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Search results for Installing Linux on the Mac mini

OpenBSD Using OpenBSD
Post date: April 26, 2006, 10:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 23
Tutorial quote: Many people responded to the call for OpenBSD and OpenSSH donations by purchasing an OpenBSD CD set. Those CDs are beginning to arrive in the mail, and when they do, how are you going to use them? If you're a software enthusiast who has never used OpenBSD before, you might enjoy installing it by yourself and figuring it out as you go. If, however, you're looking for a more practical approach to using OpenBSD as a desktop or server operating system, here's a guide to get you started.
Ubuntu Unofficial Ubuntu 5.04 Starter Guide
Post date: April 13, 2005, 18:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 547
Tutorial quote: This is probably the best guide for beginners with Ubuntu. It will help you setup Ubuntu in no time. Amongst other things it will walk you through installing BitTorrent client, edonkey client, email clients, browsers and a lot more. Definitely worth checking out.
Linux The PartImage Handbook
Post date: May 21, 2005, 11:05 Category: Software Views: 43
Tutorial quote: - Partition Image is a Linux/UNIX partition imaging utility: it saves partitions formatted using the Ext2FS (the linux standard), ReiserFS (a new journaled and powerful file system), JFS IBM journaled file systems from AIX, NTFS (Windows NT File System), FAT16/32 (DOS & Windows file systems), or HPFS (OS/2 file system) file system formats to an image file. Only used blocks are copied. The image file can be compressed in the GZIP/BZIP2 formats to save disk space, and split into multiple files to be copied on removable media (ZIP for example), or burned on a CD-R ...

- This allows the user to save a full Linux/Windows system, with a single operation. When problems occur (viruses, crash, error, ...), you just have to restore, and after several minutes, all your system is restored (boot, files, ...), and fully working.

- This is very useful when installing the same software on many machines: just install one of them, create an image, and then restore the image on all other machines. After the first one, each subsequent installation can be made automaticaly, and only requires a few minutes.
SuSe Installing FreeNX Server on SUSE 10
Post date: December 27, 2005, 10:12 Category: Network Views: 125
Tutorial quote: Not long ago, I reviewed SUSE Linux 10 and found that they had included the latest version of FreeNX (a free version of NoMachine's NX Server) on the installation media. I'd never really tried FreeNX at that point but had heard some good things about it, so I thought I'd give it a shot. Well, once it was installed and working I have to say I was immediately impressed by how simple it was to setup and how well (read: fast) it performed over a WAN connection. I was literally able to get my desktop at home from anywhere else in the world and get near-local speed. Normally, working on a remote system is alright until you need to type in any shape or form. There was almost no delay from the time I'd press a key to the time it would show up on the screen. This is what sold me on FreeNX and prompted me to offer to write a HOWTO on the topic. I was overwhelmed with email from our readers asking that I write it... so here we are!
Debian Installing SVN with apache on debian
Post date: March 20, 2006, 15:03 Category: Software Views: 36
Tutorial quote: Today I started to set up a SVN repository for our final year project. I tried to setup a SVN server using Apache2 so that the SVN repository is available to the client through the WebDAV/DeltaV protocol. Read on for a trial-and-error introduction.

The Version Control with Subversion book (by Ben Collins-Sussman, Brian W. Fitzpatrick & C. Michael Pilato) was very useful to me when I struggled with SVN. The e-version of the book also available for free.
Debian An apt-get primer
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: System Views: 90
Tutorial quote: If any single program defines the Debian Linux project, that program is apt-get. apt-get is Debian's main tool for installing and removing software. Working with the .deb package format, apt-get offers sophisticated package management that few Red Hat Package Manager RPM-based distributions can match.

Besides the convenience, an advantage of apt-get is that it reduces the chances of falling into dependency hell, that limbo where software installation fails for lack of another piece of software, whose installation fails for lack of another piece of software, and so on. If you know how Debian's archive system works, and how to choose the sources that apt-get uses, and use a few precautions in your upgrades, then the chances are that dependency problems will never bedevil you. Should you descend into dependency hell anyway, apt-get offers useful tools for climbing out of it.
Ubuntu Installing Windows XP/2000 in Free VMWare Player
Post date: November 27, 2005, 12:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 216
Tutorial quote: This guide will allow you to install Windows XP or 2000 solely with the VMWare Player. For the uninitiated, VMWare released a free application that allows users to run, but not create virtual machines. Using QEMU, we will create an environment suitable for use with the player.

As a side-note, I'd like to point out that VMWare makes quality software. If you require additional functionality, consider upgrading to Workstation.
OpenBSD Failover Firewalls with OpenBSD and CARP
Post date: April 27, 2005, 22:04 Category: Network Views: 231
Tutorial quote: Firewalls are a required component in commercial and residential computer networks. For many installations, the firewall is a single point of failure between client systems and external resources. It can also become a liability when hardware or applications fail, leaving potential customers unable to reach your servers. A properly designed and executed failover configuration for your primary firewall will address many of these concerns. This article introduces a proven method for installing redundant stateful firewalls using native OpenBSD features.
Unix+clones A web server in a shell script
Post date: March 14, 2006, 03:03 Category: Programming Views: 30
Tutorial quote: Suppose you want to experiment a little with web pages and CGI's, but you don't want the hassle of installing the full Apache package. This quick and dirty shell script could just be what you need.

Put simply, a web server is an application that sends local text files over the network to the clients that request them. If you let another program (for example inetd) deal with the network part, the web server could be reduced to a mere cat "$filename" to stdout. Of course, the difficult part would be to extract that filename out of the HTTP request string: nothing that a Bash script cannot easily do!
Debian Creating .deb-Packages With Checkinstall
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 48
Tutorial quote: Checkinstall is a nice tool to create simple .deb-packages that you can use in your local network (e.g. if you have to install the same piece of software on multiple computers running Debian). It lets you compile and install software from the sources like before, but with the difference that you end up with a simple Debian package which also means that you can easily uninstall the software you just compiled by running dpkg -r!

I will demonstrate the use of checkinstall by compiling and installing the anti-virus software ClamAV on a Debian system.

This howto is meant as a practical guide; it does not cover the theoretical backgrounds. They are treated in a lot of other documents in the web.