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Unix+clones How to Set Up a Jabber Server
Post date: April 12, 2005, 12:04 Category: Software Views: 37
Tutorial quote: Unless you have been living under a rock for the past few years, you must have heard about instant messaging and how it has changed the world of communications over the Internet. According to http://www.webopedia.com, Instant Messaging (IM) is a service that alerts users when their friends or colleagues are on line and allows them to communicate in real time through private online chat areas. Two of the most popular IM services are AOL Instant Messenger (AIM) and MSN Messenger. Unfortunately, most of the publicly available servers use proprietary protocols that only allow you to communicate with users on the same system. These systems are not compatible with each other and can't be accessed from other clients.

Jabber is an open source implementation of the IM server that aims to change this. It uses streaming XML protocols that are free, open, and public. These protocols have been formalized by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) as the approved instant messaging and presence technology under the name of XMPP. The first Jabber technologies were developed in 1998 by Jeremie Miller and is now used on thousands of servers world-wide to enable millions of users to communicate with each other.

The biggest advantage of the Jabber server when compared with commercial IM servers is that, since it is open source, anyone can run a Jabber server and it can be restricted to a specific community like a company work force or a group of friends. In this article, I will document the steps I took to set up a Jabber server and how I managed to overcome the difficulties I faced. Hopefully this will make it easier for you to set up your own Jabber server.
Gentoo Tunneling the hard way: using slirp, pppd and socat
Post date: January 29, 2006, 08:01 Category: Network Views: 50
Tutorial quote: Every now and then you might come across a "bad" ISP. The one I have at home for example is dropping UDP packets ever so often when I try to play online games -- and it tends to drop random packets while I try to log onto a gameserver too which makes a certain game I like to play crash during the loading phase so it can't recover. I also heard of other ISPs blocking certain ports on external servers -- universities for example seem to like blocking p2p network ports and the school i was attending till last august blocked everything but port 80 for http -- including ftp which made even on-topic "research" a pita at times.
Usually there's three ways of working around this problem if "giving up" is not an option to you: a) change your ISP, b) use ssh to redirect ports, c) connect to an external VPN to route for you. a) can be tricky -- it's impossible if you're sharing the link with your parents and they insist on their email addresses or in the university/workplace/school scenario. b) will only work with single port/host combinations and for c) you will need a full-fledged rootbox idling around on the internet -- which tend to be expensive and "virtual servers" might not work because those often don't include tun/tap devices and/or kernel-level ppp support if you rent them and in case you rented them you probably can't fiddle around with its kernel to enable it (that was my problem at least). If any of this rings a bell to you, read on and discover method d)
Unix+clones Setting Up Samba 3.x
Post date: April 15, 2005, 19:04 Category: Network Views: 40
Tutorial quote: Recently I got the opportunity to setup a new lab for a small school. The server runs Linux and the workstations run WindowsXP. There are 3 levels of access on the workstations (admin, teacher, and student) and security on the workstations is based on Windows policies applied at logon.
Unix+clones Two-in-one DNS server with BIND9
Post date: April 1, 2006, 00:04 Category: Software Views: 15
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows you how to configure BIND9 DNS server to serve an internal network and an external network at the same time with different set of information. To accomplish that goal, a new feature of BIND9 called view is used. As a tutorial it'll walk you through the whole set up, but initial knowledge of BIND and DNS is required, there are plenty of documents that cover that information on the Internet.
Unix+clones Encrypted NFS with OpenSSH
Post date: May 21, 2005, 15:05 Category: Network Views: 44
Tutorial quote: NFS is a widely deployed, mature, and understood protocol that allows computers to share files over a network. The main problems with NFS are that it relies on the inherently insecure UDP protocol, transactions are not encrypted, hosts and users cannot be easily authenticated, and its difficulty in firewalling. This article provides a solution to most of these problems for Linux clients and servers. These principles may also be applied to any UNIX server with ssh installed. This article assumes basic knowledge of NFS and firewalling for Linux.
Unix+clones Configuring Apache - Don't Succumb To The "Slashdot Effect"
Post date: January 30, 2006, 22:01 Category: Optimizing Views: 28
Tutorial quote: Like many techno-geeks I host my LAMP website on a cheap ($150) computer and my broadband connection. I have also wondered what would happen if my site was linked on Slashdot or Digg. Specifically, would my setup be able to survive the "Slashdot Effect?" A Pentium 100mhz can easily saturate a T1's worth of bandwidth and my upload speed is capped (supposedly) at 384kbps, so the server should easily be able to handle that. My bandwidth will be saturated before the server is incapacitated, at least that's the idea.
Unix+clones Providing FTP Services with PureFTPd
Post date: April 15, 2005, 17:04 Category: Network Views: 39
Tutorial quote: If you work around computers for any length of time you'll probably run into an FTP server. FTP stands for File Transfer Protocol and FTP servers are used to do just that, transfer files. FTP has been around for a long time, much longer than P2P programs, or the World Wide Web, in its day it was the primary method of sharing files with others on the Internet, and it remains very popular even today. This tutorial will cover the installation and setup of an FTP server using PureFTPd.
FreeBSD Upgrading FreeBSD
Post date: April 1, 2006, 00:04 Category: System Views: 15
Tutorial quote: This document started as a follow up to The Ultimate Multimedia Server Guide and how to go about keeping your server up to date and patched with the latest O/S patches and security patches. The other reason for this document was to try and create an easy to follow update guide for the not so Unix savvy users that visit my website from time to time. My first time trying to upgrade FreeBSD from sources went well but trying to understand and piece together all the other documentation was more of a daunting task than actually upgrading.
Gentoo Darcs - easy VCS alternative to CVS
Post date: June 21, 2005, 19:06 Category: Network Views: 74
Tutorial quote: This is a brief introduction to Darcs - a distributed SCM system and a healthy alternative to CVS. It will show you an easy, more modern approach to VCS. The project I contribute to (formerly XWT, renamed to Vexi) has greatly benefitted from moving to Darcs from CVS because now we can make rapid progress without the fear of making bad commits to the server or the server being down. People can code and pull other's code at their own convenience.
OpenBSD Apache - Serving up the Web
Post date: April 11, 2006, 18:04 Category: Network Views: 19
Tutorial quote: The Apache Web Server is installed as part of the OpenBSD base system. This guide will help you configure the web server: (Apache 1.3.12 is released with OpenBSD 2.7 and 1.3.9 with OpenBSD 2.6)

To see how configurable the Apache/OpenBSD combination is we also look at allowing administrators to remotely review the server's status, we setup the system so we allow users on our system to have their own personal web-space. Of course, for the security counscious you probably want to turn some of these things off after you get things up and running.