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Unix+clones The 'no-configuration, only-active-when-needed' SSH VPN
Post date: April 12, 2005, 23:04 Category: Network Views: 40
Tutorial quote: So, we started thinking about how we might set up a VPN between the application server and our internal software mirror. The only requirement is that the VPN be initiated from the "inside-out" and that the connection is only active for as long as we need to use. In other words, it would only be active during an administration session. Ideally, it wouldn't be a lot of work to setup and tear down either.

SSH to the rescue...

Fortunately, SSH client and server come with support for this out of the box, requiring no additional software to be installed, and no configuration changes. On the server side, sshd, the setting "AllowTcpForwarding" defaults to "yes" unless your sshd_config file explicitly disables it. On the client side, all you have to do is request the forwarding.
Ubuntu SAMBA (Domaincontroller) Server For Small Workgroups With Ubuntu 5.10 "Breezy Badger"
Post date: December 14, 2005, 14:12 Category: Network Views: 147
Tutorial quote: This is a detailed description about the steps to set up a Ubuntu based server (Ubuntu 5.10 - Breezy Badger) to act as file- and print server for Windows (tm) workstations in small workgroups. This howto uses the tdb backend for SAMBA to store passwords and account information. This is suitable for workgroups for up to 250 users and is easier to setup than an LDAP backend. A second howto covering the installation of LDAP + SAMBA will be published soon.
Gentoo Enterprise Volume Management System Mini How-To
Post date: April 13, 2005, 16:04 Category: System Views: 205
Tutorial quote: Here is a rough write-up on how I installed Gentoo 1.4_rc1 on EVMS, with the exception of the root partition. If you choose so, see the EVMS Howto for instructions on how to mount your root file system on an EVMS volume. I felt the hassle of dealing with a EVMS (or LVM, for that matter) root outweighs its advantages.

This is a very basic setup I used for my laptop. I only needed it so I don't have to worry about getting the partition sizes right from the beginning and to be able to adjust them with ease in the future. I've been using LVM with success but I couldn't find a way to resize the volume group itself. This, the fact that afaik there is no support for LVM in kernel 2.5.x and a new laptop needing a fresh installation made me try EVMS.
OpenBSD Transparent proxying with squid and pf
Post date: May 17, 2005, 04:05 Category: Network Views: 220
Tutorial quote: squid is a caching web proxy, it's set up between web browsers and servers, fetching documents from servers on behalf of browsers. It can accelerate web access by caching frequently requested pages and serving them from its cache. It can also be used to filter pop-up ads and malware or to enforce access control (which clients may request what pages based on different authentication methods).

Traditionally, the proxy is an optional component, and browsers are configured to actively use the proxy. Transparent proxying means forcing all web traffic through the proxy without the cooperation (or knowledge) of the clients. Once all browser connections pass through the proxy, outgoing connections to external hosts can be restricted to the proxy, and direct connections from local clients can be blocked.

The OpenBSD packet filter (pf) can be used to redirect connections based on various criteria, including source and destination addresses and ports. For instance, one can redirect all TCP connections with destination port 80 (HTTP) that arrive through an interface connected to local workstations to a squid proxy running on a different address and port.
Unix+clones Streaming music with SlimServer
Post date: June 15, 2005, 12:06 Category: Network Views: 72
Tutorial quote: Converting your CD collection into MP3 or another digital file format gives you the ability to enjoy the music on your computer and stream it all over the house and the Internet. To do the latter, however, you have to install and configure a streaming server on your computer. That might sound like a daunting task, but there is a streaming server application that makes the whole process pretty painless. SlimServer from Slim Devices is a cross-platform streaming server that runs on Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X and supports a wide range of formats, including AAC, AIFF, FLAC, Ogg Vorbis, MP3, WAV, and WMA. Although it was developed to stream music files to Slim Devices' Squeezebox2 hardware player, it works perfectly with any software MP3 player capable of working with network streams.
SuSe User-Mode Linux
Post date: December 8, 2005, 08:12 Category: Software Views: 137
Tutorial quote: One of the largest efforts involved with software engineering is testing the software to make sure that it works as designed. Testing can require several different types of system configurations and could require multiple instances of Linux. One way to create this type of environment is to use a virtual machine.

User-Mode Linux (UML) is a fully functional Linux kernel. It runs its own scheduler and virtual memory (VM) system, relying on the host kernel for hardware support. It includes virtual block, network, and serial devices to provide an environment that is almost as full-featured as a hardware-based machine. UML cannot destroy the host machine. Furthermore, the UML block devices, also called disks, can be files on the native Linux file system, so you cannot affect the native block devices. This is very useful when you're testing and debugging block operations.
Fedora+Core Tripwire on your Fedora Box
Post date: April 15, 2005, 20:04 Category: Security Views: 225
Tutorial quote: Tripwire is an Intrusion Detection System. This can be used to alert users whenever their system is compromised. Tripwire detects and reports changes in system files. It will alert you through email whenever a change is detected. If the change is due to normal system activity, you can instruct Tripwire not to report the change to that file in future. If the change is not due to normal system activity, then it is a clear indication that something is wrong and you need to act immediately and fix the issue. Thus tripwire comes very handy to maintain the integrity of the system.

There is lot of information on the web about Tripwire. Some people might argue that AIDE (Advanced Intrusion Detection Environment) is better than tripwire and so on. This comparison is beyond the scope of this article. This is an introductory article for novice users who are interested in installing Tripwire on their Fedora Box. Advanced users can refer to the web for relevant information or they can contact appropriate mailing lists like fedora users mailing list.
Linux Creating Really Teensy ELF Executables for Linux
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 34
Tutorial quote: If you're a programmer who's become fed up with software bloat, then may you find herein the perfect antidote.

This document explores methods for squeezing excess bytes out of simple programs. (Of course, the more practical purpose of this document is to describe a few of the inner workings of the ELF file format and the Linux operating system. But hopefully you can also learn something about how to make really teensy ELF executables in the process.)

Please note that the information and examples given here are, for the most part, specific to ELF executables on a Linux platform running under an Intel-386 architecture. I imagine that a good bit of the information is applicable to other ELF-based Unices, but my experiences with such are too limited for me to say with certainty.

The assembly code that appears in this document is written for use with Nasm. (Besides being more appropriate for our needs, Nasm's syntax beats the hell out of AT&T syntax for anyone who learned x86 assembly language before learning to use Gas.) Nasm is freely available and extremely portable; see http://nasm.sourceforge.net/.

Please also note that if you aren't a little bit familiar with assembly code, you may find parts of this document sort of hard to follow.