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Search results for HOWTO backup your linux system using bash, tar and netcat

Gentoo Enterprise Volume Management System Mini How-To
Post date: April 13, 2005, 16:04 Category: System Views: 205
Tutorial quote: Here is a rough write-up on how I installed Gentoo 1.4_rc1 on EVMS, with the exception of the root partition. If you choose so, see the EVMS Howto for instructions on how to mount your root file system on an EVMS volume. I felt the hassle of dealing with a EVMS (or LVM, for that matter) root outweighs its advantages.

This is a very basic setup I used for my laptop. I only needed it so I don't have to worry about getting the partition sizes right from the beginning and to be able to adjust them with ease in the future. I've been using LVM with success but I couldn't find a way to resize the volume group itself. This, the fact that afaik there is no support for LVM in kernel 2.5.x and a new laptop needing a fresh installation made me try EVMS.
Unix+clones Chkrootkit Portsentry Howto
Post date: April 15, 2005, 19:04 Category: Security Views: 67
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install chkrootkit and portsentry. It should work (maybe with slight changes concerning paths etc.) on all *nix operating systems.

Chkrootkit "is a tool to locally check for signs of a rootkit" (from http://www.chkrootkit.org).

"The Sentry tools provide host-level security services for the Unix platform. PortSentry, Logcheck/LogSentry, and HostSentry protect against portscans, automate log file auditing, and detect suspicious login activity on a continuous basis" (from http://sourceforge.net/projects/sentrytools/).

This howto is meant as a practical guide.
Gentoo Gentoo VSFTPD Howto
Post date: May 4, 2005, 14:05 Category: Network Views: 728
Tutorial quote: This serves as an explicit guide as to how one goes about setting up a VSFTPD server on a Gentoo Linux computer. Though written for Gentoo, these instructions apply to other Linux distributions as well.
Ubuntu SAMBA (Domaincontroller) Server For Small Workgroups With Ubuntu 5.10 "Breezy Badger"
Post date: December 14, 2005, 14:12 Category: Network Views: 147
Tutorial quote: This is a detailed description about the steps to set up a Ubuntu based server (Ubuntu 5.10 - Breezy Badger) to act as file- and print server for Windows (tm) workstations in small workgroups. This howto uses the tdb backend for SAMBA to store passwords and account information. This is suitable for workgroups for up to 250 users and is easier to setup than an LDAP backend. A second howto covering the installation of LDAP + SAMBA will be published soon.
Linux HOWTO: Hosting a Subversion Repository
Post date: April 17, 2006, 13:04 Category: Software Views: 24
Tutorial quote: This document explains in details the procedure to setup a subversion repository (with trac/viewvc) in Linux based environment. Depending on the needs, one of the following three schemes can be selected.
Unix+clones Good-looking fonts in X Windows
Post date: April 23, 2005, 05:04 Category: Desktop Views: 98
Tutorial quote: What makes the difference betweek "ugly" and "beautiful" fonts? Several things.

One of them is anti-aliasing (or AA in short). It's the technique which adds gray pixels in various shades around the edges of black text and thus blurs the jagged and pixelated edges. It works with other colors, too.

Another thing is having good quality fonts to start with. Font which are ugly by nature or don't scale well to various sizes are not much nicer when anti-aliased. See what kinds of fonts are out there by browsing through the Font HOWTO (not the same as the FDU HOWTO above).

Finally, there's the issue of readability which applies to you directly. How well does the end-product look anyhow? Do you really need anti-aliasing for an 8 pixel text? And other similar questions, which you'll learn how to answer according to your own preferences.
Linux Linux System Calls
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 39
Tutorial quote: Tutorial about Linux system call implementation and adding a new system call in Linux.
Linux USB Flash Memory HOWTO
Post date: April 15, 2005, 20:04 Category: Hardware Views: 91
Tutorial quote: The purpose of this document is to describe procedures for implementing USB flash memory devices (memory sticks) on Linux.
Solaris How to Perform System Boot and Shutdown Procedures for Solaris 10
Post date: February 6, 2006, 02:02 Category: System Views: 43
Tutorial quote: System startup requires an understanding of the hardware and the operating system functions that are required to bring the system to a running state. This chapter discusses the operations that the system must perform from the time you power on the system until you receive a system logon prompt. In addition, it covers the steps required to properly shut down a system. After reading this chapter, you’ll understand how to boot the system from the OpenBoot programmable read-only memory (PROM) and what operations must take place to start up the kernel and Unix system processes.
SuSe Installing FreeNX Server on SUSE 10
Post date: December 27, 2005, 10:12 Category: Network Views: 125
Tutorial quote: Not long ago, I reviewed SUSE Linux 10 and found that they had included the latest version of FreeNX (a free version of NoMachine's NX Server) on the installation media. I'd never really tried FreeNX at that point but had heard some good things about it, so I thought I'd give it a shot. Well, once it was installed and working I have to say I was immediately impressed by how simple it was to setup and how well (read: fast) it performed over a WAN connection. I was literally able to get my desktop at home from anywhere else in the world and get near-local speed. Normally, working on a remote system is alright until you need to type in any shape or form. There was almost no delay from the time I'd press a key to the time it would show up on the screen. This is what sold me on FreeNX and prompted me to offer to write a HOWTO on the topic. I was overwhelmed with email from our readers asking that I write it... so here we are!