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Linux Configure Multiple Network Profiles on Linux
Post date: April 12, 2005, 22:04 Category: Network Views: 30
Tutorial quote: Mobile Linux users face some interesting (OK, vexing) challenges when they want to plug into different networks. Any Linux system will easily support all manner of networking profiles--dialup, ISDN, Ethernet, wireless--the tricky bit is configuration. Manually re-configuring a PC for every connection is low on most users' lists of "fun things to do." You can be an ace scripting guru and fiddle up something yourself, or you can find a nice ready-made utility to do the work for you. Unfortunately, I have not found a universal utility to do this. However, there are a lot of utilities specific to various distributions, and an assortment of other utilities.
RedHat Taking advantage of SELinux in Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Post date: April 15, 2005, 17:04 Category: Security Views: 130
Tutorial quote: The release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 debuts the first commercially supported inclusion of Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux). An installation of Red Hat's latest enterprise operating system has SELinux installed and enabled by default. In the past SELinux has been criticized for a lack of commercial support, many big sites were unable to use it due to the lack of support (Fedora Core 3 doesn't have the support that they require). Now in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, SELinux is a supported part of the OS, and such objections to the use of SELinux have gone away. SELinux is now widely regarded as being suitable for the largest sites.
OSX Panther versus Tiger
Post date: April 29, 2005, 20:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 106
Tutorial quote: According to Apple, "...unmodified applications that use the system math functions will get an automatic performance boost on the G5..." when switching from Panther to Tiger. We decided to run some tests to see if we got a speed gain right out of the box with applications that we suspect use system math functions.
Debian ACL(Access Control List) Configuration
Post date: April 4, 2006, 16:04 Category: Installing Views: 21
Tutorial quote: Access Control Lists (ACLs) provide a much more flexible way of specifying permissions on a file or other object than the standard Unix user/group/owner system. Windows NT and above, when running on an NTFS partition, use ACLs to specify permissions on files and directories. This document attempts to show how you can enable ACL support on your Linux box and use Samba to provide an SMB file server for use by machines in a Windows 2000 domain.

ACLs are best stored in the actual file system itself. To that end, there are patches available for ext2 and ext3 that enable ACL support using Extended Attributes (EAs). SGI's XFS also has ACL support built in, but XFS is not currently covered in this document.
Linux Benchmarking Filesystems
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 95
Tutorial quote: I recently purchased a Western Digital 250GB/8M/7200RPM drive and wondered which journaling file system I should use. I currently use ext2 on my other, smaller hard drives. Upon reboot or unclean shutdown, e2fsck takes a while on drives only 40 and 60 gigabytes. Therefore I knew using a journaling file system would be my best bet. The question is: which is the best? In order to determine this I used common operations that Linux users may perform on a regular basis instead of using benchmark tools such as Bonnie or Iozone. I wanted a "real life" benchmark analysis. A quick analogy: Just because the Ethernet-Over-Power-Lines may advertise 10mbps (1.25MB/s), in real world tests, peak speed is only 5mbps (625KB/s). This is why I chose to run my own tests versus using hard drive benchmarking tools.
Debian The Perfect Xen 3.0 Setup For Debian
Post date: April 1, 2006, 00:04 Category: System Views: 12
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.1) on a Debian Sarge (3.1) system.

Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
OpenSUSE Hacking OpenSUSE
Post date: December 3, 2005, 12:12 Category: System Views: 133
Tutorial quote: There's more to SUSE Linux than simply installing it and going to work. To get the most from the operating system, you'll probably want to do some post-install fine tuning. This article by Jem Matzan explains how to: add download sources to YaST; install the Mozilla Thunderbird email client; add support for Java, Flash, Acrobat, Windows Media, MP3s, and RealMedia; play DVDs -- and more. It serves as a useful supplement to Steven J. Rosen's excellent how-to, "Installing SUSE Linux 10 on a Laptop," recently published here on DesktopLinux.com. Enjoy . . . !
Linux Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part III
Post date: May 31, 2005, 10:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 144
Tutorial quote: For desktop and laptop users who want a fast-booting operating system, getting rid of services you do not need can appear to improve performance. Obviously, if you are new to Linux, though, you probably do not know which processes you can get rid of safely nor how to stop them and keep them from restarting at boot time.
FreeBSD FreeBSD Install Guide
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Installing Views: 97
Tutorial quote: A step-by-step guide to installing FreeBSD 5. It assumes moderate experience with linux and leaves you with a fully updated FreeBSD system.
SmoothWall Install SquidGuard on Smoothwall
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Software Views: 254
Tutorial quote: squidGuard describes itself as: "An ultrafast and free filter, redirector and access controller for Squid". In my experience, it is the ideal web filter for use with Smoothwall and IpCop since it is lightweight and easy to set up. I use it on an i486, 33Mhz system with 18Mb of Ram and 500Mb of hard drive - and while there is a minor performance hit, the hit is not significant.

This simple how-to describes the steps I took to install squidGuard on my system - it should work for yours too.