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Debian Debian Sid gets Xen 3.0
Post date: May 12, 2006, 08:05 Category: Software Views: 2
Tutorial quote: Now that the Xen 3.0 packages have made it to Debians unstable distribution installation has become much more straightforward. Here we'll take a look at installing and getting started with it upon a generic unstable machine.
Debian Installing Xen 3.0 upon Debian Unstable, with a custom Kernel
Post date: December 29, 2005, 02:12 Category: System Views: 91
Tutorial quote: Recently we demonstrated the process of installing a binary release of Xen 3.0 on Sarge, since the packages on Debian Unstable are not yet available for Xen 3.0 we're now going to look at installing it via the packages provided by Ralph Passgang. This also includes building a custom Xen kernel from source.

The advantage to building the Xen kernel from source is that you can add, or remove, drivers - so the kernel is utterly customised for your system.
Debian The Perfect Xen 3.0 Setup For Debian
Post date: April 1, 2006, 00:04 Category: System Views: 11
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.1) on a Debian Sarge (3.1) system.

Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Linux Xen Virtualization and Linux Clustering, Part 1
Post date: January 21, 2006, 01:01 Category: System Views: 100
Tutorial quote: Have you heard about Xen virtualization and want to get some hands-on experience? Do you want to experiment with Linux clustering but only have a single computer to devote to the cause? If you answered yes to either of these questions, keep reading.

In this article, I briefly introduce the concepts of Xen virtualization and Linux clustering. From there, I show you how to set up multiple operating systems on a single computer using Xen and how to configure them for use with clustering. I should point out that a cluster implemented in this manner does not provide the computational power of multiple physical computers. It does, however, offer a way to prototype a cluster as well as provide a cost-effective development environment for cluster-based software. Even if you're not interested in clustering, this article gives you hands-on experience using Xen virtualization.
Debian Giving your Xen instances a working X setup
Post date: January 2, 2006, 23:01 Category: Software Views: 90
Tutorial quote: Xen, the virtualisation system, is a great tool for running fresh copies of an operating system. However it doesn't allow you to run X11 programs. Here we can fix that with the help of VNC.
Linux Xen Virtualization and Linux Clustering, Part 2
Post date: January 21, 2006, 01:01 Category: System Views: 58
Tutorial quote: We ended last time after configuring our first unprivileged Xen domain. In this article, we complete our cluster and then test it using an open-source parallel ray tracer. The first thing we need to do is create additional slave nodes to be used with the cluster. So, let's get down to business.
Debian Building A Virtual Server (VPS) With Debian 3.1 (Sarge) And OpenVZ
Post date: March 20, 2006, 15:03 Category: System Views: 35
Tutorial quote: In this HowTo I will describe the steps to be taken to prepare a server for OpenVZ virtual machines on Debian 3.1 (Sarge) 32Bit Linux. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project. OpenVZ is the open-source branch of Virtuozzo, a commercial virtualization solution used by many providers that offer virtual servers. The OpenVZ kernal patch is licensed under the GPL license, and the user-level tools are under the QPL license.
Unix+clones Xen Disk I/O benchmarking: NetBSD dom0 vs Linux dom0
Post date: April 21, 2005, 06:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 107
Tutorial quote: Xen is a relatively new technology to enable several virtual machines (domU) to run on one computer. The purpose of this article is to determine what operating system (NetBSD or Linux) should be selected as domain 0 (dom0) operating system to get the best performance when running several CPU and disk intensive virtual machines at the same time.
Debian Automating new Debian installations with preseeding
Post date: May 4, 2006, 22:05 Category: Installing Views: 8
Tutorial quote: Anyone doing Debian installations regularly might be interested in the preseed method of the Debian installer. This document describes how to use this technique.
Debian Rolling your own Debian packages (part 1)
Post date: January 21, 2006, 01:01 Category: Software Views: 32
Tutorial quote: This two-part article explains how to make a Debian package of simple piece of software, presumably something you have written yourself. Although building a new package is more complex than rebuilding one or having one generated, the idea is that it is actually surprisingly simple to create basic Debian packages. In fact, if you can make software install into a temporary installation tree, you're already 90% done! This text provides a quick alternative to the more comprehensive Debian New Maintainers' Guide. Only knowledge of Makefiles and the basic Debian package tools is assumed.

The first part of this article will continue with some preliminary information about Debian packages. In the second part we walk through a concrete packaging example.