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Unix+clones Running A MySQL-Based DNS Server: MyDNS
Post date: January 23, 2006, 10:01 Category: Network Views: 32
Tutorial quote: In this tutorial I will describe how to install and configure MyDNS, a DNS server that uses a MySQL database as backend instead of configuration files like, for example, Bind or djbdns. This has the advantage that you can easily use web-based frontends to administrate your DNS records. You could even write your own frontend, e.g. using PHP, to interact with the MyDNS database. MyDNS simply reads the records from the database, and it does not have to be restarted/reloaded when DNS records change or zones are created/edited/deleted! This is a major advantage.
Solaris Installing Solaris using JumpStart technology on an Intel laptop
Post date: April 13, 2005, 01:04 Category: Installing Views: 97
Tutorial quote: An interesting use of Solaris 8 on a PC laptop is for use with the JumpStart technology. It has never been so easy to install, re-install, or restore a server before.

As I am as a contractor, I am more on the road than in my own office, so I need a laptop, and preferably with Solaris installed, as I am focusing on Sun's products and applications.

Through the years, I have discovered that one of the most common scenarios is that a client needs a server installed, either because they just bought it, or need it re-installed, or recovered.

This article covers how to save time when installing servers, using the JumpStart technology on a laptop with Solaris for Intel.
Linux Building an LDAP Server on Linux, Part 2
Post date: April 15, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 51
Tutorial quote: Welcome back! In Part 1 we learned basic concepts of LDAP and the uses for an LDAP server. Today we'll install and configure an OpenLDAP directory.

A quick note before we get started: this is LDAP 101. We are not installing any kind of encryption or strong authentication; we'll get to that in part 3. In my experience, learning LDAP in small chunks works best. (Then again, perhaps I'm just a bit dim.) So sit back, strap in, and keep your fingers away from the training wheels.

"The wise sysadmin will consult the documentation for their distro; it's quite possible that OpenLDAP will be packaged and ready to go in a pleasing manner (or ready to go in an odd manner--you never know). I'm all for easy--if your particular distribution provides an easy way, use it. RPMs can also be obtained from rpmfind.net, which thoughtfully lists all the required additional packages.

"Debian of course goes its own merry way. apt-get does the job just fine; the tricky bit is finding out the package names. Debian users want ldap-utils; slapd, which is OpenLDAP; and libdb4.1, to get the Sleepycat DB. These three components are enough to get you up and running. apt-get will walk you through a minimal configuration and will automatically start up slapd, the LDAP server daemon.
Debian Building A Virtual Server (VPS) With Debian 3.1 (Sarge) And OpenVZ
Post date: March 20, 2006, 15:03 Category: System Views: 36
Tutorial quote: In this HowTo I will describe the steps to be taken to prepare a server for OpenVZ virtual machines on Debian 3.1 (Sarge) 32Bit Linux. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project. OpenVZ is the open-source branch of Virtuozzo, a commercial virtualization solution used by many providers that offer virtual servers. The OpenVZ kernal patch is licensed under the GPL license, and the user-level tools are under the QPL license.
Unix+clones Keeping Your Life in Subversion
Post date: October 2, 2005, 12:10 Category: Software Views: 119
Tutorial quote: I keep my life in a Subversion repository. For the past five years, I've checked every file I've created and worked on, every email I've sent or received, and every config file I've tweaked into revision control. Five years ago, when I started doing this using CVS, people thought I was nuts to use revision control in this way. Today it's still not a common practice, but thanks to my earlier article "CVS homedir" (Linux Journal, issue 101), I know I'm not alone. In this article I will describe how my new home directory setup is working now that I've switched from CVS to Subversion.

Subversion is a revision-control system. Like the earlier and much cruftier CVS, its purpose is to manage chunks of code, such as free software programs with multiple developers, or in-house software projects involving several employees. Unlike CVS, Subversion handles directories and file renaming reasonably, which is more than sufficient reason to switch to it if you're already using CVS. It also fixes most of CVS's other misfeatures. Subversion still has its warts, though, such as an inability to store symbolic links and some file permissions, and its need for twice as much disk space as you'd expect thanks to the copies of everything in those .svn directories. These problems can be quite annoying when you're keeping your whole home directory in svn. Why bother?
Unix+clones Remote backup using ssh, tar and cron
Post date: April 12, 2005, 21:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 51
Tutorial quote: Are you looking for a solution to backup your data to a remote location? While a solid backup solution such as Arkeia or TSM from IBM are nice from an enterprise point of view, simpler solutions are available from a home user's perspective. I will walk you through on you how you can backup your data to a remote server, using the default tools available on all linux systems. In a nutshell, we will use ssh capabilities to allow a cron job to transfer a tarball from you local machine to a remote machine.

For the purpose of this tutorial, the local machine will be called “localmachine” (running slackware) and the remote server will be called “remoteserver” (slackware as well). The user will be joe (me). You will have to substitute those 3 with your own machines names and user.
RedHat Tips & tricks: Performance tuning
Post date: November 25, 2005, 19:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 134
Tutorial quote: Advanced tips on optimizing your Red Hat server.
Debian Virtual Users And Domains With Postfix, Courier And MySQL (+ SMTP-AUTH, Quota, SpamAssassin, ClamAV)
Post date: October 9, 2005, 14:10 Category: Network Views: 213
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install a mail server based on Postfix that is based on virtual users and domains, i.e. users and domains that are in a MySQL database. I'll also demonstrate the installation and configuration of Courier (Courier-POP3, Courier-IMAP), so that Courier can authenticate against the same MySQL database Postfix uses.

The resulting Postfix server is capable of SMTP-AUTH and TLS and quota (quota is not built into Postfix by default, I'll show how to patch your Postfix appropriately). Passwords are stored in encrypted form in the database (most documents I found were dealing with plain text passwords which is a security risk). In addition to that, this tutorial covers the installation of Amavisd, SpamAssassin and ClamAV so that emails will be scanned for spam and viruses.
Debian Bind chroot howto
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Security Views: 55
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install the DNS server Bind on Debian so that it runs out of a chroot jail for security reasons.
Debian Setting up an SSL server with Apache2
Post date: February 12, 2006, 02:02 Category: Network Views: 54
Tutorial quote: With the introduction of the Apache2 packages in Debian it is much simpler to create and use a secure SSL protected webserver than in the old days with Apache 1.3, here we'll show how it is done.