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Search results for Configuring Apache for Maximum Performance

Debian Speedup DNS requests with a local cache
Post date: April 26, 2006, 05:04 Category: Network Views: 12
Tutorial quote: One common server bottleneck is DNS lookups. Many common server tasks such as from looking up hostnames to write Apache logfiles and processing incoming mail require the use of DNS queries. If you're running a high-traffic system it might be useful to cache previous lookups.
Debian Ruby on Rails on Debian
Post date: January 10, 2006, 12:01 Category: Network Views: 65
Tutorial quote: Most of you have probably heard of Ruby on Rails and may be wondering what exactly it does and how you can try it for yourself. Put simply, Rails is a web application framework that uses the model-view-controller software design pattern to allow for rapid development of web applications. This article will cover how to install Rails on Debian and how to configure it to work with Apache and a relational database of your choice.
FreeBSD Configuring virtual domains with Cyrus+Postfix in FreeBSD 5.4
Post date: November 30, 2005, 22:11 Category: Software Views: 153
Tutorial quote: Cyrus IMAP is an efficient IMAP server capable of handling a large number of accounts. Its biggest drawback is getting it installed and configured. This tutorial is a step-by-step guide on how to use Cyrus with the Postfix mail transfer agent (MTA). I tested these instructions with FreeBSD 5.4.

Postfix is a replacement for sendmail, the stock MTA that comes in FreeBSD. It is easier to configure and manage than sendmail. If you depend on sendmail, you can still look at the article for the Cyrus part, but you'll need to look elsewhere for the MTA configuration.

Unless otherwise instructed, perform all operations in this tutorial as root. You will need to use the port system. If you are new to it, check Chapter 4 of the FreeBSD Handbook.
Linux Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part I
Post date: May 16, 2005, 19:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 76
Tutorial quote: If you have complained about the speed of OpenOffice.org or Firefox or about the amount of time Linux takes to boot up, this set of optimizations should change your perception. Linux can boot up quickly, the word processor can spring open and the browser can fly. So, let's make these adjustments so your computer can fly.
Debian Installing SVN with apache on debian
Post date: March 20, 2006, 15:03 Category: Software Views: 36
Tutorial quote: Today I started to set up a SVN repository for our final year project. I tried to setup a SVN server using Apache2 so that the SVN repository is available to the client through the WebDAV/DeltaV protocol. Read on for a trial-and-error introduction.

The Version Control with Subversion book (by Ben Collins-Sussman, Brian W. Fitzpatrick & C. Michael Pilato) was very useful to me when I struggled with SVN. The e-version of the book also available for free.
Linux NFS over CIPE-VPN tunnels
Post date: May 23, 2005, 12:05 Category: Network Views: 60
Tutorial quote: The Network File System (NFS) is a standard protocol for sharing file services with Linux and Unix computers. It is a distributed file system that enables local access to remote disks and file systems and is based on the client\server architecture. Although easy to configure, it is typically used only to transfer data over an intranet or LAN because of its transparency and security potholes when exposed to the risks of the Internet. However, it still can be employed -- without compromising security -- to share files over the Internet by configuring it to run on a Virtual Private Network (VPN) connection. This article will show you how to set up NFS to run over a CIPE-VPN connection between two Linux systems.
Linux How to configure a low-cost load-balanced LAMP cluster
Post date: April 25, 2006, 07:04 Category: Network Views: 23
Tutorial quote: The ubiquitous Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP/Perl/Python (LAMP) combination powers many interactive Web sites and projects. It's not at all unusual for demand to exceed the capacity of a single LAMP-powered server over time. You can take load off by moving your database to a second server, but when demand exceeds a two-server solution, it's time to think cluster.
OSX Panther versus Tiger
Post date: April 29, 2005, 20:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 106
Tutorial quote: According to Apple, "...unmodified applications that use the system math functions will get an automatic performance boost on the G5..." when switching from Panther to Tiger. We decided to run some tests to see if we got a speed gain right out of the box with applications that we suspect use system math functions.
Fedora+Core The IPv6 Internet: Connect Today with Linux
Post date: April 12, 2005, 23:04 Category: Network Views: 86
Tutorial quote: IPv6 is a key technology and a long-term solution to build scalable, reliable, manageable, secure, and high-performance IP networks. In this article, I demonstrated how to configure a Linux machine running Fedora Core 1 to support IPv6 and connect it to the IPv6 Internet using the Freenet6 service.
Unix+clones Benchmarking BSD and Linux
Post date: June 18, 2005, 18:06 Category: Benchmarks Views: 99
Tutorial quote: These benchmarks are the result of my scalable network programming research. My interest in this area is to see how scalable and fast network applications can be on standard PC hardware.

I have done most of my research on Linux 2.4, 2.5 and 2.6 kernels using a home-grown distribution I affectionately call "Leanux". I have experimented with several APIs and methods to try and get the most scalability and performance out of a web server. The ultimate goal, however, is to demonstrate scalability by surviving a Slashdotting.