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Debian Setting up an SSL server with Apache2
Post date: February 12, 2006, 02:02 Category: Network Views: 54
Tutorial quote: With the introduction of the Apache2 packages in Debian it is much simpler to create and use a secure SSL protected webserver than in the old days with Apache 1.3, here we'll show how it is done.
RedHat Tips & tricks: Performance tuning
Post date: November 25, 2005, 19:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 134
Tutorial quote: Advanced tips on optimizing your Red Hat server.
Linux Application optimization with compilers for Linux on POWER
Post date: May 23, 2005, 12:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 56
Tutorial quote: The Linux on POWER platform offers more than one option to produce binary C/C++ code. In addition to supporting both 32- and 64-bit runtime environments simultaneously, Linux on POWER has two compiler collections. The GNU Compiler Collection, or GCC, is consistent with other Linux implementations with specific exceptions for the POWER architecture. GCC is the leading compiler for portability but also features a number of performance enhancements for optimizing code. The IBM XL C/C++ compiler for Linux on POWER is derived from the high performance compiler for AIX but uses the GNU linker and assembler to create ELF objects that are fully compatible with objects produced by GCC. This document provides side-by-side comparisons of how these two compilers are controlled, overviews of what the compilers are capable of, in terms of optimization, and tips for writing code that is more easily optimized with either of these compilers.
OSX Enhancing Performance Of Mac OS X
Post date: December 29, 2005, 09:12 Category: Optimizing Views: 61
Tutorial quote: There are certain things that would help Mac OS X perform well and be more responsive (you could say 'snappy'). Here are some ways to eliminate the typical bottlenecks.
Debian Configuring Dynamic DNS & DHCP on Debian Stable
Post date: February 2, 2006, 20:02 Category: Network Views: 55
Tutorial quote: For the average home computer user there is no need to install a complex package such as the Internet Software Consortium's BIND DNS or DHCP server, since there are far simpler lower resource tools to use, for example dnsmasq. For those who you wish to learn how to use ISC's BIND and DHCP, for example as a learning exercise, this is how I got it all to work in Debian Sarge, the current stable version of Debian GNU/Linux.

This short article was prompted by my question on the Debian-Administration forum site, where I was able to get some answers to the issues I faced and I did promise to post a solution if I got one.
Linux Configure Multiple Network Profiles on Linux
Post date: April 12, 2005, 22:04 Category: Network Views: 30
Tutorial quote: Mobile Linux users face some interesting (OK, vexing) challenges when they want to plug into different networks. Any Linux system will easily support all manner of networking profiles--dialup, ISDN, Ethernet, wireless--the tricky bit is configuration. Manually re-configuring a PC for every connection is low on most users' lists of "fun things to do." You can be an ace scripting guru and fiddle up something yourself, or you can find a nice ready-made utility to do the work for you. Unfortunately, I have not found a universal utility to do this. However, there are a lot of utilities specific to various distributions, and an assortment of other utilities.
Gentoo HOWTO Linux Virtual Hosting Server
Post date: April 9, 2006, 10:04 Category: Software Views: 53
Tutorial quote: This document will explain how to install and configure a mail server capable of handling hundreds of domains and users. This how-to uses Postfix, Courier-imap, Mysql, and Apache as the core of this virtual system. If these packages don't appeal to you, Gentoo has a number of how-to's built around other MTA's or databases.
FreeBSD Lightweight Web Serving with thttpd
Post date: November 30, 2005, 19:11 Category: Software Views: 79
Tutorial quote: The Apache HTTP Server is the most popular web server due to its functionality, stability, and maturity. However, this does not make it suitable for all uses: slow machines and embedded systems may have serious problems running it because of its size. Here is where lightweight HTTP servers come into play, as their low-memory footprints deliver decent results without having to swap data back to disk.

Similarly, these small HTTP servers are suitable to serve static content efficiently so as to allow Apache, mod_perl, mod_python, or even servlet containers to handle dynamic requests without tying up memory-hungry children to serve small images. In other words, these applications can serve as a complement to your existing full-featured web server, not as a replacement.

One of these servers is thttpd, a simple, small, portable, fast, and secure HTTP server. Among its features are support for the HTTP/1.1 standard, CGIs, virtual hosts, and IPv6. This article shows how to install and configure this software under NetBSD. I chose NetBSD not only because it is my preferred OS, but also because it has the ability to run on the most disparate old hardware, where thttpd shows its strengths. I had a Macintosh Performa 630 (a 68LC040 chip at 33MHz) running NetBSD/mac68k 2.0 with thttpd on top of it, serving pages to my home network nicely.
Unix+clones Tunneling SSH over HTTP(S)
Post date: March 12, 2006, 04:03 Category: Network Views: 54
Tutorial quote: This document explains how to set up an Apache server and SSH client to allow tunneling SSH over HTTP(S). This can be useful on restricted networks that either firewall everything except HTTP traffic (tcp/80) or require users to use a local (HTTP) proxy.
Unix+clones Tune and Tweak NFS for Top Performance
Post date: June 25, 2005, 20:06 Category: Optimizing Views: 118
Tutorial quote: As promised in our previous NFS article, we will now explore mount options in a bit more detail. We will also talk about differences between NFS implementations among various UNIX flavors, and the wonderful capability automatic mounting provides.