except sane modern Web browsers like Mozilla, Firefox, Opera, Galeon, and Konqueror. Mozilla, Firefox, and Opera are nice cross-platform browsers with all kinds of neat features, so don't be afraid to standardize on one of them.
Unix+clones Behind the Scenes with Apache’s .htaccess
Post date: January 16, 2006, 00:01 Category: Software Views: 44
Tutorial quote: Although I’m a designer and not a programmer or server-side specialist, for a few years I’ve used Apache’s .htaccess to a limited degree for clients' websites, primarily for simple URL redirects and setting up custom error pages. Now that I can use Apache’s .htaccess for my own websites, I’ve been immersed in learning more about how to use this powerful tool conservatively but effectively to redirect URLs and to combat spammers and bad bots. Today’s post provides links to some of the online sources that I’ve found especially helpful.
Gentoo Apache with mpm-worker + PHP 5 + SSL + MySQL 4.1
Post date: June 5, 2005, 18:06 Category: Network Views: 125
Tutorial quote: We can do Apache 2 with mpm-worker with PHP 5, along with SSL and MySQL 4.1. I tested my configuration with Apache 2.0.53, PHP 5.0.4, and MySQL 4.1.11.
Debian Installing and Configuring Exim4
Post date: February 25, 2006, 07:02 Category: Network Views: 88
Tutorial quote: Installion of Exim4 from the latest Debian GNU/Linux packages is easy. The installation is now based around debconf. If you are upgrading from a simple Exim3 configuration, you can use exim_convert4r4 to convert your configuration file to the new format. If you used the previous version of this guide, which covered Exim3, the conversion should succeed without incident. I intend to discuss configuration via debconf, including setting up local delivery to Maildir format, handling local domain email, and configuring smarthosting for outbound email.
Unix+clones Using MySQL to benchmark OS performance
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 93
Tutorial quote: It seems to be an exciting time for *nix operating systems, with a number of them recently releasing new versions that bring the addition of expanded features and claims of improved performance. If you're using GNU/Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD, or Solaris as a database server, you've probably recently considered an upgrade or switch to another OS in that list due to marketing hype and hearsay. This article will show you how to benchmark operating system performance using MySQL on these OSes so you can find out for yourself if you're missing out. While this may not necessarily be indicative of overall system performance or overall database application performance, it will tell you specifically how well MySQL performs on your platform.

The following operating systems were used for the comparison testing:
- FreeBSD 4.11
- FreeBSD 5.3
- NetBSD 2.0
- Linux 2.6
- Linux 2.4
- Solaris 10 x86 (build 69)
- OpenBSD 3.6
Linux Chrooting Apache
Post date: April 12, 2005, 20:04 Category: Security Views: 49
Tutorial quote: The chroot daemon allows you to run a program and have it see a given directory as the root (/) directory. This effectively locks the process into its very own filesystem ("chroot jail") isolated from the real / filesystem. In this article we will look at how to install the Apache Web server in such an environment.
OSX Optimizing Mac OS X performance
Post date: January 18, 2006, 11:01 Category: Optimizing Views: 58
Tutorial quote: This FAQ provides recommendations for optimizing MacŪ OS X performance. Additionally, it provides advice and links to advice for troubleshooting certain Mac OS X performance problems.
Unix+clones Comparing MySQL performance
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 57
Tutorial quote: With the introduction of the 2.6 Linux kernel, FreeBSD-5-STABLE, Solaris 10, and now NetBSD 2.0, you might be wondering which of them offers superior database performance. In my previous article, I discussed the tools I chose to test these venerable operating systems and the methodology by which they were tested. The result is this MySQL performance comparison between OpenBSD 3.6; NetBSD 2.0; FreeBSD 5.3 and 4.10; Solaris Express (build 69); and Linux 2.4 and 2.6 (Gentoo-based). Read on for the results.