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Search results for HOWTO backup your linux system using bash, tar and netcat

Debian Debian RAID 1/5 system installer
Post date: May 28, 2005, 18:05 Category: Installing Views: 193
Tutorial quote: Instructions for installing a very clean Debian GNU/Linux system that boots from RAID 1, and has RAID 1 or RAID 5 root and data filesystems.

The examples assume two identical harddrives, sda and sdb, on which after a small boot partition, 1 GB is used for swap, 25 GB is used for the root filesystem and everything else is for a big "data" partition that will hold non-system stuff.
Unix+clones Mysql Cluster: Two webserver setup (three servers required for true redundancy)
Post date: July 11, 2005, 08:07 Category: Network Views: 80
Tutorial quote: This HOWTO was designed for a classic setup of two servers behind a loadbalancer. The aim is to have true redundancy - either server can be unplugged and yet the site will remain up.
SuSe User-Mode Linux
Post date: December 8, 2005, 08:12 Category: Software Views: 137
Tutorial quote: One of the largest efforts involved with software engineering is testing the software to make sure that it works as designed. Testing can require several different types of system configurations and could require multiple instances of Linux. One way to create this type of environment is to use a virtual machine.

User-Mode Linux (UML) is a fully functional Linux kernel. It runs its own scheduler and virtual memory (VM) system, relying on the host kernel for hardware support. It includes virtual block, network, and serial devices to provide an environment that is almost as full-featured as a hardware-based machine. UML cannot destroy the host machine. Furthermore, the UML block devices, also called disks, can be files on the native Linux file system, so you cannot affect the native block devices. This is very useful when you're testing and debugging block operations.
FreeBSD Building a FreeBSD Build System
Post date: April 14, 2006, 20:04 Category: System Views: 24
Tutorial quote: When you finish this article, you will have an unbeatable update system. Even mergemaster will work faster. You will have an update system in which a machine update/upgrade will take less than 10 minutes.
Debian Debian Kernel Compile Howto (Kernel 2.6)
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: System Views: 93
Tutorial quote: In some cases you might want to compile your own kernel that suits your needs better than the standard kernel that comes with your distribution. I will describe how to do this on a Debian machine. Please note that this tutorial is for kernel 2.6 only!
Unix+clones Xen Disk I/O benchmarking: NetBSD dom0 vs Linux dom0
Post date: April 21, 2005, 06:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 107
Tutorial quote: Xen is a relatively new technology to enable several virtual machines (domU) to run on one computer. The purpose of this article is to determine what operating system (NetBSD or Linux) should be selected as domain 0 (dom0) operating system to get the best performance when running several CPU and disk intensive virtual machines at the same time.
Linux DOS Emulation Under Linux
Post date: May 1, 2005, 13:05 Category: Emulation Views: 71
Tutorial quote: Whether you need to run some legacy corporate application, or just want to play some of those old classic DOS games, it's easy to get going.

I've done this on a Slackware 9.1 Linux system with a 2.4.22 kernel, running KDE 3.1.4. The process should be very similar for most reasonably recent Linux distros.
Linux Linux Filesystems and Partitioning: A Primer
Post date: June 24, 2005, 10:06 Category: System Views: 87
Tutorial quote: We recently to shed some light on Linux, particularly for users unfamiliar with the system. The article received quite a response from around the world and so we will be doing some follow-up articles to teach all those interested, the ins and outs of Linux. In this article, we will be discussing what partitioning is, how to choose a filesystem, how to have Windows and Linux installed on your hard drive at the same time, and more.
Linux Linux stateful firewall design
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 40
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows you how to use netfilter to set up a powerful Linux stateful firewall. All you need is an existing Linux system that's currently using a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel. A laptop, workstation, router or server with at a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel will do. You should be reasonably familiar with standard network terminology like IP addresses, source and destination port numbers, TCP, UDP and ICMP, etc. By the end of the tutorial, you'll understand how Linux stateful firewalls are put together and you'll have several example configurations to use in your own projects.
RedHat Getting started with RHEL4's built-in LVM tools
Post date: June 3, 2005, 12:06 Category: System Views: 172
Tutorial quote: Many Unix administrators I know (you know who you are), always used to smirk when I talked about Linux. They could always point to the fact that regardless of whatever I could say, they had journaling file systems, which they could manage using various Logical Volume Management (LVM) tools, and I couldn't touch that.

Well, not any more! Not only does Red Hat offer ext3 as their default file system, but they offer great management tools to boot. As we know, ext2 had a great lifespan, but it was not an enterprise-ready file system that could handle large disk partitions, fast recovery from systems crashes, or large amounts of files. Journaling file systems give you the ability to recover almost instantly from a crash, as you do not need to run fsck after a restart. Similar to how databases recover from crashes, a journaling file system tracks changes to file system metadata and pretty much guarantees that either all or no updates have completed. Of course, these file systems also need elaborate tools to help better configure and manage them accordingly.