Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for Installing ProFTPD

Ubuntu Installing Windows XP/2000 in Free VMWare Player
Post date: November 27, 2005, 12:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 216
Tutorial quote: This guide will allow you to install Windows XP or 2000 solely with the VMWare Player. For the uninitiated, VMWare released a free application that allows users to run, but not create virtual machines. Using QEMU, we will create an environment suitable for use with the player.

As a side-note, I'd like to point out that VMWare makes quality software. If you require additional functionality, consider upgrading to Workstation.
OpenBSD Failover Firewalls with OpenBSD and CARP
Post date: April 27, 2005, 22:04 Category: Network Views: 231
Tutorial quote: Firewalls are a required component in commercial and residential computer networks. For many installations, the firewall is a single point of failure between client systems and external resources. It can also become a liability when hardware or applications fail, leaving potential customers unable to reach your servers. A properly designed and executed failover configuration for your primary firewall will address many of these concerns. This article introduces a proven method for installing redundant stateful firewalls using native OpenBSD features.
Debian Installing and Configuring Exim4
Post date: February 25, 2006, 07:02 Category: Network Views: 88
Tutorial quote: Installion of Exim4 from the latest Debian GNU/Linux packages is easy. The installation is now based around debconf. If you are upgrading from a simple Exim3 configuration, you can use exim_convert4r4 to convert your configuration file to the new format. If you used the previous version of this guide, which covered Exim3, the conversion should succeed without incident. I intend to discuss configuration via debconf, including setting up local delivery to Maildir format, handling local domain email, and configuring smarthosting for outbound email.
Unix+clones A web server in a shell script
Post date: March 14, 2006, 03:03 Category: Programming Views: 30
Tutorial quote: Suppose you want to experiment a little with web pages and CGI's, but you don't want the hassle of installing the full Apache package. This quick and dirty shell script could just be what you need.

Put simply, a web server is an application that sends local text files over the network to the clients that request them. If you let another program (for example inetd) deal with the network part, the web server could be reduced to a mere cat "$filename" to stdout. Of course, the difficult part would be to extract that filename out of the HTTP request string: nothing that a Bash script cannot easily do!
Debian Creating .deb-Packages With Checkinstall
Post date: April 12, 2005, 13:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 48
Tutorial quote: Checkinstall is a nice tool to create simple .deb-packages that you can use in your local network (e.g. if you have to install the same piece of software on multiple computers running Debian). It lets you compile and install software from the sources like before, but with the difference that you end up with a simple Debian package which also means that you can easily uninstall the software you just compiled by running dpkg -r!

I will demonstrate the use of checkinstall by compiling and installing the anti-virus software ClamAV on a Debian system.

This howto is meant as a practical guide; it does not cover the theoretical backgrounds. They are treated in a lot of other documents in the web.
Gentoo Build your own Gentoo rescue LiveCD and USBStick
Post date: June 20, 2005, 00:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 153
Tutorial quote: I've written this how-to after trying to find a boot medium for my home gateway machine which could be used for system rescues and even installing Gentoo. Why not use the standard Gentoo Live CD you ask? Well my gateway machine is one of those small, silent and cool running mini-itx machines (http://www.mini-itx.com) and has no CDROM or floppy drive. I needed some way of getting Gentoo on there and some way of easily rescuing it when the need arises. The good news is that these VIA mini-tix machines are USB bootable and I much preferred the idea of having a little USB drive/stick that I could push into any USB bootable machine and boot into Linux rather than having to set up a PXE networked boot environment (which is also supported).
Debian Setting up a local web server in Debian Linux
Post date: January 21, 2006, 01:01 Category: Network Views: 41
Tutorial quote: Any web developer, designer, or webmaster can benefit from having a local web server. Even if that developer has no interest in securing and maintaining the server his or her websites live on, a local server can act as a convenient mirror for testing updates, trying new designs, and other general sand-boxing activities.

Web developers whose hosts utilize the popular LAMP platform (Linux + Apache + MySQL + PHP) are frequently hit with a dilemma. Since understanding Linux is not a prerequisite for website administrators, many of them lack the knowledge necessary for setting up a LAMP server from scratch (or at least they may think so). But thanks to the improved package management on Linux distributions like Debian, installing a functional web server is not nearly the chore it was just a couple years ago.
SuSe Installing FreeNX Server on SUSE 10
Post date: December 27, 2005, 10:12 Category: Network Views: 125
Tutorial quote: Not long ago, I reviewed SUSE Linux 10 and found that they had included the latest version of FreeNX (a free version of NoMachine's NX Server) on the installation media. I'd never really tried FreeNX at that point but had heard some good things about it, so I thought I'd give it a shot. Well, once it was installed and working I have to say I was immediately impressed by how simple it was to setup and how well (read: fast) it performed over a WAN connection. I was literally able to get my desktop at home from anywhere else in the world and get near-local speed. Normally, working on a remote system is alright until you need to type in any shape or form. There was almost no delay from the time I'd press a key to the time it would show up on the screen. This is what sold me on FreeNX and prompted me to offer to write a HOWTO on the topic. I was overwhelmed with email from our readers asking that I write it... so here we are!
Solaris Installing Solaris 8 x86
Post date: April 12, 2005, 23:04 Category: Installing Views: 78
Tutorial quote: Solaris x86 can picky when it comes to hardware. It may not work on hardware that's not listed in the HCL (Hardware Compatibility List). My older Pentium system's motherboard was OK, and it found the hard-drive I had connected to the primary IDE channel (on the motherboard) but it wouldn't recognize the CD-ROM drive even though it was connected to the secondary IDE channel on the motherboard. (I had better luck on a system where the CD-ROM drive was connected as the slave on the primary IDE channel. I prefer to keep the CD-ROM drive off the hard-drive channel but if all else fails you can try this to see if it works. :)
Debian Boot Debian from an external firewire drive on PowerPc Mac
Post date: December 14, 2005, 14:12 Category: Installing Views: 83
Tutorial quote: Messing with a boot process is a delicate matter even on a Mac. Note that the Debian installer will fail at some point during the procedure.
I offer no warranty and assume no responsibility for whatever loss or damage might be caused to your hardware, software or data.
There are other ways to boot Linux from an external firewire drive documented elsewhere on the net. See the Resources section.

Adding or removing peripherals like usb keys, digital cameras, other external HDs, cdroms etc, or installing/removing devfs, udev, and similar stuff might alter the way Linux sees the firewire drive, i suggest becoming familiar with supplying boot options to yaboot during the boot process. See Man pages of yaboot and yaboot.conf.