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Linux Sawing Linux Logs with Simple Tools
Post date: April 14, 2005, 08:04 Category: Security Views: 37
Tutorial quote: So there you are with all of your Linux servers humming along happily. You have tested, tweaked, and configured until they are performing at their peak of perfection. Users are hardly whining at all. Life is good. You may relax and indulge in some nice, relaxing rounds of TuxKart. After all, you earned it.

Except for one little remaining chore: monitoring your log files. [insert horrible alarming music of your choice here.] You're conscientious, so you know you can't just ignore the logs until there's a problem, especially for public services like Web and mail. Somewhere up in the pointy-haired suites, they may even be plotting to require you to track and analyze all sorts of server statistics.

Not to worry, for there are many ways to implement data reduction, which is what log parsing is all about. You want to slice and dice your logs to present only the data you're interested in viewing. Unless you wish to devote your entire life to manually analyzing log files. Even if you only pay attention to logfiles when you're debugging a problem, having some tools to weed out the noise is helpful.
Debian Configuring Dynamic DNS & DHCP on Debian Stable
Post date: February 2, 2006, 20:02 Category: Network Views: 55
Tutorial quote: For the average home computer user there is no need to install a complex package such as the Internet Software Consortium's BIND DNS or DHCP server, since there are far simpler lower resource tools to use, for example dnsmasq. For those who you wish to learn how to use ISC's BIND and DHCP, for example as a learning exercise, this is how I got it all to work in Debian Sarge, the current stable version of Debian GNU/Linux.

This short article was prompted by my question on the Debian-Administration forum site, where I was able to get some answers to the issues I faced and I did promise to post a solution if I got one.
RedHat Tips & tricks: Performance tuning
Post date: November 25, 2005, 19:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 134
Tutorial quote: Advanced tips on optimizing your Red Hat server.
Debian Setting up an SSL server with Apache2
Post date: February 12, 2006, 02:02 Category: Network Views: 54
Tutorial quote: With the introduction of the Apache2 packages in Debian it is much simpler to create and use a secure SSL protected webserver than in the old days with Apache 1.3, here we'll show how it is done.
Fedora+Core How To Install A Custom Iptables Firewall
Post date: March 31, 2006, 16:03 Category: Network Views: 27
Tutorial quote: This guide is to show you how to edit your iptables if you're running on a server This guide info came from iptables rocks, but i edited a bunch of data to make it suitable for what i want it to do.
Debian ACL(Access Control List) Configuration
Post date: April 4, 2006, 16:04 Category: Installing Views: 21
Tutorial quote: Access Control Lists (ACLs) provide a much more flexible way of specifying permissions on a file or other object than the standard Unix user/group/owner system. Windows NT and above, when running on an NTFS partition, use ACLs to specify permissions on files and directories. This document attempts to show how you can enable ACL support on your Linux box and use Samba to provide an SMB file server for use by machines in a Windows 2000 domain.

ACLs are best stored in the actual file system itself. To that end, there are patches available for ext2 and ext3 that enable ACL support using Extended Attributes (EAs). SGI's XFS also has ACL support built in, but XFS is not currently covered in this document.
FreeBSD Setting up a Secure Subversion Server
Post date: May 17, 2005, 04:05 Category: Network Views: 126
Tutorial quote: This article demonstrates how to create a secure repository using Subversion. The next installment will show how to train your users to access the repository using a GUI client.
Linux Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 1
Post date: April 13, 2005, 15:04 Category: Hardware Views: 114
Tutorial quote: Wireless hardware for Linux is a moving target. The wireless network adapter that worked fine with Linux yesterday may be released with an unsupported radio chipset today, and with no indication of the change. So buyer beware--always confirm the chipset before you buy. The good news is a lot of wireless adapters have native Linux support, and for those that don't, the NdisWrapper utility lets you use the Windows drivers on your Linux box.
Linux Linux Filesystems and Partitioning: A Primer
Post date: June 24, 2005, 10:06 Category: System Views: 87
Tutorial quote: We recently to shed some light on Linux, particularly for users unfamiliar with the system. The article received quite a response from around the world and so we will be doing some follow-up articles to teach all those interested, the ins and outs of Linux. In this article, we will be discussing what partitioning is, how to choose a filesystem, how to have Windows and Linux installed on your hard drive at the same time, and more.
OpenBSD Using OpenBSD
Post date: April 26, 2006, 10:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 24
Tutorial quote: Many people responded to the call for OpenBSD and OpenSSH donations by purchasing an OpenBSD CD set. Those CDs are beginning to arrive in the mail, and when they do, how are you going to use them? If you're a software enthusiast who has never used OpenBSD before, you might enjoy installing it by yourself and figuring it out as you go. If, however, you're looking for a more practical approach to using OpenBSD as a desktop or server operating system, here's a guide to get you started.