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Debian How To Set Up A Load-Balanced MySQL Cluster
Post date: March 31, 2006, 14:03 Category: Software Views: 13
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to configure a MySQL 5 cluster with three nodes: two storage nodes and one management node. This cluster is load-balanced by a high-availability load balancer that in fact has two nodes that use the Ultra Monkey package which provides heartbeat (for checking if the other node is still alive) and ldirectord (to split up the requests to the nodes of the MySQL cluster).

In this document I use Debian Sarge for all nodes. Therefore the setup might differ a bit for other distributions. The MySQL version I use in this setup is 5.0.19. If you do not want to use MySQL 5, you can use MySQL 4.1 as well, although I haven't tested it.

This howto is meant as a practical guide; it does not cover the theoretical backgrounds. They are treated in a lot of other documents in the web.
RedHat Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4
Post date: July 18, 2005, 18:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 176
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.
Unix+clones Easy Automated Snapshot-Style Backups with Linux and Rsync
Post date: January 31, 2006, 19:01 Category: Software Views: 27
Tutorial quote: This document describes a method for generating automatic rotating "snapshot"-style backups on a Unix-based system, with specific examples drawn from the author's GNU/Linux experience. Snapshot backups are a feature of some high-end industrial file servers; they create the illusion of multiple, full backups per day without the space or processing overhead. All of the snapshots are read-only, and are accessible directly by users as special system directories. It is often possible to store several hours, days, and even weeks' worth of snapshots with slightly more than 2x storage. This method, while not as space-efficient as some of the proprietary technologies (which, using special copy-on-write filesystems, can operate on slightly more than 1x storage), makes use of only standard file utilities and the common rsync program, which is installed by default on most Linux distributions. Properly configured, the method can also protect against hard disk failure, root compromises, or even back up a network of heterogeneous desktops automatically.
Linux Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part II
Post date: May 24, 2005, 14:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 135
Tutorial quote: As we discussed in last week's article, for most of its existence, people have distributed Linux as a workstation or a server rather than as a desktop. The default workstation that evolved has existed mostly for use by developers. So, when you install a Linux distribution with a graphical interface, it generally looks like what a developer might want. In addition, it performs similar to how many UNIX workstations work, which can seem slow.

In this article, we continue to look at the Linux desktop in a different light. Here, we think of it as a computer system with a fast interface that we can optimize for the knowledge worker and consumer.
Linux How Linux boots: Runlevels and init
Post date: April 12, 2005, 19:04 Category: System Views: 47
Tutorial quote: Identifying each stage of the boot process is invaluable in fixing boot problems and understanding the system as a whole.
Linux Benchmarking Maildir Delivery on Linux Filesystems
Post date: April 12, 2005, 03:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 65
Tutorial quote: The goal of this set of benchmarks is to determine which of the leading Linux filesystems (ext2, ext3, ReiserFS, and XFS) offer the best performance when used for accepting maildir deliveries. The resulting system should be a good balance of delivery and retrieval performance under potentially high concurrent filesystem load.
Ubuntu Windows to Ubuntu Transition Guide
Post date: April 8, 2006, 11:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 84
Tutorial quote: Alright, so you have successfully installed Ubuntu Linux, but now what do you do with it? You are in the right place. I am going to get you started with a guide on how to use your new Ubuntu system. This transition guide is targeted at existing Windows users and will show you how to do program installations, a little system configuration, but primarily highlight some Windows "replacement" programs for common applications you can't live without. This guide's intent is to introduce you to equivalent programs to what you are accustomed to and, hopefully, to cover a good amount of what you might want in a new install. I am basing the content on what I have personally experienced, email feedback from my installation article, questions from the PC Mech Forums, and common topics from the Ubuntu Forums. Hopefully this will answer a lot of questions you may have before you ever have them.
RedHat Getting back my GNOME desktop from the clutches of the GNOME configuration system
Post date: July 18, 2005, 18:07 Category: Desktop Views: 86
Tutorial quote: My problem: as a user I managed to lock myself out of my GNOME desktop though a careless setting of Preferences-> Resolution.

In determining my solution I learned some key lessons about the GNOME configuration system.
Linux Linux 2.6: Compiling and Installing
Post date: April 15, 2005, 18:04 Category: System Views: 55
Tutorial quote: We'll look at the process of compiling and installing a new kernel safely, without overwriting the existing kernel.

You can install as many kernels as you like on a Linux system, and select the one you want to run at boot time. This makes it easy to test different kernels, and different kernel configurations, with particular sets of hardware or applications. The wise network admin always tests new kernels before running them on production machines.
SGI Installing IRIX 6.5 Across a Network
Post date: May 21, 2005, 06:05 Category: Installing Views: 119
Tutorial quote: Installing across a network may be desirable for a number of reasons, usually speed, convenience (disks/CDROM attached to remote system) or necessity. I've done network installs on O2s, Octanes and Indys; in each case, a remote disk file system contained local copies of all the relevant 6.5 media.