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Unix+clones Downloading without a Browser
Post date: November 29, 2005, 14:11 Category: Software Views: 55
Tutorial quote: Ever had to download a file so huge over a link so slow that you'd need to keep the web browser open for hours or days? What if you had 40 files linked from a single web page, all of which you needed -- will you tediously click on each one? What if the browser crashes before it can finish? GNU/Linux comes equipped with a handy set of tools for downloading in the background, independent of the browser. This allows you to log out, resume interrupted downloads, and even schedule them to occur during off-peak Net usage hours.
Fedora+Core Mozilla Firebird Plugins
Post date: April 16, 2005, 09:04 Category: Software Views: 82
Tutorial quote: In this tutorial, I will be showing you how to add:
- Browser pdf viewing support
- Java plugin support
- Flash support
Linux Use Webmin for Linux Administration
Post date: April 12, 2005, 20:04 Category: Software Views: 39
Tutorial quote: Administering Linux and Unix-based servers does not need to be the scourge of your work day. With a handy tool called Webmin as part of your arsenal, you can regain complete control of your servers via the Web browser.
Solaris Configuring Apache
Post date: April 13, 2005, 01:04 Category: Network Views: 81
Tutorial quote: Apache can respond to browser requests from machines on your local network (i.e. an "Intranet" Web server) or from the Internet. The installation of the Solaris OS installed and set up most of the necessary Apache files. As a result, if you want to use your system as a Web server you only need to modify one file.
Linux Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part I
Post date: May 16, 2005, 19:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 76
Tutorial quote: If you have complained about the speed of OpenOffice.org or Firefox or about the amount of time Linux takes to boot up, this set of optimizations should change your perception. Linux can boot up quickly, the word processor can spring open and the browser can fly. So, let's make these adjustments so your computer can fly.
Unix+clones Version control for non-programmers with Subversion
Post date: June 9, 2005, 00:06 Category: Software Views: 89
Tutorial quote: Imagine a utility that lets you make an annotated backup of any of your project files with the click of a mouse or a single command. It would let you review the history of your backups and recover any version you wished. And it would integrate with your file browser and would keep track of files that have changed since your last backup. The utility exists -- Subversion, and its companion program TortoiseSVN, can help you safely manage your files as you work with them.
FreeBSD Setting up Linux compatibility on FreeBSD 6
Post date: April 3, 2006, 02:04 Category: System Views: 21
Tutorial quote: As a FreeBSD desktop user I occasionally feel left out when it comes to the availability of applications, particularly desktop applications or binary-only browser plugins produced by commercial closed source vendors. Sometimes a good alternative lurks in the vast FreeBSD ports collection, but not always. The version available may lag a couple of revisions behind what I need, or the port might exclude my particular architecture. Fortunately, FreeBSD can run binaries and shared libraries that have been compiled for Linux and other Unix ABIs (such as SVR4 and SCO).

In this article I will cover the steps necessary to enable and configure Linux binary compatibility on FreeBSD 6. I'll also share a couple of my own experiences with getting some well-known desktop Linux applications to run on FreeBSD 6.
Linux Building a Linux video jukebox for an anime convention
Post date: November 25, 2005, 16:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 125
Tutorial quote: I wrote this little whitepaper a while back for Amy Zunk to document the function of the VideoKeg/VideoJukebox boxes. Documented here for posterity. The primary goal of the video keg was to build a reliable video box that was easy to transport with enough space to store 3 days worth of Anime fan-subs.

The secondary goal of the video keg was to make a home PVR system for video playback and time-shifting, along with a video arcade and perhaps a web browser. The tertiary goal of the video keg was to find an affordable hardware platform so that we could buy 4 of them immmediately to service the primary goal's need for 4 separate video rooms.

For a PVR, the machine neeed to be small, quiet, low-heat, and still fast enough to run the software video player and arcade games. For portability, we decided to go with a smaller mini-ITX style cube box.
Unix+clones Making Web Browsing Easy For The Tiny Screen
Post date: August 9, 2005, 15:08 Category: Network Views: 73
Tutorial quote: An avalanche of content will soon appear in the palm of your hand.

Tiny screens are showing up everywhere in PDAs and cell phones. Many are equipped with some form of network device and a browser, so it's not hard to see what's coming down the pike.

Late model PDAs, like my HP iPAQ 3715 no longer suffer from insufficient computing power, lack of memory or having to rely on pricey external 802.11b cards. The little machine is quick to boot up and can handle many daily business functions.

Even though it runs a version of Internet Explorer, jumping onto an access point and browsing web pages is fast and useful.

In this edition, I'll share my observations on things you might consider when converting LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) applications or web pages, for use on the tiny screen. I'll approach the issues from an iPAQ user perspective and focus on convenience and making the user's life easy.
Yellow+Dog Installing Linux on the Mac mini
Post date: May 11, 2005, 08:05 Category: Installing Views: 112
Tutorial quote: The Mac mini is an ideal low-cost, high-performance PowerPC development platform for numerous applications. Learn how to install and configure Linux on the mini. Future articles will add the software required to make it into a stand-alone multimedia appliance.

This short series of articles shows you how to take a conveniently inexpensive, high-end PowerPC® platform (specifically, an Apple Mac mini) and build it into a home multimedia appliance using Linux™. At the end of the series, you'll have a stand-alone device that can play slide shows of images, audio, and movies, and that is controlled and administered from another machine using a standard Web browser.

The PowerPC platform is very well-suited to this type of multimedia application, and the G4 with AltiVec used in the Mac mini is an exceptionally powerful and flexible choice. This first article introduces you to the hardware's capabilities and walks you through installing and configuring Yellow Dog Linux so you can delve into some application code in the next article.
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