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Search results for Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 2

Linux Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 2
Post date: April 13, 2005, 15:04 Category: Hardware Views: 104
Tutorial quote: In Part 1 we reviewed hardware options, which wireless utilities should be present, how to use Windows drivers, and how to be open to connect to any available wireless access point. Today we'll cover configurations on Red Hat- and Debian-type systems, basic security, and hardware discovery.

Wireless connectivity can be rather overly friendly, allowing connections from anyone. This howto assumes you have a wireless access point on a LAN, which can be all wireless or mixed wired and wireless. You don't want it wide open to just any random person with a desire to snoop on your network or "borrow" your bandwidth, but you want some access controls and security. Your access point should have a unique SSID (service set identifier), WEP (wireless equivalent privacy) or WPA/WPA2 (Wi-fi protected access) set up and working, and either a DHCP server or a pool of assigned IP addresses for clients.
Linux Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 1
Post date: April 13, 2005, 15:04 Category: Hardware Views: 114
Tutorial quote: Wireless hardware for Linux is a moving target. The wireless network adapter that worked fine with Linux yesterday may be released with an unsupported radio chipset today, and with no indication of the change. So buyer beware--always confirm the chipset before you buy. The good news is a lot of wireless adapters have native Linux support, and for those that don't, the NdisWrapper utility lets you use the Windows drivers on your Linux box.
OpenBSD Creating secure wireless access points with OpenBSD and OpenVPN
Post date: December 13, 2005, 13:12 Category: Network Views: 108
Tutorial quote: You know how insecure 802.11x wireless networks are. In this article we'll create an OpenBSD-based secure wireless access point that prevents unauthorized access and encrypts every packet using a VPN tunnel. OpenBSD is one of the most secure operating systems available, is easy to use, and includes almost everything you need for this project in the base installation.
IPCop Setup your own VPN with IPCop and OpenVPN
Post date: March 30, 2006, 12:03 Category: Network Views: 37
Tutorial quote: I ’m a huge fan of IPCop. It’s a great firewall distro that makes administration a snap using a slick web interface. My goal was to use IPCop and an easy-to-use VPN client to allow access to my LAN while away from home.

I ended up going with the ZERINA OpenVPN addon for IPCop and the OpenVPN GUI for Windows.

If you’ve ever wanted full, secure, encrypted access to your LAN from any remote location, here is your guide.

Just follow these ten easy steps…
FreeBSD Bluetooth Security Review, Part 1
Post date: April 29, 2005, 20:04 Category: Security Views: 65
Tutorial quote: Bluetooth (BT) wireless technology provides an easy way for a wide range of devices to communicate with each other and connect to the Internet without the need for wires, cables and connectors. The technology seams to be very interesting and beneficial, yet it can also be a high threat for the privacy and security of Bluetooth users.
Linux Setting the Clock on Linux
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: System Views: 45
Tutorial quote: There are 3 protocols dealing with time: NTP (port 123), Time (port 37), and Daytime (port 13). If you're connecting to the Internet periodically, then synchronizing your clock when you dial up or from crontab is good enough. This applies also to most Linux machines at home or at work, even if they are connected all the time. Here is a short tutorial on how to set your clock using these 3 protocols.
Linux Configure Multiple Network Profiles on Linux
Post date: April 12, 2005, 22:04 Category: Network Views: 29
Tutorial quote: Mobile Linux users face some interesting (OK, vexing) challenges when they want to plug into different networks. Any Linux system will easily support all manner of networking profiles--dialup, ISDN, Ethernet, wireless--the tricky bit is configuration. Manually re-configuring a PC for every connection is low on most users' lists of "fun things to do." You can be an ace scripting guru and fiddle up something yourself, or you can find a nice ready-made utility to do the work for you. Unfortunately, I have not found a universal utility to do this. However, there are a lot of utilities specific to various distributions, and an assortment of other utilities.
Debian Rolling your own Debian packages (part 1)
Post date: January 21, 2006, 01:01 Category: Software Views: 32
Tutorial quote: This two-part article explains how to make a Debian package of simple piece of software, presumably something you have written yourself. Although building a new package is more complex than rebuilding one or having one generated, the idea is that it is actually surprisingly simple to create basic Debian packages. In fact, if you can make software install into a temporary installation tree, you're already 90% done! This text provides a quick alternative to the more comprehensive Debian New Maintainers' Guide. Only knowledge of Makefiles and the basic Debian package tools is assumed.

The first part of this article will continue with some preliminary information about Debian packages. In the second part we walk through a concrete packaging example.
Linux NFS over CIPE-VPN tunnels
Post date: May 23, 2005, 12:05 Category: Network Views: 59
Tutorial quote: The Network File System (NFS) is a standard protocol for sharing file services with Linux and Unix computers. It is a distributed file system that enables local access to remote disks and file systems and is based on the client\server architecture. Although easy to configure, it is typically used only to transfer data over an intranet or LAN because of its transparency and security potholes when exposed to the risks of the Internet. However, it still can be employed -- without compromising security -- to share files over the Internet by configuring it to run on a Virtual Private Network (VPN) connection. This article will show you how to set up NFS to run over a CIPE-VPN connection between two Linux systems.
RedHat My First Linux Server, Part 2
Post date: April 14, 2005, 18:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 107
Tutorial quote: A file server is a specialized PC that holds large numbers of files that many people on a network can access. It "serves up" files to everyone instead of each person having files on his or her own PC. The good news is that you don't have to be a network guru to set up a basic file server. If you followed the Easy Linux Install steps in Part 1, you are ready to set up a Linux PC as a file server.

While there are many ways to set up a network and a server, this article concentrates on the simplest approaches with the highest chance of quick success.