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Unix+clones High Performance MySQL
Post date: November 30, 2006, 22:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 3108 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: The operating system your MySQL server runs on and the server's configuration can be just as important to your server's performance as the indexes, schema, or queries themselves. In this chapter, we will help you understand how to tune your server to improve performance, as opposed to tuning schema or queries. We'll be looking at changes to your hardware, operating system, and MySQL configuration to see what effects they have on overall performance.

We assume that you've already made efforts to boost the performance of your queries. If you haven't done that already, stop now and read Chapter 4 and Chapter 5 to get a handle on optimizing your queries and your application code. Only then should you worry about server settings. Hardware is often not the solution to MySQL performance problems. Poorly optimized queries can slow you down far more than not having the latest CPU or SCSI disk. To put this in perspective, one of the MySQL AB trainers even says that changing hardware might, in the best cases, give you a 10-fold performance increase. But tuning queries (and schemas) can often give you 1000-fold performance increase. Seriously.

Some topics covered in this chapter are platform-specific. The authors' knowledge of the various platforms on which MySQL runs is limited. In many cases, you'll need to consult your local documentation for various operating system tools and specifics.

We start with an overview of the factors that limit performance and then look more in depth at RAID, hardware, and operating system issues. The chapter finishes with a discussion of techniques you can use to locate, identify, and fix bottlenecks.
RedHat NIST Publically-Released Red Hat Enterprise Linux Benchmark
Post date: October 20, 2006, 23:10 Category: Benchmarks Views: 2147 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: The Benchmark is a compilation of security configuration actions and settings that "harden" Red Hat Linux operating systems. It is a CIS Level-I benchmark: the prudent level of minimum due care for operating system security. This benchmark was developed and tested on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) including RHEL 2.1, RHEL 3.0, and Fedora Core 1, 2, & 3. It is likely to work for other Linux distributions - especially Red Hat and Fedora derivatives - as well.
Fedora+Core How To Install VMware Server On A Fedora 7 Desktop
Post date: June 8, 2007, 18:06 Category: Installing Views: 2104 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install VMware Server on a Fedora 7 desktop. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems (virtual machines) such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system. This has the benefit that you can run multiple operating systems on the same hardware which saves a lot of money, and you can move virtual machines from one VMware Server to the next one (or to a system that has the VMware Player which is also free).
Fedora Using ATA Over Ethernet (AoE) On Fedora 10 (Initiator And Target)
Post date: June 2, 2009, 05:06 Category: Installing Views: 762 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up an AoE target and an AoE initiator (client), both running Fedora 10. AoE stands for "ATA over Ethernet" and is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows AoE initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) AoE target using normal ethernet cabling. "Remote" in this case means "inside the same LAN" because AoE is not routable outside a LAN (this is a major difference compared to iSCSI). To the AoE initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.
Linux Linux 2.6: Compiling and Installing
Post date: April 15, 2005, 17:04 Category: System Views: 912 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: We'll look at the process of compiling and installing a new kernel safely, without overwriting the existing kernel.

You can install as many kernels as you like on a Linux system, and select the one you want to run at boot time. This makes it easy to test different kernels, and different kernel configurations, with particular sets of hardware or applications. The wise network admin always tests new kernels before running them on production machines.
Solaris AMPS (Apache MySQL PHP SSL) for Solaris 10
Post date: January 26, 2007, 00:01 Category: Software Views: 3663 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: The strategy is to utilize as much of the Open Source and other free software bundled with Solaris 10 as possible and integrate Apache2, MySQL, PHP and SSL in a environment that can take full advantage of Solaris 10 zones, resource management and highly scaleable, secure System Administration.
Gentoo Apache with mpm-worker + PHP 5 + SSL + MySQL 4.1
Post date: June 5, 2005, 17:06 Category: Network Views: 1434 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: We can do Apache 2 with mpm-worker with PHP 5, along with SSL and MySQL 4.1. I tested my configuration with Apache 2.0.53, PHP 5.0.4, and MySQL 4.1.11.
Mandriva Virtual Users & Domains With Postfix, MySQL & SquirrelMail (Mandriva 2008.1)
Post date: April 15, 2008, 06:04 Category: Installing Views: 1110 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install a Postfix mail server that is based on virtual users and domains, i.e. users and domains that are in a MySQL database. I will also demonstrate the installation and configuration of Courier (Courier-POP3, Courier-IMAP), so that Courier can authenticate against the same MySQL database Postfix uses. In addition to that, this tutorial covers the installation of Amavisd, SpamAssassin and ClamAV so that emails will be scanned for spam and viruses. I will also show how to install SquirrelMail as a webmail interface so that users can read and send emails and change their passwords.
Unix+clones How To Set Up Database Replication In MySQL
Post date: December 14, 2005, 13:12 Category: Software Views: 1115 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial describes how to set up database replication in MySQL. MySQL replication allows you to have an exact copy of a database from a master server on another server (slave), and all updates to the database on the master server are immediately replicated to the database on the slave server so that both databases are in sync. This is not a backup policy because an accidentally issued DELETE command will also be carried out on the slave; but replication can help protect against hardware failures though.

In this tutorial I will show how to replicate the database exampledb from the master with the IP address 192.168.0.100 to a slave. Both systems (master and slave) are running Debian Sarge; however, the configuration should apply to almost all distributions with little or no modification.
Ubuntu Virtual Users/Domains With Postfix, Courier, MySQL, SquirrelMail (Ubuntu 9.04)
Post date: June 11, 2009, 07:06 Category: Installing Views: 266 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install a Postfix mail server that is based on virtual users and domains, i.e. users and domains that are in a MySQL database. I'll also demonstrate the installation and configuration of Courier (Courier-POP3, Courier-IMAP), so that Courier can authenticate against the same MySQL database Postfix uses. In addition to that, this tutorial covers the installation of Amavisd, SpamAssassin and ClamAV so that emails will be scanned for spam and viruses. I will also show how to install SquirrelMail as a webmail interface so that users can read and send emails and change their passwords.