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Fedora+Core How To Install VMware Server On A Fedora 7 Desktop
Post date: June 8, 2007, 18:06 Category: Installing Views: 2104 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install VMware Server on a Fedora 7 desktop. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems (virtual machines) such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system. This has the benefit that you can run multiple operating systems on the same hardware which saves a lot of money, and you can move virtual machines from one VMware Server to the next one (or to a system that has the VMware Player which is also free).
Fedora How To Use NTFS Write Support (ntfs-3g) On Fedora 7
Post date: August 22, 2007, 17:08 Category: Desktop Views: 920 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Normally Linux systems can only read from Windows NTFS partitions, but not write to them which can be very annoying if you have to work with Linux and Windows systems. This is where ntfs-3g comes into play. ntfs-3g is an open source, freely available NTFS driver for Linux with read and write support. This tutorial shows how to use ntfs-3g on a Fedora 7 desktop to read from and write to Windows NTFS drives and partitions.
Ubuntu Essential house keeping in Ubuntu
Post date: December 8, 2005, 05:12 Category: System Views: 1342 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: I started using Ubuntu Breezy ver 5.10 a month back on my machine. Prior to that I was exclusively into Fedora. What drew me to Ubuntu was the huge number of packages in its repositories including softwares which I find useful on a day-to-day basis like Tomboy which I had to compile from source in Fedora. But the Ubuntu CD comes with the base packages which support only open file formats. So if you want support for proprietary file formats like mp3 and quicktime support as well as install softwares not included on the CD, then you have to do some work.

I call it essential housekeeping because it is not exactly a problem, but only a matter of finding out how to get the necessary support. Here I share my experiences in putting the Ubuntu house in order on my machine.
FreeBSD FreeBSD Install Guide
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Installing Views: 1746 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: A step-by-step guide to installing FreeBSD 5. It assumes moderate experience with linux and leaves you with a fully updated FreeBSD system.
OSX A mini-guide to Mac OS X for new Mini owners
Post date: April 12, 2005, 12:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 1137 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: One thing the Mac mini does not have is a comprehensive “welcome to OS X” guide. Printed documentation included with the mini is scanty — primarily EULA and warranty information, and Apple has never been one for flashy tutorials. That’s why we at Ars have pulled together a short list of things every newcomer to Mac OS X needs to know.

This guide is not intended to be comprehensive and answer every conceivable question Windows and Linux users will have about their new platform. What it does intend to do is give you the lowdown on some basic things: window management, accessing your Windows box from the Mac, and application behavior.
Ubuntu Unofficial Ubuntu 5.04 Starter Guide
Post date: April 13, 2005, 17:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3174 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This is probably the best guide for beginners with Ubuntu. It will help you setup Ubuntu in no time. Amongst other things it will walk you through installing BitTorrent client, edonkey client, email clients, browsers and a lot more. Definitely worth checking out.
Fedora Setting Up A High-Availability Load Balancer With HAProxy/Heartbeat On Fedora 8
Post date: March 2, 2008, 06:03 Category: Installing Views: 1450 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up a two-node load balancer in an active/passive configuration with HAProxy and heartbeat on Fedora 8. The load balancer acts between the user and two (or more) Apache web servers that hold the same content. The load balancer passes the requests to the web servers and it also checks their health. If one of them is down, all requests will automatically be redirected to the remaining web server(s). In addition to that, the two load balancer nodes monitor each other using heartbeat. If the master fails, the slave becomes the master - users will not notice any disruption of the service. HAProxy is session-aware - you can use it with any web application that makes use of sessions like forums, shopping carts, etc.
OpenSUSE rpmorphan - Find & delete orphaned packages in openSUSE
Post date: February 8, 2009, 13:02 Category: System Views: 739 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: rpmorphan is a free opensource utility to find orphaned packages on your openSUSE installation. rpmorphan determines which packages on the system has no other package(s) depending on their installation, and lists these packages.
Debian Rolling your own Debian packages (part 1)
Post date: January 21, 2006, 00:01 Category: Software Views: 808 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This two-part article explains how to make a Debian package of simple piece of software, presumably something you have written yourself. Although building a new package is more complex than rebuilding one or having one generated, the idea is that it is actually surprisingly simple to create basic Debian packages. In fact, if you can make software install into a temporary installation tree, you're already 90% done! This text provides a quick alternative to the more comprehensive Debian New Maintainers' Guide. Only knowledge of Makefiles and the basic Debian package tools is assumed.

The first part of this article will continue with some preliminary information about Debian packages. In the second part we walk through a concrete packaging example.
Linux+Mint Installation Guide: Linux Mint 4.0 Daryna (a.k.a. The Perfect Desktop)
Post date: November 22, 2007, 05:11 Category: Desktop Views: 1915 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can set up a Linux Mint 4.0 (Daryna) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge. Linux Mint 4.0 is a Linux distribution based on Ubuntu 7.10 that has lots of packages in its repositories (like multimedia codecs, Adobe Flash, Adobe Reader, Skype, Google Earth, etc.) that are relatively hard to install on other distributions; it therefore provides a user-friendly desktop experience even for Linux newbies.