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Search results for How to Perform System Boot and Shutdown Procedures for Solaris 10

Linux Easy Linux Network Backup
Post date: April 12, 2005, 19:04 Category: Network Views: 42
Tutorial quote: If you use Linux, you already have access to extremely powerful tools for creating custom backup solutions. The solutions in this article can help you perform simple to more advanced and secure network backups using open source tools that are part of nearly every Linux distribution.
Unix+clones How to create OpenOffice.org macros and automation
Post date: April 12, 2005, 20:04 Category: Software Views: 31
Tutorial quote: There are times when you need to perform some task over and over, or when a task is complex enough that doing it manually makes it hard to get it right. OpenOffice.org macros allow you to save a sequence of operations with a single name so you can do the same thing repeatedly. Automation is a first cousin to macros. It lets another application control OOo and make things happen without user intervention.
OpenBSD Rebuilding the OpenBSD kernel
Post date: April 24, 2005, 16:04 Category: System Views: 93
Tutorial quote: Users who want their OpenBSD machine to perform specific functions or need additional device drivers might want to customize their kernel. In other OS's, like some types of Linux, it is very popular to rebuild the kernel because the default is so bloated. For most users, the default OpenBSD kernel is sufficient; however, you should still apply kernel patches, which will require rebuilding and installing a fresh kernel.
Linux Hardening Linux: a 10 step approach to a secure server
Post date: June 22, 2005, 06:06 Category: Security Views: 156
Tutorial quote: The Internet has become a far more dangerous place than it was 20 years ago. Nowadays, Operating System and application security is an integral part of a server configuration and, while firewalls are very important, they are not the panacea.

This list of steps is intended as a guideline with a practical approach. We’ll try to provide a complete picture without getting into unnecesary details. This list won’t replace a good book on secure systems administration, but it will be useful as a quick guide.

Before we get started it’s worth to mention that security is not a status: it’s just a process. The correct initial setup of the server only provides a good start and helps you get half the way through. But you actually need to walk the other half of the road, by providing proper security vigilance, monitoring and updating.
OSX VNC control of a Mac under OS X 10.4
Post date: December 10, 2005, 03:12 Category: Network Views: 60
Tutorial quote: VNC support is built right into Tiger. This means you can remote control you mac from an another mac a PC or even you Palm or Blackberry.

However the functionality is a bit hidden. Here are the simple steps to set it up. Remember this is TIGER not Panther.
Gentoo Fbsplash on gentoo
Post date: April 12, 2005, 01:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 177
Tutorial quote: Gensplash is a project started by Spock whose aim is to create a set of tools which could enrich the Gentoo boot process by displaying messages, animations, progress bars, etc. An explanation of the various things named *splash (bootsplash, gensplash, fbsplash, and splashutils) and how they relate to each other, can be found at Spock's Gensplash site.

Fbsplash is part of the gensplash project. According to fbsplash's documentation, "the framebuffer splash is a kernel feature that allows displaying a background picture on selected consoles and switching the first console to the so-called silent mode, while booting/rebooting/shutting down the system." The fbsplash device is accessed through the /dev/fbsplash device node. For fbsplash to work, a frame buffer device is required.
Unix+clones Using network transfer protocols
Post date: April 15, 2005, 14:04 Category: Network Views: 38
Tutorial quote: Let's face it, most of us are in a rut when it comes to moving our files around. We learned how to use a simple FTP client years ago, and maybe even updated to a GUI FTP client when we were feeling particularly adventurous. There are actually a wealth of tools available for transferring files, and some of them perform automation functions that can easily assist your business in building site mirrors, synchronizing directory contents, and more.

Keep in mind that for many of the tools covered here, there's only really room to skim through their features. Some, such as wget and rsync, are full of useful capabilities for those brave enough to read their man pages and experiment.
Linux Splash image in GRUB
Post date: April 24, 2005, 14:04 Category: Software Views: 49
Tutorial quote: The splash image is the image shown in the background when GRUB (the GRand Unified Bootloader) is displaying the list of operating systems you can boot. All you need to customize it is the GIMP and gzip.
SuSe How to set up smart package manager on SUSE LINUX 10.0
Post date: October 29, 2005, 20:10 Category: System Views: 142
Tutorial quote: Quote from the tutorial: The advantage of smartpm is, that, besides the ability to use mirrors it is able to use different repository structures. So I was able to use the apt-repository structure which provides more channels then the actual yum structure [...], and so I was able to build up a package management with update channels which is capable of using and choosing mirrors in a similar way as yum is.
RedHat Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4
Post date: July 18, 2005, 18:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 176
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.