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Search results for Howto install the base Linux system onto a USB thumbdrive with the root partition encrypted

Linux Howto install the base Linux system onto a USB thumbdrive with the root partition encrypted
Post date: April 20, 2006, 08:04 Category: System Views: 23
Tutorial quote: This howto will explain how to install a very basesystem onto a USB thumbdrive with the root partition encrypted. It includes support for cryptsetup-luks, and udev.
Gentoo Enterprise Volume Management System Mini How-To
Post date: April 13, 2005, 16:04 Category: System Views: 205
Tutorial quote: Here is a rough write-up on how I installed Gentoo 1.4_rc1 on EVMS, with the exception of the root partition. If you choose so, see the EVMS Howto for instructions on how to mount your root file system on an EVMS volume. I felt the hassle of dealing with a EVMS (or LVM, for that matter) root outweighs its advantages.

This is a very basic setup I used for my laptop. I only needed it so I don't have to worry about getting the partition sizes right from the beginning and to be able to adjust them with ease in the future. I've been using LVM with success but I couldn't find a way to resize the volume group itself. This, the fact that afaik there is no support for LVM in kernel 2.5.x and a new laptop needing a fresh installation made me try EVMS.
Debian Debian RAID 1/5 system installer
Post date: May 28, 2005, 18:05 Category: Installing Views: 193
Tutorial quote: Instructions for installing a very clean Debian GNU/Linux system that boots from RAID 1, and has RAID 1 or RAID 5 root and data filesystems.

The examples assume two identical harddrives, sda and sdb, on which after a small boot partition, 1 GB is used for swap, 25 GB is used for the root filesystem and everything else is for a big "data" partition that will hold non-system stuff.
Debian Installing Debian onto USB flash media with everything encrypted
Post date: September 28, 2005, 12:09 Category: Security Views: 228
Tutorial quote: This is a simple procedure for installing Debian GNU/Linux onto a USB key flash media. It includes several configuration changes but tries to stay as close to a default debian install as possible.

This is useful for administrators that need to carry sensitive information or people concerned about their privacy.
Linux USB Flash Memory HOWTO
Post date: April 15, 2005, 20:04 Category: Hardware Views: 91
Tutorial quote: The purpose of this document is to describe procedures for implementing USB flash memory devices (memory sticks) on Linux.
Debian Create an Encrypted Loopback Device
Post date: April 12, 2005, 14:04 Category: Security Views: 89
Tutorial quote: A loopback device is a very special device that allows you to mount a normal file as it was a physical device. loopbacks can be encrypted: this becomes very useful sometimes.

Consider, as na example, that you need to encrypt a few files, nothing big, let's say 100 MB or so. Encrypting an entire partition could be too much. Then a cryptoloop could be the right solution to your problem.
SuSe Correct Multimedia Support in SUSE Linux 9.2
Post date: April 12, 2005, 21:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 109
Tutorial quote: SUSE Linux is one of the better desktop Linux distributions on the market today, providing a functional and aesthetically pleasing environment for the new Linux user as well as seasoned veterans. On thing that puzzles many users is the lack of proper multimedia support in SUSE. The developers have basically crippled it from playing virtually all types of multimedia content that's common on the Internet today. This can be a frustrating dilema for new users, so I have written a short HOWTO to help you get everything in order on your new desktop.

It should be noted that you don't necessarily need to install apt to fix the multimedia problem on SUSE, but it's probably the most beneficial way to get it done. You can easily remove the offending packages and install new ones not provided by SUSE, but by using apt, you'll get the benefit of having a much larger package base available to you... something that SUSE has suffered from for a very long time. With or without apt, let's get things going with this HOWTO.
Debian Loop-AES
Post date: January 25, 2006, 18:01 Category: Security Views: 71
Tutorial quote: This is a step by step tutorial on creating an encrypted partition using Loop-AES (using AES-256). This tutorial is known to work under sarge.

Loop-AES is more secure than dm-crypt (and possibly faster), although it requires a custom kernel module and is more work to install than dm-crypt.
Gentoo Build your own Gentoo rescue LiveCD and USBStick
Post date: June 20, 2005, 00:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 153
Tutorial quote: I've written this how-to after trying to find a boot medium for my home gateway machine which could be used for system rescues and even installing Gentoo. Why not use the standard Gentoo Live CD you ask? Well my gateway machine is one of those small, silent and cool running mini-itx machines (http://www.mini-itx.com) and has no CDROM or floppy drive. I needed some way of getting Gentoo on there and some way of easily rescuing it when the need arises. The good news is that these VIA mini-tix machines are USB bootable and I much preferred the idea of having a little USB drive/stick that I could push into any USB bootable machine and boot into Linux rather than having to set up a PXE networked boot environment (which is also supported).
Linux The PartImage Handbook
Post date: May 21, 2005, 11:05 Category: Software Views: 43
Tutorial quote: - Partition Image is a Linux/UNIX partition imaging utility: it saves partitions formatted using the Ext2FS (the linux standard), ReiserFS (a new journaled and powerful file system), JFS IBM journaled file systems from AIX, NTFS (Windows NT File System), FAT16/32 (DOS & Windows file systems), or HPFS (OS/2 file system) file system formats to an image file. Only used blocks are copied. The image file can be compressed in the GZIP/BZIP2 formats to save disk space, and split into multiple files to be copied on removable media (ZIP for example), or burned on a CD-R ...

- This allows the user to save a full Linux/Windows system, with a single operation. When problems occur (viruses, crash, error, ...), you just have to restore, and after several minutes, all your system is restored (boot, files, ...), and fully working.

- This is very useful when installing the same software on many machines: just install one of them, create an image, and then restore the image on all other machines. After the first one, each subsequent installation can be made automaticaly, and only requires a few minutes.