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Search results for Convert any video file to DVD with open source tools

Linux Building a Linux video jukebox for an anime convention
Post date: November 25, 2005, 16:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 125
Tutorial quote: I wrote this little whitepaper a while back for Amy Zunk to document the function of the VideoKeg/VideoJukebox boxes. Documented here for posterity. The primary goal of the video keg was to build a reliable video box that was easy to transport with enough space to store 3 days worth of Anime fan-subs.

The secondary goal of the video keg was to make a home PVR system for video playback and time-shifting, along with a video arcade and perhaps a web browser. The tertiary goal of the video keg was to find an affordable hardware platform so that we could buy 4 of them immmediately to service the primary goal's need for 4 separate video rooms.

For a PVR, the machine neeed to be small, quiet, low-heat, and still fast enough to run the software video player and arcade games. For portability, we decided to go with a smaller mini-ITX style cube box.
Unix+clones Introduction to Python
Post date: April 17, 2005, 05:04 Category: Programming Views: 53
Tutorial quote: Ok, first part is going to be fairly boring, but put up with it. Im just going to go through a few reasons why you should choose Python as a language to learn. First off it free!, there is no cost involved in gettin Python, although there is a license, but this is just a standard license that goes with all free and open source software. Python is an open source language, as is the interpreter (Python is written in C).
Unix+clones DVD9 > DVD5 guide
Post date: May 7, 2005, 13:05 Category: Software Views: 138
Tutorial quote: This guide lets you rip a DVD (all titles or just the main movie) and burn it on a DVD-R (4.7) that will play on your standalone player.
Linux Add Windows media support to your Linux box
Post date: December 31, 2005, 10:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 91
Tutorial quote: Having trouble getting .WMV, .WMA, and .ASF files - the Windows-based media formats - to open on your Linux box? Being forced to dual-boot or switch workstations just to listen to or watch audio and video clips is usually more effort than it's worth. But fortunately, if you are using Xine and one of its frontends like Totem, you can add support for these file formats within Linux.
Ubuntu Essential house keeping in Ubuntu
Post date: December 8, 2005, 06:12 Category: System Views: 184
Tutorial quote: I started using Ubuntu Breezy ver 5.10 a month back on my machine. Prior to that I was exclusively into Fedora. What drew me to Ubuntu was the huge number of packages in its repositories including softwares which I find useful on a day-to-day basis like Tomboy which I had to compile from source in Fedora. But the Ubuntu CD comes with the base packages which support only open file formats. So if you want support for proprietary file formats like mp3 and quicktime support as well as install softwares not included on the CD, then you have to do some work.

I call it essential housekeeping because it is not exactly a problem, but only a matter of finding out how to get the necessary support. Here I share my experiences in putting the Ubuntu house in order on my machine.
Unix+clones Downloading without a Browser
Post date: November 29, 2005, 14:11 Category: Software Views: 55
Tutorial quote: Ever had to download a file so huge over a link so slow that you'd need to keep the web browser open for hours or days? What if you had 40 files linked from a single web page, all of which you needed -- will you tediously click on each one? What if the browser crashes before it can finish? GNU/Linux comes equipped with a handy set of tools for downloading in the background, independent of the browser. This allows you to log out, resume interrupted downloads, and even schedule them to occur during off-peak Net usage hours.
Linux WiFi PDA Meets Linux--Part 3
Post date: May 28, 2005, 18:05 Category: Software Views: 74
Tutorial quote: Did you know that your new WiFi-equipped iPAQ can be used as a VoIP communicator? How about your Linux notebook? The program that makes it possible is called Skype and it lets you call other Skype users over the Internet for free. You can also call regular phone numbers for very competitive per-minute rates. As it turns out, Skype is available for both platforms and Windows, too. Although it's not an Open Source solution, it is freely available and fits nicely into our WiFi-PDA-meets-Linux bag of tools.

Join me now to discover how you can use the program on the iPAQ and a Linux notebook.
Debian Building A Virtual Server (VPS) With Debian 3.1 (Sarge) And OpenVZ
Post date: March 20, 2006, 15:03 Category: System Views: 36
Tutorial quote: In this HowTo I will describe the steps to be taken to prepare a server for OpenVZ virtual machines on Debian 3.1 (Sarge) 32Bit Linux. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project. OpenVZ is the open-source branch of Virtuozzo, a commercial virtualization solution used by many providers that offer virtual servers. The OpenVZ kernal patch is licensed under the GPL license, and the user-level tools are under the QPL license.
Unix+clones How-To: Stream almost anything using VLC
Post date: November 29, 2005, 15:11 Category: Software Views: 77
Tutorial quote: The VLC media player is an amazing piece of software. In its most basic form it is a lightweight media player that can play almost any audio or video format you throw at it. VLC is also multiplatform in the most extreme sense of the word; it can run on Windows, OSX, Linux and PocketPC / WinCE handhelds along with other systems. VLC works great as a streaming server and video transcoder too.
Linux Benchmarking Filesystems
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 95
Tutorial quote: I recently purchased a Western Digital 250GB/8M/7200RPM drive and wondered which journaling file system I should use. I currently use ext2 on my other, smaller hard drives. Upon reboot or unclean shutdown, e2fsck takes a while on drives only 40 and 60 gigabytes. Therefore I knew using a journaling file system would be my best bet. The question is: which is the best? In order to determine this I used common operations that Linux users may perform on a regular basis instead of using benchmark tools such as Bonnie or Iozone. I wanted a "real life" benchmark analysis. A quick analogy: Just because the Ethernet-Over-Power-Lines may advertise 10mbps (1.25MB/s), in real world tests, peak speed is only 5mbps (625KB/s). This is why I chose to run my own tests versus using hard drive benchmarking tools.