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Unix+clones How to Set Up a Jabber Server
Post date: April 12, 2005, 12:04 Category: Software Views: 37
Tutorial quote: Unless you have been living under a rock for the past few years, you must have heard about instant messaging and how it has changed the world of communications over the Internet. According to http://www.webopedia.com, Instant Messaging (IM) is a service that alerts users when their friends or colleagues are on line and allows them to communicate in real time through private online chat areas. Two of the most popular IM services are AOL Instant Messenger (AIM) and MSN Messenger. Unfortunately, most of the publicly available servers use proprietary protocols that only allow you to communicate with users on the same system. These systems are not compatible with each other and can't be accessed from other clients.

Jabber is an open source implementation of the IM server that aims to change this. It uses streaming XML protocols that are free, open, and public. These protocols have been formalized by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) as the approved instant messaging and presence technology under the name of XMPP. The first Jabber technologies were developed in 1998 by Jeremie Miller and is now used on thousands of servers world-wide to enable millions of users to communicate with each other.

The biggest advantage of the Jabber server when compared with commercial IM servers is that, since it is open source, anyone can run a Jabber server and it can be restricted to a specific community like a company work force or a group of friends. In this article, I will document the steps I took to set up a Jabber server and how I managed to overcome the difficulties I faced. Hopefully this will make it easier for you to set up your own Jabber server.
Debian Installing and Configuring Exim4
Post date: February 25, 2006, 07:02 Category: Network Views: 88
Tutorial quote: Installion of Exim4 from the latest Debian GNU/Linux packages is easy. The installation is now based around debconf. If you are upgrading from a simple Exim3 configuration, you can use exim_convert4r4 to convert your configuration file to the new format. If you used the previous version of this guide, which covered Exim3, the conversion should succeed without incident. I intend to discuss configuration via debconf, including setting up local delivery to Maildir format, handling local domain email, and configuring smarthosting for outbound email.
Linux Xen Virtualization and Linux Clustering, Part 2
Post date: January 21, 2006, 01:01 Category: System Views: 59
Tutorial quote: We ended last time after configuring our first unprivileged Xen domain. In this article, we complete our cluster and then test it using an open-source parallel ray tracer. The first thing we need to do is create additional slave nodes to be used with the cluster. So, let's get down to business.
Unix+clones Optimizing DSPAM + MySQL 4.1
Post date: April 2, 2006, 18:04 Category: Optimizing Views: 16
Tutorial quote: DSPAM is a scalable and open-source content-based spam filter designed for multi-user enterprise systems. It's great at filtering out spam but on busy mailservers the pruning of the MySQL databases takes way too long time ...
Mepis Mepis + apt = Working On Easy Street
Post date: April 13, 2005, 15:04 Category: System Views: 103
Tutorial quote: My reasoning for combining the traditional Debian apt command with Mepis was speed and efficiency. Also, in the fine tradition of open source, I could choose to use the command line instead of the Kpackage or Mepis System Center package management screen. This is a good way to learn about Debian systems that builds confidence for new users right off the bat.

Let's see how apt works with Mepis.
Linux Controlling your locale with environment variables
Post date: May 2, 2006, 08:05 Category: System Views: 10
Tutorial quote: People all over the world use Linux in dozens of languages. Since Linux's source code is free and open, speakers of minority languages can add support for their languages themselves, even though a large corporation might not consider them a worthwhile market. If you use more than one language, or a language other than English, you should know about Linux's use of locales to support different languages. Indeed, understanding locales can be useful even if you only use English.
Unix+clones Emulating an OS with qemu
Post date: May 22, 2005, 04:05 Category: Emulation Views: 86
Tutorial quote: When you want to emulate a PC with a complete operating system on your computer, the most heard answer would be VMWare. Sure, for Linux, there is wine, but that package is targeted to handle only window$ and not all programs are supported. No, I'm talking about simulating a complete OS on a virtual PC with virtual hardware.

Although VMware does an almost perfect job at it, it isn't free software. Time to see what the Open Source community has to offer. That's when I stumbled upon qemu. Let's have a look at the possibilities.
Unix+clones The lost art of named pipes
Post date: April 15, 2005, 17:04 Category: System Views: 58
Tutorial quote: A "named pipe" -- also known as a FIFO (First In, First Out) or just fifo -- is an inter-process communication mechanism that makes use of the filesystem to allow two processes to communicate with each other. In particular, it allows one of these to open one end of the pipe as a reader, and the other to open it as a writer. Let's take a look at the FIFO and how you can use it.
Mepis Upgrading to Linux from Windows 98
Post date: April 18, 2005, 03:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 134
Tutorial quote: In this tutorial-style article, Michael C. Barnes outlines a strategy to avoid costly upgrades from Windows 98 to Windows XP -- in terms of both hardware and software -- by upgrading to Linux, instead. Barnes reviews the typical requirements of computers used for relatively generic purposes, and shows how to give a new lease on life to aging laptops and PCs by replacing obsolete OSes such as Windows 98 with a combination of Linux, free open source applications, and inexpensive commercial software.
Linux How to play DVDs on any x86 GNU/Linux distro
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 76
Tutorial quote: My folks recently bought and sent me two DVDs, but the only DVD player I have is in my Linux-based computer. Using the free software application MPlayer, I was able to watch my videos. I'll walk you through the easy steps required.