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Unix+clones Comparing MySQL performance
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 57
Tutorial quote: With the introduction of the 2.6 Linux kernel, FreeBSD-5-STABLE, Solaris 10, and now NetBSD 2.0, you might be wondering which of them offers superior database performance. In my previous article, I discussed the tools I chose to test these venerable operating systems and the methodology by which they were tested. The result is this MySQL performance comparison between OpenBSD 3.6; NetBSD 2.0; FreeBSD 5.3 and 4.10; Solaris Express (build 69); and Linux 2.4 and 2.6 (Gentoo-based). Read on for the results.
Gentoo Creating a WebDAV server with apache2
Post date: May 26, 2005, 12:05 Category: Network Views: 289
Tutorial quote: I needed a way to share information (both read and write) as easy as possible with friends in a quite restricted environment (firewall). In many cases, WebDAV which uses standard HTTP port 80 for comunication is a good solution for a file server application.
Debian Configuring Dynamic DNS & DHCP on Debian Stable
Post date: February 2, 2006, 20:02 Category: Network Views: 55
Tutorial quote: For the average home computer user there is no need to install a complex package such as the Internet Software Consortium's BIND DNS or DHCP server, since there are far simpler lower resource tools to use, for example dnsmasq. For those who you wish to learn how to use ISC's BIND and DHCP, for example as a learning exercise, this is how I got it all to work in Debian Sarge, the current stable version of Debian GNU/Linux.

This short article was prompted by my question on the Debian-Administration forum site, where I was able to get some answers to the issues I faced and I did promise to post a solution if I got one.
Solaris Configuring Apache
Post date: April 13, 2005, 01:04 Category: Network Views: 81
Tutorial quote: Apache can respond to browser requests from machines on your local network (i.e. an "Intranet" Web server) or from the Internet. The installation of the Solaris OS installed and set up most of the necessary Apache files. As a result, if you want to use your system as a Web server you only need to modify one file.
Fedora+Core Enhancing Apache with mod_security
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Security Views: 93
Tutorial quote: Like probably quite a few of you, I run and admin some websites (some for fun, some for work), and as many of you surely do, some of these websites are mounted on a CMS. CMS are not the 8th wonder of the world, however some of them are pretty good, and they save you a lot of time by automating tons of tasks... however, as in every piece of code there exists, all of them are insecure and buggy (in fact, every piece of software is insecure and buggy to a degree)

So, searching for tools and ways to prevent people from breaking into my site without authorization, I began my search and found a great piece of software: mod_security for Apache.
Solaris Configuring Sendmail
Post date: April 12, 2005, 23:04 Category: Network Views: 89
Tutorial quote: Sendmail has the reputation of having the most hideous configuration file in the history of mankind. It's extremely long and incredibly cryptic. However, it is this very complexity that has made it the most popular MTA (Mail Transport Agent) on the Internet. Its' flexibility allows sendmail to handle the most demanding, disjointed mail routing and serving configurations you can dream up.
Linux Scheduling Backup Jobs using at and crontab
Post date: April 21, 2006, 12:04 Category: Installing Views: 13
Tutorial quote: You can schedule a command or a script using two tools

crontab : Schedules tasks once or repeatedly.

You can use the crontab command to run commands at regular times. For example, you could schedule a backup of your files every Friday. Commands can be scheduled to the minute.

at : Schedules tasks once.

You can use the at command to schedule a command or script to run a single time. The command includes several utilities
Debian Create an Encrypted Loopback Device
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Security Views: 89
Tutorial quote: A loopback device is a very special device that allows you to mount a normal file as it was a physical device. loopbacks can be encrypted: this becomes very useful sometimes.

Consider, as na example, that you need to encrypt a few files, nothing big, let's say 100 MB or so. Encrypting an entire partition could be too much. Then a cryptoloop could be the right solution to your problem.
Linux Linux tools for study and analysis of biological information
Post date: May 24, 2005, 14:05 Category: Software Views: 63
Tutorial quote: This article wants to show some of the advantages of Perl programming on Unix, for extraction of the biological information of the DNA, RNA and proteine sequences Databases. They can be used in comparative processes or analysis. The Human Genome project and the DNA clonation techniques have accelerated the scientific progress in this area. Daily generated information in this field outgrows often the capability of processing this information from an evolutive viewpoint.

The fast proliferation of the biological information on different genomes (dowry of genes of an organism) is driving bioinformatics as one fundamental discipline for the handling and analysis of these data.
Unix+clones CLI Magic: OpenSSH + Bash
Post date: January 25, 2006, 15:01 Category: Network Views: 30
Tutorial quote: As a system administrator, I have used OpenSSH's piping abilities more times than I can remember. The typical ssh call gets me access to systems for administration with a proven identity, but ssh is capable of so much more. In combination with bash's subshell invocation, OpenSSH can distribute the heavy work, reduce trace interference on a system under test, and make other "impossible" tasks possible. I've even used it to make Microsoft Windows remote administration easier.

In the examples below, I have tried to avoid GNU-specific idioms for tools which have non-GNU counterparts. This practice improves portability of shell scripts in heterogeneous environments.