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Search results for Creating desktop profiles with Sabayon

RedHat Creating desktop profiles with Sabayon
Post date: July 18, 2005, 18:07 Category: Desktop Views: 101
Tutorial quote: Instead of creating a new desktop setup every single time a new user comes along, it would be much easier to create some templates. If only there were an easy way to make and manage these templates.

Fortunately, we are not the first to ponder this issue. The creators of Sabayon decided to tackle the lack of a good desktop setting management tool. With Sabayon, they created an application that handles these problems and more.
Debian Manipulating the windows upon your desktop
Post date: January 19, 2006, 08:01 Category: Desktop Views: 79
Tutorial quote: If you're like me you'll most likely use a wide variety of desktop applications, and spend a lot of time setting up your desktop first thing in the afternoon when you login. Minimising some applications, setting others up to be visible upon all virtual desktops, etc. Even if you have a basic window manager you can automate this activity using Devil's Pie.

Devil's Pie is a simple utility, inspired by the Sawfish's matched windows option, which allows you to conduct actions upon desktop windows. Using it is a simple matter of creating a configuration file and starting the program when you login.
Linux Configure Multiple Network Profiles on Linux
Post date: April 12, 2005, 22:04 Category: Network Views: 30
Tutorial quote: Mobile Linux users face some interesting (OK, vexing) challenges when they want to plug into different networks. Any Linux system will easily support all manner of networking profiles--dialup, ISDN, Ethernet, wireless--the tricky bit is configuration. Manually re-configuring a PC for every connection is low on most users' lists of "fun things to do." You can be an ace scripting guru and fiddle up something yourself, or you can find a nice ready-made utility to do the work for you. Unfortunately, I have not found a universal utility to do this. However, there are a lot of utilities specific to various distributions, and an assortment of other utilities.
SuSe Xgl on SUSE 10.1 for Gnome and KDE with NVidia Graphics Cards
Post date: May 12, 2006, 09:05 Category: Desktop Views: 6
Tutorial quote: Perhaps the most interesting eye-candy introduced to a mainstream Linux distribution is that of the Xgl 3D desktop environment. Naturally, when seen, it fosters the thought, "How can I do that on my own desktop?" I'll be honest with you, it's not quite as point-and-click as some of the other desktop niceties that we've discussed in the past, such as gdesklets or the gkrellm monitors. That in mind, if you're interested in getting Xgl installed and running on your desktop, you've found the right place. We'll take it a bit at a time and make sure we get you set up. First of all, I need to make sure that you are using this tutorial for a machine running either SUSE Linux 10.1 or SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10, and that you have an NVidia video card. With that, let's get going.
Debian Network profiles for a laptop
Post date: December 22, 2005, 19:12 Category: Network Views: 50
Tutorial quote: This article explains how to configure networking in a very pleasant way, so that it works automatically wherever you go. It is adaptable to lots of uses, and may be usefull even if you don't use Wifi but connect to multiple networks.
Linux Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part II
Post date: May 24, 2005, 14:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 135
Tutorial quote: As we discussed in last week's article, for most of its existence, people have distributed Linux as a workstation or a server rather than as a desktop. The default workstation that evolved has existed mostly for use by developers. So, when you install a Linux distribution with a graphical interface, it generally looks like what a developer might want. In addition, it performs similar to how many UNIX workstations work, which can seem slow.

In this article, we continue to look at the Linux desktop in a different light. Here, we think of it as a computer system with a fast interface that we can optimize for the knowledge worker and consumer.
Linux Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part III
Post date: May 31, 2005, 10:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 144
Tutorial quote: For desktop and laptop users who want a fast-booting operating system, getting rid of services you do not need can appear to improve performance. Obviously, if you are new to Linux, though, you probably do not know which processes you can get rid of safely nor how to stop them and keep them from restarting at boot time.
PC-BSD Creating PC-BSD Packages (.pbi's)
Post date: August 31, 2005, 22:08 Category: Software Views: 106
Tutorial quote: I've found a neat, clean and fast way of creating PBI's that works 100%. and im writing this HOW-TO to explain it.
Unix+clones OpenOffice 2.0: Creating database forms
Post date: December 13, 2005, 07:12 Category: Software Views: 64
Tutorial quote: ather than having a shallow affair with OpenOffice 2.0, we can use it to get a little more intimate with the data. We can even badger it into forming relations. Why force your database tables into a marriage with OpenOffice? Because, as with human relations, life -- and data -- are pretty meaningless without tight connections.

This tip on creating forms is part of a series I'm writing on OpenOffice.org 2.0 Base. So far, I've discussed making a plain database from scratch, creating tables, entering data using the table editor and a simple form and creating a view of a table or tables.

Let's start off with a description of what table relations are anyway, then discuss how to create a data entry form like this one, which has data from two related tables.
RedHat Getting back my GNOME desktop from the clutches of the GNOME configuration system
Post date: July 18, 2005, 18:07 Category: Desktop Views: 86
Tutorial quote: My problem: as a user I managed to lock myself out of my GNOME desktop though a careless setting of Preferences-> Resolution.

In determining my solution I learned some key lessons about the GNOME configuration system.