Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for How To Search For Missing Packages With apt-file On Debian and Ubuntu

Debian How To Search For Missing Packages With apt-file On Debian and Ubuntu
Post date: February 21, 2007, 19:02 Category: System Views: 1259 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This short article describes how you can search for missing packages with apt-file on Debian and Ubuntu systems. apt-file allows you to search for a file name, and it gives back the name(s) of the package(s) containing that file so that you can install the appropriate package.
Ubuntu Apt-Cacher-NG - HTTP download proxy for software packages
Post date: February 24, 2009, 07:02 Category: System Views: 1424 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Apt-Cacher-ng is a software package that keeps a cache, on the disk, of Debian/Ubuntu Packages and Release files.When an apt-get like client issues a request for a file, Apt-Cacher intercepts it and if the file is already cached it serves it to the client immediately, otherwise it fetches the file from the Internet, saves it on the cache, and then serves it to the client. This means that several Debian machines can be upgraded but each package need to be downloaded only once.
Debian Installing Joomla 1.5.6 On A Lighttpd Web Server (Debian Etch)
Post date: September 16, 2008, 10:09 Category: Installing Views: 1531 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install Joomla 1.5.6 on a lighttpd web server on Debian Etch. Joomla comes with an .htaccess file with mod_rewrite rules (for Apache) (to enable search-engine friendly URLs) that do not work on lighttpd. Fortunately Joomla has a built-in method to make search-engine friendly URLs work on lighttpd as well.
Ubuntu Essential house keeping in Ubuntu
Post date: December 8, 2005, 11:12 Category: System Views: 1512 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: I started using Ubuntu Breezy ver 5.10 a month back on my machine. Prior to that I was exclusively into Fedora. What drew me to Ubuntu was the huge number of packages in its repositories including softwares which I find useful on a day-to-day basis like Tomboy which I had to compile from source in Fedora. But the Ubuntu CD comes with the base packages which support only open file formats. So if you want support for proprietary file formats like mp3 and quicktime support as well as install softwares not included on the CD, then you have to do some work.

I call it essential housekeeping because it is not exactly a problem, but only a matter of finding out how to get the necessary support. Here I share my experiences in putting the Ubuntu house in order on my machine.
Debian Howto Select Fastest Mirror in Debian
Post date: May 18, 2008, 11:05 Category: Network Views: 1294 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: If you want to select Fastest Mirror in Debian follow this tutorial and this is very helpful if you want to download and install your debian packages,Updates .netselect-apt automatically creates a sources.list file for using with apt for the specified distribution by downloading the list of Debian mirrors using wget and choosing the fastest servers (both US and non-US) using netselect. The output file is written to OUTFILE.
Debian Rolling your own Debian packages (part 1)
Post date: January 21, 2006, 06:01 Category: Software Views: 1050 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This two-part article explains how to make a Debian package of simple piece of software, presumably something you have written yourself. Although building a new package is more complex than rebuilding one or having one generated, the idea is that it is actually surprisingly simple to create basic Debian packages. In fact, if you can make software install into a temporary installation tree, you're already 90% done! This text provides a quick alternative to the more comprehensive Debian New Maintainers' Guide. Only knowledge of Makefiles and the basic Debian package tools is assumed.

The first part of this article will continue with some preliminary information about Debian packages. In the second part we walk through a concrete packaging example.
OpenSUSE GNOME Do - Launcher tool to search and launch applications files and more
Post date: October 21, 2008, 22:10 Category: Desktop Views: 1267 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: GNOME Do (Do) is an intelligent launcher tool that makes performing common tasks on your computer simple and efficient. “GNOME Do” not only allows you to search for items in your desktop environment (e.g. applications, contacts, bookmarks, files, music), it also allows you to specify actions to perform on search results (e.g. run, open, email, chat, play).
OpenSUSE Krusader - Advanced Twinpanel File Manager in openSUSE
Post date: October 10, 2008, 22:10 Category: Desktop Views: 1217 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Krusader is an advanced twin panel (commander style) file manager for KDE and other desktops in the *nix world, similar to Midnight or Total Commander. It provides all the file management features you could possibly want with features like extensive archive handling, mounted filesystem support, FTP, advanced search module, an internal viewer/editor, directory synchronisation, file content comparisons, powerful batch renaming and much much more
Debian How To Create A Local Debian/Ubuntu Mirror With apt-mirror
Post date: January 4, 2007, 20:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 1557 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to create a Debian/Ubuntu mirror for your local network with the tool apt-mirror. Having a local Debian/Ubuntu mirror is good if you have to install multiple systems in your local network because then all needed packages can be downloaded over the fast LAN connection, thus saving your internet bandwidth.
Debian Cleaning up a Debian GNU/Linux system
Post date: November 25, 2006, 08:11 Category: System Views: 1561 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: You arrive at a Debian GNU/Linux server which has some history of neglection. Let's suppose someone else neglected it but if your new-year resolution is to stop neglecting your beloved server, this applies as well.

One form of neglection is to install, install, install and never un-install any package. The common utility to perform installation and un-installation of packages is apt-get which adds to the problem because it doesn't have automatic removal of non-needed dependences.

That means that when phpMyAdmin was installed it also installed Apache, PHP and ton of other packages. phpMyAdmin was removed when it was no longer needed but Apache, PHP and the ton of packages remain there.

Aptitude to the rescue.
Website Python Coding Tutorial Solution For Every Bookie Gambling Player.