Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for Enterprise Volume Management System Mini How-To

Arch X11 Cursors
Post date: April 13, 2005, 21:04 Category: Desktop Views: 142
Tutorial quote: There are many cursor themes available for the X11 Windowing System besides the default black pointer.
This guide will instruct you on where to get them, installing them, and configuring them.
Linux Upstream Provider Woes? Point the Ping of Blame
Post date: April 14, 2005, 08:04 Category: Network Views: 42
Tutorial quote: Your users are complaining that "the Internet is, like, all slow." Users are always complaining, but you're seeing a lot of timeouts when you check mail, surf the Web, or try to log in for remote administration. Or even worse, latency is so bad that you keep getting killed all to heck in your favorite gory violent online multi-player game, so you know there is a problem. But there a lot of potential bottlenecks between your PC and the outside world, like your Internet gateway, proxy server, firewall, Internet service provider, and so forth, so where do you begin?

One of the best and most versatile network tools you can have is a notebook PC running Linux. This lets you plug in anywhere to run tests and find out what is going on. Make it a nothing-to-lose box--don't keep data on it so you can wipe and reinstall the operating system as necessary, because you want to be able to run tests outside of firewalls. Don't run any services. You can put a minimal iptables firewall on it, as there is no point in being totally exposed, but keep it simple. (Use MondoRescue to make a system snapshot for fast restores.)
FreeBSD Using Software RAID-1 with FreeBSD
Post date: November 28, 2005, 22:11 Category: System Views: 104
Tutorial quote: Have you ever needed a software RAID solution for a low-end server install? Perhaps you've wanted your workstation to take advantage of the redundancy provided by a disk mirror without investing in a hardware RAID controller. Has a prior painful configuration experience turned you off software RAID altogether on Unix systems?


Since 5.3-Release, FreeBSD comes with gmirror(8), which allows you to easily configure a software RAID 1 solution. While tutorials on gmirror exist, I found them to require either manual calculations of partition sizes with bsdlabel or the use of a fix-it floppy on an existing system.

It made more sense to me to configure RAID during the install of the operating system. I also wanted a procedure that was easy to follow and didn't introduce human error in the form of a math miscalculation. After cobbling together the available documentation and experimenting my way through various configurations, I came across a procedure that has worked well for me on several different systems. I also received valuable feedback from Pawel Jakub Dawidek, the author of gmirror, who gave some insight into some of the not yet documented features of gmirror.
Gentoo Monitoring all filesystem modifications
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Security Views: 58
Tutorial quote: After loading this kernel module you can monitor all file system alterations by simply typing: cat /dev/fsysmon

It's original purpose was to feed a daemon with data but nevertheless I found it to be even more useful as a standalone project.
Unix+clones Easy Automated Snapshot-Style Backups with Linux and Rsync
Post date: January 31, 2006, 19:01 Category: Software Views: 27
Tutorial quote: This document describes a method for generating automatic rotating "snapshot"-style backups on a Unix-based system, with specific examples drawn from the author's GNU/Linux experience. Snapshot backups are a feature of some high-end industrial file servers; they create the illusion of multiple, full backups per day without the space or processing overhead. All of the snapshots are read-only, and are accessible directly by users as special system directories. It is often possible to store several hours, days, and even weeks' worth of snapshots with slightly more than 2x storage. This method, while not as space-efficient as some of the proprietary technologies (which, using special copy-on-write filesystems, can operate on slightly more than 1x storage), makes use of only standard file utilities and the common rsync program, which is installed by default on most Linux distributions. Properly configured, the method can also protect against hard disk failure, root compromises, or even back up a network of heterogeneous desktops automatically.
Gentoo VHCS2 on Gentoo HowTo
Post date: April 20, 2005, 09:04 Category: Installing Views: 102
Tutorial quote: Want to build web hosting service on top of Gentoo? Well now you can with VHCS2 (Virtual Hosting Control System).
Debian Chrooted SSH HowTo
Post date: January 30, 2006, 02:01 Category: Security Views: 50
Tutorial quote: This tutorial describes how to install and configure OpenSSH so that it will allow chrooted sessions for users. With this setup, you can give your users shell access without having to fear that they can see your whole system. Your users will be jailed in a specific directory which they will not be able to break out of.
Linux DOS Emulation Under Linux
Post date: May 1, 2005, 13:05 Category: Emulation Views: 71
Tutorial quote: Whether you need to run some legacy corporate application, or just want to play some of those old classic DOS games, it's easy to get going.

I've done this on a Slackware 9.1 Linux system with a 2.4.22 kernel, running KDE 3.1.4. The process should be very similar for most reasonably recent Linux distros.
Linux Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part III
Post date: May 31, 2005, 10:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 144
Tutorial quote: For desktop and laptop users who want a fast-booting operating system, getting rid of services you do not need can appear to improve performance. Obviously, if you are new to Linux, though, you probably do not know which processes you can get rid of safely nor how to stop them and keep them from restarting at boot time.
FreeBSD FreeBSD Install Guide
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Installing Views: 97
Tutorial quote: A step-by-step guide to installing FreeBSD 5. It assumes moderate experience with linux and leaves you with a fully updated FreeBSD system.