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Search results for Darcs - easy VCS alternative to CVS

Gentoo Darcs - easy VCS alternative to CVS
Post date: June 21, 2005, 19:06 Category: Network Views: 74
Tutorial quote: This is a brief introduction to Darcs - a distributed SCM system and a healthy alternative to CVS. It will show you an easy, more modern approach to VCS. The project I contribute to (formerly XWT, renamed to Vexi) has greatly benefitted from moving to Darcs from CVS because now we can make rapid progress without the fear of making bad commits to the server or the server being down. People can code and pull other's code at their own convenience.
Unix+clones Keeping Your Life in Subversion
Post date: October 2, 2005, 12:10 Category: Software Views: 118
Tutorial quote: I keep my life in a Subversion repository. For the past five years, I've checked every file I've created and worked on, every email I've sent or received, and every config file I've tweaked into revision control. Five years ago, when I started doing this using CVS, people thought I was nuts to use revision control in this way. Today it's still not a common practice, but thanks to my earlier article "CVS homedir" (Linux Journal, issue 101), I know I'm not alone. In this article I will describe how my new home directory setup is working now that I've switched from CVS to Subversion.

Subversion is a revision-control system. Like the earlier and much cruftier CVS, its purpose is to manage chunks of code, such as free software programs with multiple developers, or in-house software projects involving several employees. Unlike CVS, Subversion handles directories and file renaming reasonably, which is more than sufficient reason to switch to it if you're already using CVS. It also fixes most of CVS's other misfeatures. Subversion still has its warts, though, such as an inability to store symbolic links and some file permissions, and its need for twice as much disk space as you'd expect thanks to the copies of everything in those .svn directories. These problems can be quite annoying when you're keeping your whole home directory in svn. Why bother?
Debian Running scripts after a reboot for non-root users
Post date: April 4, 2006, 21:04 Category: System Views: 15
Tutorial quote: There is an alternative way of adding entries to your crontab file, using shortcuts. The shortcuts allow you to make entries that will match at particular times.
Unix+clones Version Control with Subversion (Online book)
Post date: April 27, 2005, 23:04 Category: Software Views: 52
Tutorial quote: This is the online home of Version Control with Subversion, a free book about Subversion, a new version control system designed to supplant CVS. As you may have guessed from the layout of this page, this book is published by O'Reilly Media.
Unix+clones DNS name serving through NSD
Post date: July 5, 2005, 02:07 Category: Network Views: 80
Tutorial quote: Given the sheer importance of name servers in providing Domain Name System (DNS) resolution -- a process used by every Web-facing application to translate domain names into IP addresses and vice versa -- not many people put much thought into the available software alternatives for pulling off this feat. One compelling application is NSD, an alternative to the widely deployed BIND name server.
Linux Gnu Queue: Linux Clustering Made Easy
Post date: December 22, 2005, 14:12 Category: System Views: 84
Tutorial quote: GNU Queue makes it easy to cluster Linux workstations. If you already know how to control jobs running on your local machine, you already know how to control remote jobs using GNU Queue. You don't even need special privileges to install and run GNU Queue on your cluster--anyone can do it. Once you've discovered how incredibly easy it is to cluster Linux environments with GNU Queue, you'll wonder why organizations continue to spend so much money on comparatively hard-to-cluster Windows NT environments.
Debian Rolling your own Debian packages (part 1)
Post date: January 21, 2006, 01:01 Category: Software Views: 33
Tutorial quote: This two-part article explains how to make a Debian package of simple piece of software, presumably something you have written yourself. Although building a new package is more complex than rebuilding one or having one generated, the idea is that it is actually surprisingly simple to create basic Debian packages. In fact, if you can make software install into a temporary installation tree, you're already 90% done! This text provides a quick alternative to the more comprehensive Debian New Maintainers' Guide. Only knowledge of Makefiles and the basic Debian package tools is assumed.

The first part of this article will continue with some preliminary information about Debian packages. In the second part we walk through a concrete packaging example.
Linux LCD displays easy to use and easy to build
Post date: May 24, 2005, 14:05 Category: Hardware Views: 113
Tutorial quote: This article presents now the "basic" model: LCD display and 2 buttons; simple and easy to build for everybody.

Lcdproc used to be at the very beginning a program to display some statistics (cpu load, uptime, time, ...) on an external LCD display. Over time it has however evolved into a much more generic solution. Today the lcdproc package contains LCDd, a generic server and LCD driver, plus many clients. One of those clients is still the actual executable called lcdproc which still shows server statistics however there are also others. This client server architecture has the big advantage that you do not need to write your client in a specific language. You just need to use the simple ascii protocol between client and server.
Debian Easy SugarCRM Configuration Steps
Post date: April 20, 2006, 15:04 Category: Installing Views: 12
Tutorial quote: SugarCRM includes a sales, marketing, and service suite of CRM applications. Sugar.Sales includes account and contact management, opportunity management, activity tracking, charting, reporting, and email integration with MS Outlook. SugarCRM is easy to install and supports custom user interface templates that are optimized for speed.
FreeBSD Setting up Linux compatibility on FreeBSD 6
Post date: April 3, 2006, 02:04 Category: System Views: 21
Tutorial quote: As a FreeBSD desktop user I occasionally feel left out when it comes to the availability of applications, particularly desktop applications or binary-only browser plugins produced by commercial closed source vendors. Sometimes a good alternative lurks in the vast FreeBSD ports collection, but not always. The version available may lag a couple of revisions behind what I need, or the port might exclude my particular architecture. Fortunately, FreeBSD can run binaries and shared libraries that have been compiled for Linux and other Unix ABIs (such as SVR4 and SCO).

In this article I will cover the steps necessary to enable and configure Linux binary compatibility on FreeBSD 6. I'll also share a couple of my own experiences with getting some well-known desktop Linux applications to run on FreeBSD 6.