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Search results for Configuring Sendmail

Solaris Configuring Sendmail
Post date: April 12, 2005, 23:04 Category: Network Views: 89
Tutorial quote: Sendmail has the reputation of having the most hideous configuration file in the history of mankind. It's extremely long and incredibly cryptic. However, it is this very complexity that has made it the most popular MTA (Mail Transport Agent) on the Internet. Its' flexibility allows sendmail to handle the most demanding, disjointed mail routing and serving configurations you can dream up.
FreeBSD Configuring virtual domains with Cyrus+Postfix in FreeBSD 5.4
Post date: November 30, 2005, 22:11 Category: Software Views: 152
Tutorial quote: Cyrus IMAP is an efficient IMAP server capable of handling a large number of accounts. Its biggest drawback is getting it installed and configured. This tutorial is a step-by-step guide on how to use Cyrus with the Postfix mail transfer agent (MTA). I tested these instructions with FreeBSD 5.4.

Postfix is a replacement for sendmail, the stock MTA that comes in FreeBSD. It is easier to configure and manage than sendmail. If you depend on sendmail, you can still look at the article for the Cyrus part, but you'll need to look elsewhere for the MTA configuration.

Unless otherwise instructed, perform all operations in this tutorial as root. You will need to use the port system. If you are new to it, check Chapter 4 of the FreeBSD Handbook.
Unix+clones SpamAssassin, ClamAV and Procmail Howto
Post date: April 15, 2005, 20:04 Category: Network Views: 44
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install SpamAssassin (for filtering SPAM) and ClamAV (for filtering viruses, trojans, worms, etc.) and how to invoke them by using procmail recipes. It is suitable for scenarios where Sendmail or Postfix deliver emails to local users. It should work (maybe with slight changes concerning paths etc.) on all *nix operating systems. I tested it on Debian Woody so far.

In the end you will have a system where Sendmail or Postfix deliver emails to a local user; the emails are passed to procmail which invokes SpamAssassin and ClamAV in order to filter the emails before they arrive in the user's inbox. However, the installation of Sendmail and Postfix are not covered in this document.

This howto is meant as a practical guide.
Debian Installing and Configuring Exim4
Post date: February 25, 2006, 07:02 Category: Network Views: 88
Tutorial quote: Installion of Exim4 from the latest Debian GNU/Linux packages is easy. The installation is now based around debconf. If you are upgrading from a simple Exim3 configuration, you can use exim_convert4r4 to convert your configuration file to the new format. If you used the previous version of this guide, which covered Exim3, the conversion should succeed without incident. I intend to discuss configuration via debconf, including setting up local delivery to Maildir format, handling local domain email, and configuring smarthosting for outbound email.
Debian Routing mail messages to your mailserver efficiently
Post date: May 12, 2006, 08:05 Category: Network Views: 2
Tutorial quote: If you control satellite systems which need to relay their mail through a centralized host for sending then you have several choices. Perhaps the simplest software to use is the nullmailer program.

In the past we've looked at setting up exim, postfix, and sendmail forwarding but if you're not expecting to send much mail, and you don't need much processing then running a full mailserver is probably overkill.

The nullmailer package is very simple to configure and install.
Arch X11 Cursors
Post date: April 13, 2005, 21:04 Category: Desktop Views: 142
Tutorial quote: There are many cursor themes available for the X11 Windowing System besides the default black pointer.
This guide will instruct you on where to get them, installing them, and configuring them.
Unix+clones Configuring Apache for Maximum Performance
Post date: February 12, 2006, 04:02 Category: Optimizing Views: 37
Tutorial quote: Apache is an open-source HTTP server implementation. It is the most popular web server on the Internet; the December 2005 Web Server Survey conducted by Netcraft [1] shows that about 70% of the web sites on Internet are using Apache.

Apache server performance can be improved by adding additional hardware resources such as RAM, faster CPU, etc. But most of the time, the same result can be achieved by custom configuration of the server. This article looks into getting maximum performance out of Apache with the existing hardware resources, specifically on Linux systems. Of course, it is assumed that there is enough hardware resources - especially enough RAM that the server isn't swapping frequently. First two sections look into various Compile-Time and Run-Time configuration options. The Run-Time section assumes that Apache is compiled with prefork MPM. HTTP compression and caching is discussed next. Finally, using separate servers for serving static and dynamic contents is covered. Basic knowledge of compiling and configuring Apache and Linux are assumed.
Solaris Configuring networking
Post date: April 12, 2005, 23:04 Category: Network Views: 84
Tutorial quote: Networking information in Solaris is stored in text files. Configuration is done by filling in the appriopriate data to these files and invoking specific commands in a terminal window.
Linux Xen Virtualization and Linux Clustering, Part 2
Post date: January 21, 2006, 01:01 Category: System Views: 59
Tutorial quote: We ended last time after configuring our first unprivileged Xen domain. In this article, we complete our cluster and then test it using an open-source parallel ray tracer. The first thing we need to do is create additional slave nodes to be used with the cluster. So, let's get down to business.
Solaris Configuring Apache
Post date: April 13, 2005, 01:04 Category: Network Views: 81
Tutorial quote: Apache can respond to browser requests from machines on your local network (i.e. an "Intranet" Web server) or from the Internet. The installation of the Solaris OS installed and set up most of the necessary Apache files. As a result, if you want to use your system as a Web server you only need to modify one file.
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