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CentOS Managing OpenVZ With The Vtonf Control Panel On CentOS 5.2
Post date: December 2, 2008, 09:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 1348 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Vtonf is a free web-based control panel (released under the GPL license) for managing virtual private servers (VPS) based on OpenVZ. It makes it very easy to create and manage OpenVZ VMs even for people with little technical knowledge. Right now, Vtonf is available only for RedHat, Fedora, and CentOS (support for Debian is planned), therefore I describe its installation and usage on a CentOS 5.2 server.
OpenSUSE Hacking OpenSUSE
Post date: December 3, 2005, 11:12 Category: System Views: 2950 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: There's more to SUSE Linux than simply installing it and going to work. To get the most from the operating system, you'll probably want to do some post-install fine tuning. This article by Jem Matzan explains how to: add download sources to YaST; install the Mozilla Thunderbird email client; add support for Java, Flash, Acrobat, Windows Media, MP3s, and RealMedia; play DVDs -- and more. It serves as a useful supplement to Steven J. Rosen's excellent how-to, "Installing SUSE Linux 10 on a Laptop," recently published here on DesktopLinux.com. Enjoy . . . !
OpenSUSE Krusader - Advanced Twinpanel File Manager in openSUSE
Post date: October 10, 2008, 17:10 Category: Desktop Views: 782 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Krusader is an advanced twin panel (commander style) file manager for KDE and other desktops in the *nix world, similar to Midnight or Total Commander. It provides all the file management features you could possibly want with features like extensive archive handling, mounted filesystem support, FTP, advanced search module, an internal viewer/editor, directory synchronisation, file content comparisons, powerful batch renaming and much much more
Linux How To Convert Songs From An Audio CD Into MP3/Ogg Files With K3b
Post date: August 7, 2007, 18:08 Category: Desktop Views: 872 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This guide describes how you can use the CD/DVD burning application K3b to convert songs from an audio CD into MP3 or Ogg files that you can use on your MP3 player, for example (if you choose the Ogg format, your MP3 player must support it).
OpenSUSE Banshee 1.2 - Audio Video Podcast last.fm player for openSUSE
Post date: August 5, 2008, 12:08 Category: Desktop Views: 973 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Banshee is a simple but powerful multimedia player with Audio/Video playback support, subscribe and playback podcasts and last.fm radio from Banshee. With Banshee1.2 Import, organize, play, share your music and videos using Banshee’s simple but powerful interface. Rip CDs, play and sync your iPod, create playlists, and burn audio and MP3 CDs
SuSe Avant Window Navigator (AWN) Mac OS like Dock in openSUSE
Post date: August 3, 2008, 08:08 Category: Desktop Views: 1383 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Avant Window Navigator (Awn) is a dock-like bar which sits at the bottom of the screen on your Linux Distriution. It has support for launchers, task lists, and third party applets. The dock at the bottom of the screen gives a nice apple Mac like look for your openSUSE. There are a lot of Themes Plugins and Applets that can be added onto the dock.
Linux Configure Multiple Network Profiles on Linux
Post date: April 12, 2005, 21:04 Category: Network Views: 899 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Mobile Linux users face some interesting (OK, vexing) challenges when they want to plug into different networks. Any Linux system will easily support all manner of networking profiles--dialup, ISDN, Ethernet, wireless--the tricky bit is configuration. Manually re-configuring a PC for every connection is low on most users' lists of "fun things to do." You can be an ace scripting guru and fiddle up something yourself, or you can find a nice ready-made utility to do the work for you. Unfortunately, I have not found a universal utility to do this. However, there are a lot of utilities specific to various distributions, and an assortment of other utilities.
Ubuntu VirtualBox 2: How To Pass Through USB Devices To Guests On An Ubuntu 8.10 Host
Post date: April 5, 2009, 07:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 950 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This short guide shows how you can pass through USB devices (such as a USB flash drive) to VirtualBox guests on an Ubuntu 8.10 VirtualBox 2 host. USB support is available only in the VirtualBox PUEL (closed-source) edition, not in the OSE edition, so make sure you have the PUEL edition installed.
Fedora Installing The Open Source Ticket Request System (OTRS) On Fedora 8
Post date: March 18, 2008, 05:03 Category: Installing Views: 1066 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up the Open Ticket Request System (OTRS) on Fedora 8. Taken from the OTRS page: "OTRS is an Open source Ticket Request System (also well known as trouble ticket system) with many features to manage customer telephone calls and e-mails. The system is built to allow your support, sales, pre-sales, billing, internal IT, helpdesk, etc. department to react quickly to inbound inquiries."
Unix+clones How to Set Up a Jabber Server
Post date: April 12, 2005, 11:04 Category: Software Views: 3038 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Unless you have been living under a rock for the past few years, you must have heard about instant messaging and how it has changed the world of communications over the Internet. According to http://www.webopedia.com, Instant Messaging (IM) is a service that alerts users when their friends or colleagues are on line and allows them to communicate in real time through private online chat areas. Two of the most popular IM services are AOL Instant Messenger (AIM) and MSN Messenger. Unfortunately, most of the publicly available servers use proprietary protocols that only allow you to communicate with users on the same system. These systems are not compatible with each other and can't be accessed from other clients.

Jabber is an open source implementation of the IM server that aims to change this. It uses streaming XML protocols that are free, open, and public. These protocols have been formalized by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) as the approved instant messaging and presence technology under the name of XMPP. The first Jabber technologies were developed in 1998 by Jeremie Miller and is now used on thousands of servers world-wide to enable millions of users to communicate with each other.

The biggest advantage of the Jabber server when compared with commercial IM servers is that, since it is open source, anyone can run a Jabber server and it can be restricted to a specific community like a company work force or a group of friends. In this article, I will document the steps I took to set up a Jabber server and how I managed to overcome the difficulties I faced. Hopefully this will make it easier for you to set up your own Jabber server.