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Search results for Convert any video file to DVD with open source tools

Unix+clones Convert any video file to DVD with open source tools
Post date: April 28, 2006, 13:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 13
Tutorial quote: You've just downloaded the new episode of your favorite video podcast, and you'd like to watch it on your big-screen TV. Unfortunately, the video is encoded in XviD or QuickTime format, which your DVD player doesn't support. Don't worry -- here's how you can convert any video file to DVD using dvdauthor and MPlayer.
Debian Mplayer Configuration
Post date: April 4, 2006, 16:04 Category: Installing Views: 17
Tutorial quote: MPlayer is a movie and animation player that supports a wide range of codecs and file formats, including MPEG 1/2/4, DivX 3/4/5, Windows Media 7/8/9, RealAudio/Video up to 9, Quicktime 5/6, and Vivo 1/2. It has many MMX/SSE(2)/3Dnow(Ex) optimized native audio and video codecs, but allows using XAnim's and RealPlayer's binary codec plugins, and Win32 codec DLLs. It has basic VCD/DVD playback functionality, including DVD subtitles, but supports many text-based subtitle formats too. For video output, nearly every existing interface is supported. It's also able to convert any supported files to raw/divx/mpeg4 AVI (pcm/mp3 audio), and even video grabbing from V4L devices.
Debian An Introduction to Video Surveillance with 'Motion'
Post date: February 6, 2006, 04:02 Category: Security Views: 58
Tutorial quote: Videochatting and amateur pornography are all well and good, but have you ever wondered what else you can do with that webcam?
Well, thanks to the efforts of many dedicated open-source coders, any half-decent PC can be turned into a motion-detecting, snapshot-making, video-recording D.I.Y. security solution.
OSX The Last iPod Video Guide You’ll Ever Need
Post date: January 10, 2006, 02:01 Category: Multimedia Views: 93
Tutorial quote: I was recently inspired to create a guide for Mac users who just got themselves a brand new iPod! We’ll go over all the options you’ve got and how to convert absolutely anything and everything: DVDs, TiVo video, messy AVIs, muxed MPEGs and more to iPod compatible video - all within OS X. Along the way, you’ll learn a couple of iPod tips and tricks, too. Don’t worry if you don’t know what a muxed MPEG is. We’ll get to that later!
Unix+clones Introduction to Free Pascal 2.0
Post date: May 16, 2005, 19:05 Category: Programming Views: 73
Tutorial quote: After five years of development, Free Pascal 2.0 is ready. With the new compiler, its authors believe they are ready to become a larger open source development platform. In the MS-DOS world, Pascal was one of the major programming languages and is by means of Borland Delphi an important programming language in the Windows world. In the open source world, Free Pascal is the leading Pascal compiler and while open source is a bit biased using the C language, the Pascal language has a lot to offer to open source programmers.
Debian Burning DVDs on Debian for Newbies
Post date: December 22, 2005, 19:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 64
Tutorial quote: DVD writers have become so common these days that there is hardly any difference between the price of a CD-writer drive and a DVD-writer drive. So I'm assuming that almost everyone would be buying a DVD writer drive these days. Below are a few tips for newbies on how to burn DVDs on a Debian box using the command line. Other GUI tools like k3b, nautilus burner, etc exists but its always fun to know how to do that stuff from command line.
Linux Today's Linux screen capture technology
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 41
Tutorial quote: "I'd like you to help me find out about video screen captures," said one of my editors a while back. "Sure, let me see what's available," I replied. He pointed me to a couple of Web sites to get me started, and here I am a few weeks later ready to share my findings. I'll discuss ways that you can make video clips in Linux, talk about their applications and shortcomings. I'll also cover suitable ways to view your masterpieces once they're recorded.

Video screen captures are useful for jobs like application training, computer instruction, or product demos. An example would be the little one-minute video I set up for my wife. She kept forgetting how to start up Mozilla Mail on her Windows 98 machine. I captured the mouse clicks and screen changes (in real time) as I ran through the process, saving it to a Macromedia Flash file. I then created a little Web page on one of my Apache servers, that described how to start Mozilla Mail and included a link to the Flash file. Instead of asking me how to do it, she can now just click on the video tutorial.
Linux Easy Linux Network Backup
Post date: April 12, 2005, 19:04 Category: Network Views: 41
Tutorial quote: If you use Linux, you already have access to extremely powerful tools for creating custom backup solutions. The solutions in this article can help you perform simple to more advanced and secure network backups using open source tools that are part of nearly every Linux distribution.
RedHat Getting started with RHEL4's built-in LVM tools
Post date: June 3, 2005, 12:06 Category: System Views: 171
Tutorial quote: Many Unix administrators I know (you know who you are), always used to smirk when I talked about Linux. They could always point to the fact that regardless of whatever I could say, they had journaling file systems, which they could manage using various Logical Volume Management (LVM) tools, and I couldn't touch that.

Well, not any more! Not only does Red Hat offer ext3 as their default file system, but they offer great management tools to boot. As we know, ext2 had a great lifespan, but it was not an enterprise-ready file system that could handle large disk partitions, fast recovery from systems crashes, or large amounts of files. Journaling file systems give you the ability to recover almost instantly from a crash, as you do not need to run fsck after a restart. Similar to how databases recover from crashes, a journaling file system tracks changes to file system metadata and pretty much guarantees that either all or no updates have completed. Of course, these file systems also need elaborate tools to help better configure and manage them accordingly.
SuSe Making a DVD from CDs
Post date: December 4, 2005, 11:12 Category: Installing Views: 137
Tutorial quote: People have requested to have a single DVD instead of the 5 CD's. The reasons for this are various. I have written a program called makeSUSEdvd that can make the DVD in a very easy manner. First download the CD's. These can be either the NOVELL SUSE CD's or the openSUSE cd's. You do not need to burn them, just put them in one directory with only the 5 CD's in it. You will need the root password. If you do not have that, the program is not good and you should do it by hand.