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Search results for Correct Multimedia Support in SUSE Linux 9.2

SuSe Correct Multimedia Support in SUSE Linux 9.2
Post date: April 12, 2005, 21:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 109
Tutorial quote: SUSE Linux is one of the better desktop Linux distributions on the market today, providing a functional and aesthetically pleasing environment for the new Linux user as well as seasoned veterans. On thing that puzzles many users is the lack of proper multimedia support in SUSE. The developers have basically crippled it from playing virtually all types of multimedia content that's common on the Internet today. This can be a frustrating dilema for new users, so I have written a short HOWTO to help you get everything in order on your new desktop.

It should be noted that you don't necessarily need to install apt to fix the multimedia problem on SUSE, but it's probably the most beneficial way to get it done. You can easily remove the offending packages and install new ones not provided by SUSE, but by using apt, you'll get the benefit of having a much larger package base available to you... something that SUSE has suffered from for a very long time. With or without apt, let's get things going with this HOWTO.
OpenSUSE Hacking OpenSUSE
Post date: December 3, 2005, 12:12 Category: System Views: 133
Tutorial quote: There's more to SUSE Linux than simply installing it and going to work. To get the most from the operating system, you'll probably want to do some post-install fine tuning. This article by Jem Matzan explains how to: add download sources to YaST; install the Mozilla Thunderbird email client; add support for Java, Flash, Acrobat, Windows Media, MP3s, and RealMedia; play DVDs -- and more. It serves as a useful supplement to Steven J. Rosen's excellent how-to, "Installing SUSE Linux 10 on a Laptop," recently published here on DesktopLinux.com. Enjoy . . . !
Yellow+Dog Installing Linux on the Mac mini
Post date: May 11, 2005, 08:05 Category: Installing Views: 112
Tutorial quote: The Mac mini is an ideal low-cost, high-performance PowerPC development platform for numerous applications. Learn how to install and configure Linux on the mini. Future articles will add the software required to make it into a stand-alone multimedia appliance.

This short series of articles shows you how to take a conveniently inexpensive, high-end PowerPC® platform (specifically, an Apple Mac mini) and build it into a home multimedia appliance using Linux™. At the end of the series, you'll have a stand-alone device that can play slide shows of images, audio, and movies, and that is controlled and administered from another machine using a standard Web browser.

The PowerPC platform is very well-suited to this type of multimedia application, and the G4 with AltiVec used in the Mac mini is an exceptionally powerful and flexible choice. This first article introduces you to the hardware's capabilities and walks you through installing and configuring Yellow Dog Linux so you can delve into some application code in the next article.
Fedora+Core Mozilla Firebird Plugins
Post date: April 16, 2005, 09:04 Category: Software Views: 82
Tutorial quote: In this tutorial, I will be showing you how to add:
- Browser pdf viewing support
- Java plugin support
- Flash support
SuSe Xgl on SUSE 10.1 for Gnome and KDE with NVidia Graphics Cards
Post date: May 12, 2006, 09:05 Category: Desktop Views: 6
Tutorial quote: Perhaps the most interesting eye-candy introduced to a mainstream Linux distribution is that of the Xgl 3D desktop environment. Naturally, when seen, it fosters the thought, "How can I do that on my own desktop?" I'll be honest with you, it's not quite as point-and-click as some of the other desktop niceties that we've discussed in the past, such as gdesklets or the gkrellm monitors. That in mind, if you're interested in getting Xgl installed and running on your desktop, you've found the right place. We'll take it a bit at a time and make sure we get you set up. First of all, I need to make sure that you are using this tutorial for a machine running either SUSE Linux 10.1 or SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10, and that you have an NVidia video card. With that, let's get going.
SuSe Setting up yum on SUSE LINUX 10.0
Post date: October 16, 2005, 12:10 Category: System Views: 218
Tutorial quote: Why should I use yum and not yast? Well, yast is nice, but has some disadvantages: It can#t check for gpg keys, you have to trust the mirrors you add. And, speaking about mirrors, yast has no real mirror management for one source. Especially in these times the most and best known SUSE mirrors are very slow or just closed down, so you have to add other sources in yast. But yast needs your clicks when a mirror is not reachable, and if you enter several sources just as mirrors, it checks every single source - that takes quite a long time!
A last reason (which is not important know because SUSE LINUX has a ugly workaround) is that yast is not able to handle packages for different architectures - it can only install packages for one architecture.
SuSe Working with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9
Post date: June 22, 2005, 05:06 Category: System Views: 130
Tutorial quote: Working with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) requires an understanding of the login process, including local account files, system accounts, and managing identities.

Using a console shell or the graphical environment are two possible methods of working on a SLES machine.

Finding your way around a SLES installation requires an in-depth knowledge of the filesystem layout. Essential filesystem components are documented and explained in this chapter. Basic filesystem permissions are also described.
RedHat Taking advantage of SELinux in Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Post date: April 15, 2005, 17:04 Category: Security Views: 130
Tutorial quote: The release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 debuts the first commercially supported inclusion of Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux). An installation of Red Hat's latest enterprise operating system has SELinux installed and enabled by default. In the past SELinux has been criticized for a lack of commercial support, many big sites were unable to use it due to the lack of support (Fedora Core 3 doesn't have the support that they require). Now in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, SELinux is a supported part of the OS, and such objections to the use of SELinux have gone away. SELinux is now widely regarded as being suitable for the largest sites.
Linux Add Windows media support to your Linux box
Post date: December 31, 2005, 10:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 91
Tutorial quote: Having trouble getting .WMV, .WMA, and .ASF files - the Windows-based media formats - to open on your Linux box? Being forced to dual-boot or switch workstations just to listen to or watch audio and video clips is usually more effort than it's worth. But fortunately, if you are using Xine and one of its frontends like Totem, you can add support for these file formats within Linux.
Ubuntu Essential house keeping in Ubuntu
Post date: December 8, 2005, 06:12 Category: System Views: 184
Tutorial quote: I started using Ubuntu Breezy ver 5.10 a month back on my machine. Prior to that I was exclusively into Fedora. What drew me to Ubuntu was the huge number of packages in its repositories including softwares which I find useful on a day-to-day basis like Tomboy which I had to compile from source in Fedora. But the Ubuntu CD comes with the base packages which support only open file formats. So if you want support for proprietary file formats like mp3 and quicktime support as well as install softwares not included on the CD, then you have to do some work.

I call it essential housekeeping because it is not exactly a problem, but only a matter of finding out how to get the necessary support. Here I share my experiences in putting the Ubuntu house in order on my machine.