Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for Enterprise Volume Management System Mini How-To

Linux Mastering the Enterprise Volume Management System
Post date: April 13, 2005, 15:04 Category: System Views: 62
Tutorial quote: The Enterprise Volume Management System, or EVMS, is a disk, partition, and file system manager for Linux that claims to be a comprehensive tool for all disk management tasks. I ran across EVMS and found the idea appealing, so I decided to try it out. I've been working with it for a couple of weeks now, and this article describes what I found.
Gentoo Enterprise Volume Management System Mini How-To
Post date: April 13, 2005, 16:04 Category: System Views: 205
Tutorial quote: Here is a rough write-up on how I installed Gentoo 1.4_rc1 on EVMS, with the exception of the root partition. If you choose so, see the EVMS Howto for instructions on how to mount your root file system on an EVMS volume. I felt the hassle of dealing with a EVMS (or LVM, for that matter) root outweighs its advantages.

This is a very basic setup I used for my laptop. I only needed it so I don't have to worry about getting the partition sizes right from the beginning and to be able to adjust them with ease in the future. I've been using LVM with success but I couldn't find a way to resize the volume group itself. This, the fact that afaik there is no support for LVM in kernel 2.5.x and a new laptop needing a fresh installation made me try EVMS.
Gentoo EVMS Howto for Gentoo Linux
Post date: April 15, 2005, 00:04 Category: Hardware Views: 453
Tutorial quote: EVMS stands for Enterprise Volume Management System. It's a all-in-one utility written by IBM to manage disk partitions, logical volumes, software RAID and even filesystems.

It does everything from installing the partition table to mounting volumes, fscking and resizing them. It has a plugin mechanism which allow a user to extend EVMS with external drivers.
RedHat Getting started with RHEL4's built-in LVM tools
Post date: June 3, 2005, 12:06 Category: System Views: 172
Tutorial quote: Many Unix administrators I know (you know who you are), always used to smirk when I talked about Linux. They could always point to the fact that regardless of whatever I could say, they had journaling file systems, which they could manage using various Logical Volume Management (LVM) tools, and I couldn't touch that.

Well, not any more! Not only does Red Hat offer ext3 as their default file system, but they offer great management tools to boot. As we know, ext2 had a great lifespan, but it was not an enterprise-ready file system that could handle large disk partitions, fast recovery from systems crashes, or large amounts of files. Journaling file systems give you the ability to recover almost instantly from a crash, as you do not need to run fsck after a restart. Similar to how databases recover from crashes, a journaling file system tracks changes to file system metadata and pretty much guarantees that either all or no updates have completed. Of course, these file systems also need elaborate tools to help better configure and manage them accordingly.
OSX A mini-guide to Mac OS X for new Mini owners
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 78
Tutorial quote: One thing the Mac mini does not have is a comprehensive “welcome to OS X” guide. Printed documentation included with the mini is scanty — primarily EULA and warranty information, and Apple has never been one for flashy tutorials. That’s why we at Ars have pulled together a short list of things every newcomer to Mac OS X needs to know.

This guide is not intended to be comprehensive and answer every conceivable question Windows and Linux users will have about their new platform. What it does intend to do is give you the lowdown on some basic things: window management, accessing your Windows box from the Mac, and application behavior.
RedHat Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4
Post date: July 18, 2005, 18:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 176
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.
RedHat Taking advantage of SELinux in Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Post date: April 15, 2005, 17:04 Category: Security Views: 130
Tutorial quote: The release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 debuts the first commercially supported inclusion of Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux). An installation of Red Hat's latest enterprise operating system has SELinux installed and enabled by default. In the past SELinux has been criticized for a lack of commercial support, many big sites were unable to use it due to the lack of support (Fedora Core 3 doesn't have the support that they require). Now in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, SELinux is a supported part of the OS, and such objections to the use of SELinux have gone away. SELinux is now widely regarded as being suitable for the largest sites.
Gentoo Build your own Gentoo rescue LiveCD and USBStick
Post date: June 20, 2005, 00:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 153
Tutorial quote: I've written this how-to after trying to find a boot medium for my home gateway machine which could be used for system rescues and even installing Gentoo. Why not use the standard Gentoo Live CD you ask? Well my gateway machine is one of those small, silent and cool running mini-itx machines (http://www.mini-itx.com) and has no CDROM or floppy drive. I needed some way of getting Gentoo on there and some way of easily rescuing it when the need arises. The good news is that these VIA mini-tix machines are USB bootable and I much preferred the idea of having a little USB drive/stick that I could push into any USB bootable machine and boot into Linux rather than having to set up a PXE networked boot environment (which is also supported).
SuSe A Fresh Approach - SUSE 10.1 package management
Post date: May 12, 2006, 09:05 Category: System Views: 4
Tutorial quote: In SUSE 9.x and 10.0 the default package management software was the software management module and yast online update ( YOU ) in YaST2 and the susewatcher system tray applet. The susewatcher applet would faithfully report any security or system updates and would let you launch YOU to download and apply the updates. For third party software you could add online repositories to the installation sources module and ultimately you could manage all your software from the software management module, again in YaST2.
Yellow+Dog Installing Linux on the Mac mini
Post date: May 11, 2005, 08:05 Category: Installing Views: 112
Tutorial quote: The Mac mini is an ideal low-cost, high-performance PowerPC development platform for numerous applications. Learn how to install and configure Linux on the mini. Future articles will add the software required to make it into a stand-alone multimedia appliance.

This short series of articles shows you how to take a conveniently inexpensive, high-end PowerPC® platform (specifically, an Apple Mac mini) and build it into a home multimedia appliance using Linux™. At the end of the series, you'll have a stand-alone device that can play slide shows of images, audio, and movies, and that is controlled and administered from another machine using a standard Web browser.

The PowerPC platform is very well-suited to this type of multimedia application, and the G4 with AltiVec used in the Mac mini is an exceptionally powerful and flexible choice. This first article introduces you to the hardware's capabilities and walks you through installing and configuring Yellow Dog Linux so you can delve into some application code in the next article.