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Debian dmcrypt
Post date: January 25, 2006, 17:01 Category: Security Views: 85
Tutorial quote: Device-mapper is a new infrastructure in the Linux 2.6 kernel that provides a generic way to create virtual layers of block devices that can do different things on top of real block devices like striping, concatenation, mirroring, snapshotting, etc... The device-mapper is used by the LVM2 and EVMS 2.x tools. dm-crypt is such a device-mapper target that provides transparent encryption of block devices using the new Linux 2.6 cryptoapi. Writes to this device will be encrypted and reads decrypted. You can mount your filesystem on it as usual. But without the key you can't access your data. It does basically the same as cryptoloop only that it's a much cleaner code and better suits the need of a block device and has a more flexible configuration interface. The on-disk format is also compatible.
SGI Installing IRIX 6.5 Across a Network
Post date: May 21, 2005, 06:05 Category: Installing Views: 118
Tutorial quote: Installing across a network may be desirable for a number of reasons, usually speed, convenience (disks/CDROM attached to remote system) or necessity. I've done network installs on O2s, Octanes and Indys; in each case, a remote disk file system contained local copies of all the relevant 6.5 media.
Debian Firebird database Configuration
Post date: May 5, 2006, 13:05 Category: Installing Views: 4
Tutorial quote: Firebird is a relational database offering many ANSI SQL-99 features that runs on Linux, Windows, and a variety of Unix platforms. Firebird offers excellent concurrency, high performance, and powerful language support for stored procedures and triggers. It has been used in production systems, under a variety of names since 1981.

Firebird is a commercially independent project of C and C++ programmers, technical advisors and supporters developing and enhancing a multi-platform relational database management system based on the source code released by Inprise Corp (now known as Borland Software Corp) under the InterBase Public License v.1.0 on 25 July, 2000.
Debian Rolling your own Debian packages (part 1)
Post date: January 21, 2006, 01:01 Category: Software Views: 33
Tutorial quote: This two-part article explains how to make a Debian package of simple piece of software, presumably something you have written yourself. Although building a new package is more complex than rebuilding one or having one generated, the idea is that it is actually surprisingly simple to create basic Debian packages. In fact, if you can make software install into a temporary installation tree, you're already 90% done! This text provides a quick alternative to the more comprehensive Debian New Maintainers' Guide. Only knowledge of Makefiles and the basic Debian package tools is assumed.

The first part of this article will continue with some preliminary information about Debian packages. In the second part we walk through a concrete packaging example.
Gentoo Ripping cds using FLAC
Post date: June 22, 2005, 09:06 Category: Multimedia Views: 151
Tutorial quote: I'm a fan of sound quality, and since I have some disc space free, I decided to rip some CDs to the free lossless audio codec (FLAC) instead of ogg vorbis which I was using before. The compression rate is for now about 50%, depending on the content of the audio file. Also I found that FLAC encodes VERY fast (~60-140x on my Athlon XP 2400+).
FreeBSD Setting up Linux compatibility on FreeBSD 6
Post date: April 3, 2006, 02:04 Category: System Views: 21
Tutorial quote: As a FreeBSD desktop user I occasionally feel left out when it comes to the availability of applications, particularly desktop applications or binary-only browser plugins produced by commercial closed source vendors. Sometimes a good alternative lurks in the vast FreeBSD ports collection, but not always. The version available may lag a couple of revisions behind what I need, or the port might exclude my particular architecture. Fortunately, FreeBSD can run binaries and shared libraries that have been compiled for Linux and other Unix ABIs (such as SVR4 and SCO).

In this article I will cover the steps necessary to enable and configure Linux binary compatibility on FreeBSD 6. I'll also share a couple of my own experiences with getting some well-known desktop Linux applications to run on FreeBSD 6.
Debian Filesystems (ext3, reiser, xfs, jfs) comparison on Debian Etch
Post date: April 23, 2006, 04:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 16
Tutorial quote: There are a lot of Linux filesystems comparisons available but most of them are anecdotal, based on artificial tasks or completed under older kernels. This benchmark essay is based on 11 real-world tasks appropriate for a file server with older generation hardware (Pentium II/III, EIDE hard-drive).
Gentoo Fbsplash on gentoo
Post date: April 12, 2005, 01:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 177
Tutorial quote: Gensplash is a project started by Spock whose aim is to create a set of tools which could enrich the Gentoo boot process by displaying messages, animations, progress bars, etc. An explanation of the various things named *splash (bootsplash, gensplash, fbsplash, and splashutils) and how they relate to each other, can be found at Spock's Gensplash site.

Fbsplash is part of the gensplash project. According to fbsplash's documentation, "the framebuffer splash is a kernel feature that allows displaying a background picture on selected consoles and switching the first console to the so-called silent mode, while booting/rebooting/shutting down the system." The fbsplash device is accessed through the /dev/fbsplash device node. For fbsplash to work, a frame buffer device is required.
Unix+clones Version control for non-programmers with Subversion
Post date: June 9, 2005, 00:06 Category: Software Views: 89
Tutorial quote: Imagine a utility that lets you make an annotated backup of any of your project files with the click of a mouse or a single command. It would let you review the history of your backups and recover any version you wished. And it would integrate with your file browser and would keep track of files that have changed since your last backup. The utility exists -- Subversion, and its companion program TortoiseSVN, can help you safely manage your files as you work with them.
Unix+clones Remote backup using ssh, tar and cron
Post date: April 12, 2005, 21:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 51
Tutorial quote: Are you looking for a solution to backup your data to a remote location? While a solid backup solution such as Arkeia or TSM from IBM are nice from an enterprise point of view, simpler solutions are available from a home user's perspective. I will walk you through on you how you can backup your data to a remote server, using the default tools available on all linux systems. In a nutshell, we will use ssh capabilities to allow a cron job to transfer a tarball from you local machine to a remote machine.

For the purpose of this tutorial, the local machine will be called “localmachine” (running slackware) and the remote server will be called “remoteserver” (slackware as well). The user will be joe (me). You will have to substitute those 3 with your own machines names and user.